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  • Philly_Phan Level 6 Level 6 (12,370 points)

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    Anchann wrote:

     

    The assisted gps in the iOS devices, by the way, are what make them so much better than the competition too. Always able to pinpoint my location due to it.

    You don't know the competition's capability. Every 3G/4G GPS capable device I know of uses AGPS.

    As do the standalone nav systems.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,730 points)

    alanfromwickford wrote:

     

    Chris,

    And?

    i fail to see why that matters?

    Because you asked.

  • Anchann Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Philly_Phan wrote:

     

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    Anchann wrote:

     

    The assisted gps in the iOS devices, by the way, are what make them so much better than the competition too. Always able to pinpoint my location due to it.

    You don't know the competition's capability. Every 3G/4G GPS capable device I know of uses AGPS.

    As do the standalone nav systems.

    I wasn't aware standalone nav systems used 3G. And I was referring to Android phones, more specifically the one I had. I assumed it didn't use assisted GPS because it couldn't pinpoint my location at all.

  • alanfromwickford Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    and i ask again,

    you seem to have a problem with my post made in old threads - and you STILL havent exsplained why you feel you needed to highlight it is an old thread as though it was some sort of forum crime.

     

    so i think i prooved by tour avoidance to answer properly - you simply have had no valid reason!

  • alanfromwickford Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    "find my phone" can be useful but has limitations, I think it wise to consider the capabilities, and your actions before the event, should you ever loose your Apple device.

     

    'find my phone' while it can give you a location, it can't give you what floor. so if your handset or ipad is in a block of flats or offices your still fairly stuffed, but it did locate mine on my drive :).

     

    you can send a remote wipe command, but you need to do that before you report it as lost, or the data wipe won't work. it also can't work if the phone us in airplane mode, so now how will you know it was wiped? and i'm not sure if the server resends or how long it tries for.

     

    if you don't use password, whoever finds/steals it, could be making international calls at your cost and also reading your data, so i feel it wise at least to set the auto wipe up in settings, to delete data after 10 wrong codevattempts.

     

    at this point the phone becomes as though it has just come out of the box, that also means 'find my phone' is not now set up for tracing.

  • Philly_Phan Level 6 Level 6 (12,370 points)

    Anchann wrote:

     

    Philly_Phan wrote:

     

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    Anchann wrote:

     

    The assisted gps in the iOS devices, by the way, are what make them so much better than the competition too. Always able to pinpoint my location due to it.

    You don't know the competition's capability. Every 3G/4G GPS capable device I know of uses AGPS.

    As do the standalone nav systems.

    I wasn't aware standalone nav systems used 3G. And I was referring to Android phones, more specifically the one I had. I assumed it didn't use assisted GPS because it couldn't pinpoint my location at all.

    No, standalone nav systems do NOT use 3G.  They use AGPS.

     

    GPS signals are separate from and completely unrelated to both the Internet and the cellular telephone network.  GPS signals come directly from the GPS satellites.  They provide latitude and longitude information to GPS receivers.  Navigation software then takes that latitude/longitude info and converts it to land mass, roads, bridges, highways, buildings, etc.

     

    AGPS signals are the same as GPS signals except that they come from ground stations.  The sum total of the satellite signals and the ground station signals provide greater accuracy than that from the satellite alone.  Satellite signals are available everywhere on earth whereas ground station signals are typically in in metropolitan areas.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,730 points)

    A-GPS is broadcast over cellular network/frequencies (GSM, CDAM, LTE, etc.) from cell towers.

    The data for A-GPS is received from GPS satellites by the cell towers, data is converted and it is broadcast to cell phones and devices capable of receiving cell data.

  • BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (11,080 points)

    Anchann wrote:

     

    Philly_Phan wrote:

     

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    Anchann wrote:

     

    The assisted gps in the iOS devices, by the way, are what make them so much better than the competition too. Always able to pinpoint my location due to it.

    You don't know the competition's capability. Every 3G/4G GPS capable device I know of uses AGPS.

    As do the standalone nav systems.

    I wasn't aware standalone nav systems used 3G. And I was referring to Android phones, more specifically the one I had. I assumed it didn't use assisted GPS because it couldn't pinpoint my location at all.

