8 Replies Latest reply: Apr 1, 2011 7:34 PM by Kyn Drake
Redsoblue Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
So in our house it is wife/iPad vs husband/Xoom.

He read about using RainX on the glass screen to improve touch sensitivity and reduce smudges. He will try it on the Xoom.

Has anyone heard about this?

Can this be used on the iPad screen? No way do I want to ruin my screen!

So far the #1 pet peeve on my iPad vs his Xoom is the keyboard. He was able to replace his native keyboard with a new one that includes arrow keys.

The iPad OiS however is much faster!

iPad 2 Wifi 32GB, iOS 4
  • pvonk Level 6 Level 6 (13,695 points)
    If RainX is a liquid, don't use it on the iPad. The pad has a special coating that can be compromised with liquid cleaners.

    The iPad has no cursor, thus arrow keys are not compatible. (It has in insertion point, which is not a cursor.)

    On another note, if you have a chance to really use the Xoom a lot, we'd love to hear your comparisons.
  • varjak paw Level 10 Level 10 (169,820 points)
    I would strongly recommend not using any such substance on your iPad's screen. I highly doubt that it will improve matters, the iPad already having an oleophobic coating, and such substances may cause problems with the screen. I've had two iPads for over a year and have no problems with smudges; a quick wipe with a microfiber cloth (such as is used to clean eyeglasses) is sufficient.

    As to arrow keys, I know that this is a controversial topic, but I don't miss them except in rare circumstances. Everyone has his or her own preferences and needs, though.

    Regards.
  • Johnathan Burger Level 6 Level 6 (15,445 points)
    My experience is iOS does not need arrow keys, while android desperately needs them.
    I had an android phone and have a 7" tablet-text entry is a nightmare on both(at least for me).

    To the OP:
    put nothing on the screen.
    Especially liquids.
  • Redsoblue Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    Thanks for the feedback. No RainX for me then.

    Will post more on the differences we are finding between the iPad and Xoom.
  • Dadof2Girls Level 3 Level 3 (545 points)
    I wouldn't use Rain X. Maybe if you had a protective screen cover you could try it on that, but not on the oleophobic coating directly. Why not use KlearScreen? It's what I use and it is awesome. Supposedly recommended by Apple to boot.

    http://www.klearscreen.com/Default.aspx

    Q. Why are Klear Screen and iKlear the most recommended screen cleaners?
    A. Klear Screen and iKlear are the only Screen Cleaners used, sold, or recommended by Apple, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, Panasonic, Samsung, and ViewSonic. The Klear Screen and iKlear formula's anti-static, alcohol and ammonia-free properties allow you to safely clean, protect, and preserve your LCD, Plasma, HDTV, Big Screen TV, and CRT displays. Klear Screen is also safe to use on your iPods, Digital Cameras and Camcorders, Scanners, PDA's, GPS Screens, Portable DVD Players, DVD's, and CD's.

    Q. What makes the Klear Screen and iKlear solution different from other screen cleaners?
    A. Klear Screen is a state-of-the-art cleaner for precision and multi-coated optics and is internationally recognized for its unique, non-damaging, alcohol and ammonia-free formula. Klear Screen and iKlear use the same unique formula, which safely cleans and replenishes your screen surface with a non-toxic, non-damaging, liquid polymer-based solution. Our solution lifts and dissolves surface contaminants, fingerprints, and floating debris off the screen surface leaving an anti-static coating, which dramatically reduces surface friction, resists fingerprinting and provides a renewable protective screen barrier.
  • Redsoblue Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    RainX is not always a liquid. It ends up on a barely damp cloth. But I won't be using it just in case.

    Thanks all.
  • Michael Black Level 6 Level 6 (17,890 points)
    RainX has several polysiloxanates in it, dissolved in alcohol as well as other chemicals. I would never apply it to a factory coated display screen on any electronics, especially a factory coated touch screen. The odds that you will mess up the screen, and perhaps find your warranty voided in doing so are likely pretty high.

    It's components are also toxic and can be strong skin irritants as well.
  • Kyn Drake Level 7 Level 7 (21,500 points)
    Want to show him something cool? Take a microfiber cloth (like the one that comes with the iPad), lightly moisten it with ordinary water, show him the screen all covered with fingerprints and smudges, and show him how the oleophobic coating makes all the finger oils wipe clean away.