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New 2011 MacBook Pro Heating Issue?

555051 Views 849 Replies Latest reply: Jan 19, 2014 10:16 PM by unDesign RSS Branched to a new discussion.
  • decisivemoment Level 1 Level 1 (115 points)
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    Apr 13, 2011 8:18 AM (in response to stare bare)
    I've had around 30 on the base with 75 on the CPU and in the 50s on the CPU heatsink. This, of course, was Flash-related. The computer really does not use the case at all as a heatsink, so the big temperature difference between CPU and enclosure base is not surprising to me. The big picture is that the way it performs on heat is overall a bit better than my 2008 laptop and far better than the 2006 lemon I had.

    I noticed in the store that the 2010 models ran very cool even with lots of demos; perhaps people are comparing the new models to those. I had a chance to compare a 2010 to a 2011 side-by-side and the 2010 did seem to run cooler, but there's no doubt the 2011 beats the older models I've owned.
    PowerMac G4 DA, MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.4)
  • stare bare Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Apr 13, 2011 5:37 PM (in response to decisivemoment)
    I wouldnt put to much hope of the thermal paste helping, Ive tried it on my current machine (even greased the fans) and it didnt change its heat or noise output.
    2.4ghz core 2 (santarosa), Mac OS X (10.5.2)
  • bushwakko Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 3:08 AM (in response to decisivemoment)
    decisivemoment wrote:
    Second, it still busts a gut running flash movies. 75C on the CPU, 55C on the CPU heatsink, something like that. (It would be interesting to see if having the integrated graphics on the processor is a factor here.) Third, it does very well on Quicktime; a big 1080 preview and the CPU barely touches 40C. Fourth, 40C is a common temperature in browsing use when plugged into mains electricity, as opposed to the upper 40s to around 50 on my 2008.


    So are you saying that istat menus gives you 40-50 when just browsing? I'm lucky to get below 60 when just letting it idle. Keep in mind I got Apple Service technicians to change the thermal paste to arctic silver as well. I have the 2.2ghz.
    MBP Early 2011 2.2ghz, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • stare bare Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 8:23 AM (in response to bushwakko)
    there are a few reviews about sandybridge for pc's that conclude that the integrated gpu heat added to the cpu is surprisingly minimal.

    My tests with quicktime vs VLC show 20% cpu use compared to %40 with VLC with the same movie.

    which backs up my own subjective opinion that its not a hardware issue as much as it is a resource handling problem with the OS which is good because its easier to fix.

    now I just have to wait for it to be fixed.......................
    2.4ghz core 2 (santarosa), Mac OS X (10.5.2)
  • wogi Calculating status...
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    Apr 14, 2011 8:43 AM (in response to stare bare)
    wow stop saying its a software issue. This problem is on Mac OS X, on Windows. Not matter what application stresses the cpu. It gets super hot even on average load.
    MC723D, Mac OS X (10.6.7), Macbook Pro 15"
  • Sandylp Level 3 Level 3 (665 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 10:03 AM (in response to dkaechler)
    I have a 2011 15" 2.3ghz and it doesn't seem to have the heating issue you describe. I've noticed that it is at its hottest when watching Netflix, however. The CPU temps are around 78 degrees C and both fans are around 2400rpm. While browsing the internet or using Mail, the temps go back to 35 or 40C and the fans are below 2000rpm.
    2011 15" MacBook Pro, 27" Monitor, Mac OS X (10.6.6), 120GB iPod, iPhone4
  • decisivemoment Level 1 Level 1 (115 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 12:10 PM (in response to bushwakko)
    That's pretty much what I'm saying. I also suggest you compare between on mains and off; I am usually on battery when surfing, and I know from past experience that can make a major difference. But in general I'm seeing 35 to 40C browsing. With flash cordoned off, of course. I was getting about 50 at one point yesterday when browsing while charging.