    My Android phone uses AGPS. AGPS does not "pinpoint" your location, it makes your position available faster initially. Say you power up your GPS device. It has to initially locate the satelites before your position can be determined. AGPS makes this initial position determination so that your device does not have to search all the visible sky to find satelites. Once the AGPS makes the position determination your GPS device only has to find the satelites visible to that location.

  • Philly_Phan Level 6 Level 6 (12,370 points)

    Chris CA wrote:

     

    A-GPS is broadcast over cellular network/frequencies (GSM, CDAM, LTE, etc.) from cell towers.

    I did not know that.  However, it does not conflict with my poorly worded point.  Even though the frequencies are the same, the AGPS signals are unrelated to phone calls and non-phone devices can use AGPS.

     

     

    Chris CA wrote:

     

    The data for A-GPS is received from GPS satellites by the cell towers, data is converted and it is broadcast to cell phones and devices capable of receiving cell data.

    Something else that I didn't know.

  • Philly_Phan Level 6 Level 6 (12,370 points)

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    Anchann wrote:

     

    Philly_Phan wrote:

     

    BobTheFisherman wrote:

     

    Anchann wrote:

     

    The assisted gps in the iOS devices, by the way, are what make them so much better than the competition too. Always able to pinpoint my location due to it.

    You don't know the competition's capability. Every 3G/4G GPS capable device I know of uses AGPS.

    As do the standalone nav systems.

    I wasn't aware standalone nav systems used 3G. And I was referring to Android phones, more specifically the one I had. I assumed it didn't use assisted GPS because it couldn't pinpoint my location at all.

    My Android phone uses AGPS. AGPS does not "pinpoint" your location, it makes your position available faster initially. Say you power up your GPS device. It has to initially locate the satelites before your position can be determined. AGPS makes this initial position determination so that your device does not have to search all the visible sky to find satelites. Once the AGPS makes the position determination your GPS device only has to find the satelites visible to that location.

    Clearly my previous comment about "greater accuracy" is incorrect.

  • rockmyplimsoul Level 5 Level 5 (6,230 points)

    Philly_Phan wrote:

     

    GPS signals come directly from the GPS satellites.  They provide latitude and longitude information to GPS receivers.

    Looks like you've taken a beating already, so one more minor correction ... satellites do not actually transmit lattitude and longitude information to a GPS receiver.  Your lattitude and longitued are calculated by your receiver based on the triangulation of the satellite signals it is receiving.  In basic terms, the satellites chirp their data stream (including their unique ID) all at the same time, but the signals arrive at your receiver at different times due to the different lengths the signals travel.  Your GPS receiver compares the timing difference from each satellite ID to determine, via triangulation, where in the world you are.  As noted above, this takes some time initially, so A-GPS speeds things up by narrowing your position down via cell towers.

  • Philly_Phan Level 6 Level 6 (12,370 points)

    rockmyplimsoul wrote:

     

    Philly_Phan wrote:

     

    GPS signals come directly from the GPS satellites.  They provide latitude and longitude information to GPS receivers.

    Looks like you've taken a beating already, so one more minor correction ... satellites do not actually transmit lattitude and longitude information to a GPS receiver.  Your lattitude and longitued are calculated by your receiver based on the triangulation of the satellite signals it is receiving.  In basic terms, the satellites chirp their data stream (including their unique ID) all at the same time, but the signals arrive at your receiver at different times due to the different lengths the signals travel.  Your GPS receiver compares the timing difference from each satellite ID to determine, via triangulation, where in the world you are.  As noted above, this takes some time initially, so A-GPS speeds things up by narrowing your position down via cell towers.

    No argument there.  I took some latitude (pun intended) in my effort to reduce your explanation to one sentence.

  • stevejobsfan0123 Level 8 Level 8 (38,215 points)

    rockmyplimsoul wrote:

     

    so one more minor correction ... satellites do not actually transmit lattitude and longitude information to a GPS receiver.

    One minor correction: Latitude. Two L's.

  • rockmyplimsoul Level 5 Level 5 (6,230 points)

    stevejobsfan0123 wrote:

     

    rockmyplimsoul wrote:

     

    so one more minor correction ... satellites do not actually transmit lattitude and longitude information to a GPS receiver.

    One minor correction: Latitude. Two L's.

    And one more ... it was actually two T's

  • Dah•veed Level 7 Level 7 (32,355 points)

    Erm... how about two Ts.

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