9 Replies Latest reply: Aug 16, 2011 8:04 AM by jhs217 Branched to a new discussion.
johnnycakes Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

Hi everyone,

 

This is the story so far:

 

MacBook Air Rev A from 2008.

 

Made funny clicky sounds from the start - worrying noises from the HDD.  Nothing bad happened so I didn't do anything about them.

 

A few weeks ago - hard disk failure.

 

Took it into the Genius Bar and they put a new one in.

 

When I got home, restored from my Time Machine backup, then the same clicking started again.

 

Took it back to the Genius Bar, the replaced the HDD again and also replaced the logic board (thinking this might be the cause of the HDD failures).

 

Got it home, restored from my Time Machine backup, then it suddently started operating *extremely* slowly - System Prefs wouldn't open, volume buttons wouldn't work - then they would catch up after a minute.  So I rebooted.  Got my desktop, but no dock, menu bar, nothing: just the cursor.  Rebooted again.  Grey screen, Apple logo, spinning wheel for a long time - then a blue screen - then the grey screen and Apple logo again with a spinning wheel that was stuck - then a blue screen again - then a very dark grey screen (I could still see - and move - the cursor) - then blue screen - then grey screen and Appole logo again with the stuck spinning wheel - repeat, repeat, repeat etc.  Reboot.  Exactly the same again.  Reboot.  Exactly the same again.

 

Any thoughts??

 

I videoed it if anyone would like to see.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

JC

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,550 points)

    Reinstall OS X:

     

    Reinstall OS X without erasing the drive

     

    Do the following:

     

    1. Repair the Hard Drive and Permissions

     

    Boot from your Snow Leopard Installer disc. After the installer loads select your language and click on the Continue button. When the menu bar appears select Disk Utility from the Utilities menu. After DU loads select your hard drive entry (mfgr.'s ID and drive size) from the the left side list.  In the DU status area you will see an entry for the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard drive.  If it does not say "Verified" then the hard drive is failing or failed. (SMART status is not reported on external Firewire or USB drives.) If the drive is "Verified" then select your OS X volume from the list on the left (sub-entry below the drive entry,) click on the First Aid tab, then click on the Repair Disk button. If DU reports any errors that have been fixed, then re-run Repair Disk until no errors are reported. If no errors are reported click on the Repair Permissions button. Wait until the operation completes, then quit DU and return to the installer.

     

    If DU reports errors it cannot fix, then you will need Disk Warrior and/or Tech Tool Pro to repair the drive. If you don't have either of them or if neither of them can fix the drive, then you will need to reformat the drive and reinstall OS X.

     

    2. Reinstall Snow Leopard

     

    If the drive is OK then quit DU and return to the installer.  Proceed with reinstalling OS X.  Note that the Snow Leopard installer will not erase your drive or disturb your files.  After installing a fresh copy of OS X the installer will move your Home folder, third-party applications, support items, and network preferences into the newly installed system.

     

    Download and install the Combo Updater for the version you prefer from support.apple.com/downloads/.

     

    If you are using an earlier version of OS X then reinstall using this:

     

    How to Perform an Archive and Install

     

    An Archive and Install will NOT erase your hard drive, but you must have sufficient free space for a second OS X installation which could be from 3-9 GBs depending upon the version of OS X and selected installation options. The free space requirement is over and above normal free space requirements which should be at least 6-10 GBs. Read all the linked references carefully before proceeding.

     

    1. Be sure to use Disk Utility first to repair the disk before performing the Archive and Install.

     

    Repairing the Hard Drive and Permissions

     

    Boot from your OS X Installer disc. After the installer loads select your language and click on the Continue button. When the menu bar appears select Disk Utility from the Installer menu (Utilities menu for Tiger, Leopard or Snow Leopard.) After DU loads select your hard drive entry (mfgr.'s ID and drive size) from the the left side list. In the DU status area you will see an entry for the S.M.A.R.T. status of the hard drive. If it does not say "Verified" then the hard drive is failing or failed. (SMART status is not reported on external Firewire or USB drives.) If the drive is "Verified" then select your OS X volume from the list on the left (sub-entry below the drive entry,) click on the First Aid tab, then click on the Repair Disk button. If DU reports any errors that have been fixed, then re-run Repair Disk until no errors are reported. If no errors are reported click on the Repair Permissions button. Wait until the operation completes, then quit DU and return to the installer. Now restart normally.

    If DU reports errors it cannot fix, then you will need Disk Warrior and/or Tech Tool Pro to repair the drive. If you don't have either of them or if neither of them can fix the drive, then you will need to reformat the drive and reinstall OS X.

    2. Do not proceed with an Archive and Install if DU reports errors it cannot fix. In that case use Disk Warrior and/or TechTool Pro to repair the hard drive. If neither can repair the drive, then you will have to erase the drive and reinstall from scratch.

    3. Boot from your OS X Installer disc. After the installer loads select your language and click on the Continue button. When you reach the screen to select a destination drive click once on the destination drive then click on the Option button. Select the Archive and Install option. You have an option to preserve users and network preferences. Only select this option if you are sure you have no corrupted files in your user accounts. Otherwise leave this option unchecked. Click on the OK button and continue with the OS X Installation.

    4. Upon completion of the Archive and Install you will have a Previous System Folder in the root directory. You should retain the PSF until you are sure you do not need to manually transfer any items from the PSF to your newly installed system.

    5. After moving any items you want to keep from the PSF you should delete it. You can back it up if you prefer, but you must delete it from the hard drive.

    6. You can now download a Combo Updater directly from Apple's download site to update your new system to the desired version as well as install any security or other updates. You can also do this using Software Update.

  • johnnycakes Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Thanks Kappy, will give it a go.  Is it not a bit fishy what with all the problems I've been having though?  I'm kinda feeling like my machine is a turkey?

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,550 points)

    After 3 years and just a hard drive failure? That's hardly what I would call a "turkey."

  • johnnycakes Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    No, not just a hard drive failure - two hard drive failures (one of which was brand new), a new logic board and now a computer that won't boot the first time I try and use it after the repairs.

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,550 points)

    All in all I'd return it where it was repaired and have them set it straight for you while the repair work is still in warranty.

  • Knifedge Level 4 Level 4 (1,605 points)

    Sounds like the common thread is the time machine backup. I would try doing a clean install of Mac OS X. I recommend installing the bare minumum. The non-SSD MBA hard drive isn't very fast or big.

  • johnnycakes Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Just to update you all on the situation and close the discussion - I called and spoke to the manager of the Apple Store who authorised a straight swap for a new MacBook Air (which I'm currently writing this on).  An appropriate, if extremely generous, solution.  Happy days!

  • jhs217 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi johnnycakes,  I have just (within past month) encountered the exact same symptoms as you with my Rev A macbook air.  Genius bar told me that my hard drive failed and wanted $160 to replace it.  I know it's not the HDD because it will eventually boot up and I even copied off all my files to back them up.  I had an authorized repair facility replace the HDD with a new one and now have the exact same issues.  I'm in Dallas, TX.  Can you give me any insight or contacts to help seek your resolution?  My wife uses this computer for school, and we are SOL right now .  Thank you very much for any help you can give.  I couldn't find a way to message you directly, if you can and are willing, please email me at gto182 (at) gmail.com

     

    Thanks again,

    Jeff

  • jhs217 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Can you help me?