    You might want to check if something bad came across if you set the computer up with Migration Assistant. I have not used that so far, preferring to install new applications on the new machine, while steadily cleaning up the hard drive on the old one. I'll use Migration Assistant to migrate email and a handful of registered applications once all the old PowerPC/Rosetta kruft is cone.
    PowerMac G4 DA, MacBook Pro Early 2011, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • decisivemoment Level 1 Level 1 (115 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 12:13 PM (in response to Sandylp)
    That's fairly representative of my experience with the 2.2GHz, with the caveat that you'll see 10-15C higher while the battery is charging at full power off mains from zero to 80 percent charged.
    PowerMac G4 DA, MacBook Pro Early 2011, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • decisivemoment Level 1 Level 1 (115 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 12:21 PM (in response to wogi)
    That's simply not what I'm seeing on mine. It's clearly cooler running than the 2008 Penryn I have, although I don't think it's as cool-running as last year's i5/i7 Arrandale MBPs. I have not seen anything to suggest that the 15 I have is seriously out of line with Anandtech's findings on heat and noise.

    I am concerned that they didn't enlarge the heatsink, because the peak power of this processor is high, so if you're taxing all cores, then yes, it's going to get excessively hot. Maybe you're doing things that routinely put, say, a 30 to 40 percent load on all cores? That will heat it up real fast. But simply doing something like demanding browsing running Flash? That doesn't go on all cores, but rather, two. What I saw yesterday while comparing the new and old computers running President Obama's budget speech using the live White House feed was roughly 47 to 48 percent on each of two processes in the old machine, 80C and about 4300rpm on the fans . . . . and about 25 to 26 percent on each of two processes on the new machine, about 78-80C and 2200rpm on the fans. This for running in full-screen mode. Simply running in the window resulted in a drop of about 1000rpm on the old machine, while the new machine dropped to about 75C and the default 2000rpm.

    Hope these data help.
    PowerMac G4 DA, MacBook Pro Early 2011, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • decisivemoment Level 1 Level 1 (115 points)
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    Apr 14, 2011 12:23 PM (in response to stare bare)
    Quicktime doesn't even begin to tax this machine. 1080p preview in Quicktime gets me quickly to about 38-40C within seconds (using the battery or on mains at 100 percent charge; that number would be quite a bit higher if done while charging) but then it stays there. That's it. Absolutely remarkable.
    PowerMac G4 DA, MacBook Pro Early 2011, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • Sandylp Level 3 Level 3 (665 points)
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    Apr 15, 2011 5:04 PM (in response to decisivemoment)
    As a follow-up to my earlier post, I noticed that the cpu temperature gets hotter while watching a Netflix streaming video, but it doesn't get nearly as high if I watch a movie downloaded from iTunes.
    2011 15" MacBook Pro, 27" Monitor, Mac OS X (10.6.6), 120GB iPod, iPhone4
  • FLASHFLOOD Calculating status...
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    Apr 15, 2011 5:23 PM (in response to killthelights)
    Hi All,

    I have a 13" i5 2011 that I bought yesterday. It was so hot after browsing with one tab in Safari that I was unable to touch the bottom. With Photoshop running the fan was loud and running hard for hours without stopping.

    I disabled Time Machine Local Snap shots and set my display to about 60% brightness and it instantly cooled off.

    Now, the system is running warm, but not hot and the fan comes on intermittently and then shuts down. Keep in mind that my drive is still getting indexed by spotlight and I expect that it will cool down even more once the indexing is done.

    This machine is well worth waiting for the indexing to finish before I cast my final judgment regarding how hot it runs.

    I hope this helps!

    - flood
    - http://www.flashfloodphotography.com
    Macbook Pro 13 i5 - 2011, Hybrid 500 GB 7200k
  • bombforest Calculating status...
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    Apr 17, 2011 4:37 AM (in response to killthelights)

    WOW,the temp issue is really concerns.

  • Cow007 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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    Apr 19, 2011 9:40 AM (in response to Herb Schaltegger)

    I have a 2011 13" with the i5 dual @ 2.3 GHZ. I did tests with cpu and gpu running at full tilt and no overheating. Ran folding@home all night and temp stanble around 196. Question: does intel graphics 3000 support CPL?

