2 Replies Latest reply: Apr 22, 2011 1:05 PM by LilyLC
johnnyfoxx Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

So this story begins 2 years ago: I purchased a brand new MacBook Pro 15" to replace my well-worn 17" G4 Powerbook.  Out of the box, it didn't seem "super-fast", but I figured it must've been me.  After about a week or so, I added some RAM (giving it 4GB) and figured "Now I'll be fine".

 

No such luck. 

 

Lots of slowing down...which was primarily shown by our fav "spinning beach ball".  So after about 3 months, I brought it into the Apple Store where I had purchased it.  They agreed...something was up.  They replaced the HD and sent me on my way.  I'm thinking..."I'm all set".

 

No such luck.

 

The above scenario occurred another FIVE times...with a total of FOUR Hard Drives being replaced, software updates, other hardware replaced, head scratching, etc.  Finally, after the fifth and last time...with the problem STILL there, Apple helped out and replaced my computer (under warranty). 

 

Finally I would have my fast, new laptop.

 

No such luck!

 

Now, after only 5 weeks of having my brand new i7 MacBook Pro, I'm getting the same results: spinning wheel, slow, unresponsive performance. 

The Disk Utility reads the following:

 

Invalid volume file count

(It should be 822882 instead of 822883)

Invalid volume file count

(It should be 286900 instead of 286899)

The volume Macintosh HD was found corrupt and needs to be repaired.

Error: This disk needs to be repaired. Start up your computer with another disk (such as your Mac OS X installation disc), and then use Disk Utility to repair this disk.

And I cannot "Repair" from the app (it remains grayed-out once this message appears).

 

So NOW I have no idea what to do!  As a photographer, I move HUGE amounts of data on and off from external HDs to the laptop.  My thinking is to back everything up and re-install everything I need...but not from a Time Machine back-up or Migration Assistant.  My big concern is making sure all of my emails stay in tact and on the system plus all my bookmarks from Safari.  I also have had essentially the same computer since my 17" G4 Powerbook (I've brought over from one to the next).  So I've got lots of preferences and other settings that have been the same for quite some time. 

 

But at this point, before I go ahead and do this, I want to see if anyone out there has a suggestion.  If you do, I'd really appreciate it.  Maybe I'm doing something or perhaps you can see a clue in the Disk Utility log that would provide a solution.

 

One last thing: Apple Support has been nothing short of incredible during this.  From the very first visit to the Store, conversations on the phone with me, follow-up and follow-thru; they have been terrific.  For anyone who is a non-Mac user reading this, you could never even dream of getting service like this from a PC maker (no names, but we all know who they are!).  So my hat is off to the Cupertino Crew!

 

Thanks for reading!

JF


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • a brody Level 9 Level 9 (64,125 points)

    Welcome to Apple Discussions!

    When you are booted off the hard drive, you can't repair the same hard drive from the graphical user interface level.

    You can only repair its permissions from the graphical user interface level.

    That's normal.  You need to boot off an operating system CD, to actually repair from Disk Utility.

    The first screen after you select the language has a Utilities menu, where you can pick Disk Utility.

    Once you can see if you can repair that way, if it doesn't work, backup your data*:

     

    http://www.macmaps.com/backup.html

     

    Purchase Alsoft Disk Warrior.

     

    See then if it can repair the hard drive.

     

    Note, if you get your hard drive too full*:

     

    http://www.macmaps.com/diskfull.html

     

    That can damage the directory, which is what Repair Disk & Disk Warrior specialize at.  That is completely different from Permissions.

  • LilyLC Level 4 Level 4 (2,635 points)

    johnnyfoxx wrote:

    The Disk Utility reads the following:

     

    Invalid volume file count

    (It should be 822882 instead of 822883)

    Invalid volume file count

    (It should be 286900 instead of 286899)

    The volume Macintosh HD was found corrupt and needs to be repaired.

    Error: This disk needs to be repaired.

     

    In addition to a brody's post about Repair Disk from Disk Utility booted from the Install Disk... after it runs through its paces, it will try to find the "missing files." Just know that the "search" can take a while. (This has happened with my MBPro a few times and it ultimately created folders with the missing file numbers. No issues after the repairs.)

     

    I also have had essentially the same computer since my 17" G4 Powerbook (I've brought over from one to the next).  So I've got lots of preferences and other settings that have been the same for quite some time. 

     

    The culprit for many users has been the preferences from their PowerPC computers. If you do "re-install," consider leaving out your old preferences. Yes, you will then need to reset your preferences with the apps but those preferences will conincide with the Intel computer, OS and the respective apps for that computer.

     

    As for third-party apps, check the info to see if they are opening with Rosetta, which is also slower on an Intel Mac. (This last bit could be moot as I believe one has to manually install Rosetta with Snow Lepoard.)

     

    HTH