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mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
I would like to know if the use of this command before an OSX update would affect the operation of my computer after the 10.6.7 update. I had to use this command (suggested by vea1083) to fix a directory ownership disassociation following the iTunes 10.2.1 Update which slowed my MacBook Pro boot up speed by twice of the time. The following command was used to fix the issue and it worked successfully:

*sudo chown root:admin /*

Thank you for any assistance in this matter.

MacBook Pro i5 2.53 GHz, Mac OS X (10.6.6), 4GB of Ram
  • mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Any ideas?
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (164,415 points)
    I don't have any idea how that action could have the effects you describe. Contrary to popular belief in these forums, incorrect permissions don't slow things down. They either have no effect at all, or they stop things from working at all.

    In any case, the owneship of the root directory should already be root:admin. If it isn't, don't improvise a fix yourself; run "Repair Permissions" in Disk Utility.
  • Nils C. Anderson Level 4 Level 4 (3,495 points)
    I agree with Linc. Also if the ownership and/or permissions of the root directory '/' are
    different from what that should be. There is no telling what other files/directories have
    the wrong ownership/permissions set on them. As Linc wrote, "run "Repair Permissions" in Disk Utility."
  • mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Thank You for your responses, besides noticing that my thread has been moved to another forum let me give you a little insight on my decision to call in this command in the terminal window.

    It all started 1 month ago, I performed an iTunes update and to my surprise, my boot time went up from 22 seconds to almost 50 seconds. I cleared my log in items and repaired my permissions, with no success, so I had to take the sledgehammer approach and reinstall OSX and get the combo update to bring back my computer to OSX 10.6.6, after performing the reinstallation, my boot time went back to normal (22 seconds). Thinking that this was only a one time issue, when iTunes 10.2.0 came out I performed the iTunes update and again I was presented with the slow boot up issue after updating iTunes, angered by the fact that the same issue resurfaced, again I performed another permissions repair and reboot, and using my Mac in Safeboot mode failed, I had to again reinstall OSX again. Now hopeless, when the iTunes update 10.2.1 update came out, I did again the freaking update and boom again the same problem only this time I refused to reinstall OSX (I deny to see myself reinstalling OSX every single time I had to update iTunes). Fortunately I found a fix candidate in this Macrumors thread (http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1109887) where some MacBook Airs were reporting a similar boot time slowdown after the users performed an iTunes Update. Here was there where one user got the suggested the *sudo chown root:admin /* command:
    http://rifers.org/blogs/gbevin/2009/9/20/slowstartupshutdownsnowleopard

    I had hold off my 10.6.7 update pending a before update permissions fix and time machine backup to keep my computer from running into more troubles that I am already had.

    Thank you for your understanding and suggestions
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (164,415 points)
    I suggest you keep two things in mind when Googling for solutions to computer problems:

    (1) There are a lot more people on the Internet who like to give advice than there are people who actually know what they're talking about.

    (2) One of the most common logical errors of the human mind is +post hoc ergo propter hoc+ -- "after this, therefore because of this." I ran some random shell command and rebooted, then my problem went away, so it must have been the shell command. In reality, if I had instead sacrificed a chicken to Shango and rebooted, the result would have been the same. That happens often.
  • mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Linc Davis wrote:
    I suggest you keep two things in mind when Googling for solutions to computer problems:

    (1) There are a lot more people on the Internet who like to give advice than there are people who actually know what they're talking about.

    (2) One of the most common logical errors of the human mind is +post hoc ergo propter hoc+ -- "after this, therefore because of this." I ran some random shell command and rebooted, then my problem went away, so it must have been the shell command. In reality, if I had instead sacrificed a chicken to Shango and rebooted, the result would have been the same. That happens often.

    Well about that I did rebooted multiple times after the permissions fixes and in the first two instances my issues did not went away, after running that command it worked, yet I will run DU and repair permissions on my mac before the OSX update and see what happens. Anyways it seems that the command I evoked is a serious one, due to the tone of the two replies am I right?
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (164,415 points)
    Anything with 'sudo' in front of it is serious. But it's not what solved your problem. If you had already repaired permissions with DU, then it didn't change anything.
  • mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Linc Davis wrote:
    Anything with 'sudo' in front of it is serious. But it's not what solved your problem. If you had already repaired permissions with DU, then it didn't change anything.

    Maybe I forgot to explain the rest of the story, and thats why you may think that the command has not worked by itself; besides that command I ran these other two making a total of three commands, maybe the fix was in one of the following:

    sudo chown root:admin /
    sudo kextcache -system-prelinked-kernel
    sudo kextcache -system-caches

    Perhaps one of the latter made the trick. What do you think? I will istall 10.6.7 tonight after the permissions fix that I plan to use.

    In the post below is the technical explanation...
    http://rifers.org/blogs/gbevin/2009/9/20/slowstartupshutdownsnowleopard
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (164,415 points)
    +Perhaps one of the latter made the trick. What do you think?+

    Rebuilding the kernel caches could certainly make a difference if for some reason it wasn't done by the installer, as it should have been. But you shouldn't do it by invoking kextcache directly. Instead, do this:
    sudo touch /System/Library/Extensions
  • mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Linc Davis wrote:
    +Perhaps one of the latter made the trick. What do you think?+

    Rebuilding the kernel caches could certainly make a difference if for some reason it wasn't done by the installer, as it should have been. But you shouldn't do it by invoking kextcache directly. Instead, do this:
    sudo touch /System/Library/Extensions

    What that command does? Sorry for not writing the whole story.

    It seems that the iTunes update is doing something to the kernel caches, and make the default to the user rather than the root, that might explain the slowdown in bootime.
  • Tony T1 Level 6 Level 6 (8,805 points)
    sudo chown root:admin /


    If you type: "ls -ld /", you should see: "drwxrwxr-t@ root admin"
    If not, try: "chmod 1775 /"
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (164,415 points)
    See the kextcache man page for more information. I ran the iTunes updater, and it didn't cause any such problems for me.
  • mikey110 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Well I ran the update via SU. Main Page? where's the info on kextcache...
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (164,415 points)
    The man page is the UNIX manual page that describes the command. You shouldn't run any shell command unless you've read and understood that information. To access it, open a Terminal window and enter 'man command-name', or in this case, 'man kextcache'. Use the space bar to move forward and type q to quit, or just close the window. Another way to read man pages is to install a reader application such as ManOpen or Bwana.
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