  • Drtmpkns Calculating status...
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    Apr 20, 2011 2:00 PM (in response to killthelights)

    Hello All,

     

    Just my observations from yesterday:

     

    I have my 2010 13" 2.66Ghz and 2011 13" 2.7GHz i7 side by side with the factory installed OS X on each and iStat installed to measure temp and fan speed. I installed a free game called Lunar Rover (simple 3D graphics, driving around on the moon) from the Apple site and ran the game on both. At idle, both machines are around 40 degrees celsius. Once I run the game, just launching it, not actually driving the lunar rover around, the 2010 model bumps up to around 40% CPU utilization and 48 degrees celsius and the fan stays constant at 1996RPM which I don't really hear. On the 2011 however, the CPU is around 8% utilization but in less than sixty seconds the CPU heat rises to 82 degrees celsius and the fan ramps up quickly to around 5500RPM. If I start driving the lunar lander around, the 2010 model bumps up to 45% CPU utilization and 52 degrees celsius and the fan remains in the 1995-2200RPM range. Again still quite quiet. On the 2011, as I start driving the lunar lander, the temp kicks up to 92 degrees celsius and the fan exceeds 6200RPM which sounds like a hair dryer. Interestingly, despite the i7 CPU utilization around 8-10% which is much lower utilization than the 2010's CPU utilization, the 2011 machine still gets hot very rapidly. Similar results when playing Full Deck Solitaire (free off the App Store).

     

    I expected more fan noise given the huge step up in performance. And I don't consider 90-92 degrees celsius "overheating" and the i7 never exceeded 92 degrees celsius. In fact, when the fan kicks up to 6200RPM, it does a pretty good job of cooling the i7 back down to the 76-82 degree celsius range. I think it's just surprising to many folks, myself included, how loud the fan gets doing nominal work and how soon the fans spin up, and how the same workload on the 2010 13" 2.66GHz doesn't exhibit the same fan ramp - it takes a lot of gaming to get my 2010 fan to kick in over 2000RPM and watching movies never caused the fan to spin up on the 2010. Even doing work in Excel (just 150 or so rows and 6 columns) had the 2011 fans bumping up to 3000-4000RPM within a few minutes. And I have both machines on a flat table surface, not on my lap or on a blanket. :-)

     

    I don't completely blame Apple, and not really even Intel, given the performance and power characteristics Intel was shooting for. Although I think for small and light notebooks like the 13" MBP which have limited space and small heatsinks, maybe having the CPU+GPU on single chip is a bad idea from a quiet cooling/usability standpoint. Honestly, I think even Steve Jobs would be annoyed at the fan noise. I know Apple needs to be competitive and have the latest and greatest like the rest of the PC world at times, but in terms of enjoyability of use, and a pleasant computing experience not interrupted all the time by full speed fans, perhaps Apple/Intel missed the mark a bit for the 13" MBP. For those who absolutely need the power in this form factor, they'll likely live with the noise. Most folks however were probably not expecting it.

     

    The 2011 is super fast (compression and encryption tasks are about twice as fast as my 2010), but for my needs, I'm sticking with my 2010 model for now. As an aside, I went through two 2011 13" 2.7GHz models, one from Apple, and one from J&R in NYC. Both had identical fan noise and they also had dimmer/duller screen backlighting and color. This being the topic of other threads, I know, but perhaps both the screen and heat issues are tied to the Intel HD 3000 video. In each instance, the 2011's and my 2010 all had the LG 9CC5 screen, yet the 2010 had superior/true white and black with crisp colors, while the 2011's by comparison, looked closer to what I had on my Lenovo ThinkPad T410s (horrible displays).

     

    Anyhow, still an Apple fan. Keeping my 2010 13" MBP for now, hoping perhaps Apple goes back to a discrete/separate graphics chip for the 13" form factor as well as introduce higher resolutions in future models. :-)

     

    Cheers,

    Daniel

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