Previous 1 47 48 49 50 51 Next 2,266 Replies Latest reply: Mar 28, 2014 2:35 AM by WSR Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • AjTeX Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    This is the link to the download for fix  http://rys.pixeltards.com/2011/09/04/osx-lion-wifi.html

  • lupunus Level 3 Level 3 (995 points)

    Cambo III wrote:

     

    Now, whenever the computer is put to sleep. it drops the wi-fi connection and it takes up to 25 seconds to reconnect after waking. [...]

     

    (10 feet away, through one flimsy gyproc wall)

    Cambo,

     

    What you call a "flimsy gyproc wall" can be a harsh obstacle for radio signals, because:

    • Plaster walls contain moisture and water is a big bar for radio
    • Gyproc walls are set up on a metal frame between the plates. That metal frame is like a "Faraday shield" for radio.

    Both effects decrease the strength of your base stations radio signal remarkably. Try to find a better place for your router.

     

    For the wake up problem you might check that your wireless is on top of the list of the known networks in the system settings of your Mac.

     

    If you run Lion as a an upgrade version from former OS X 10.6.8 the following steps may help you as some configuration files may get damaged or corrupt by time, after updates or upgrades and should get deleted occasionally.

     

    Switch off wifi on the machine you want to tweak.

     

    Then go on and delete the files mentioned below.

    (If you are using Lion, the Library is hidden. You have to use (menu bar) "go to" -> "go to folder" on finder to access them.)

    You will find the files on your system drive (not your home folder) as follow:

     

    /library/preferences/com.apple.preferences.accounts.plist

    /library/preferences/com.apple.preferences.sharing.plist

    /library/preferences/SstemConfiguration/preferences.plist

    /library/preferences/SstemConfiguration/com.apple.airport.preferences.plist

     

    If there are files in this folders with the same name but additional .orig at the end, delete them too.

     

    It is possible that not all files are on your system. That will be ok. The files will get newly created by system on reboot.

     

    For that -> reboot the machine.

    Join your wireless again.

     

    Lupunus

  • lupunus Level 3 Level 3 (995 points)

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    It's an AT&T 2Wire router, but it doesn't appear to be the issue.  Even the Apple tech agree.

    I agree too. The router itself is seldom involved except of a few model's with strange preset's.

     

    The placement of the router could be an issue. Eventually you can fiddle a bit with the routers location.

    You may also check that there is not cordless phone base near the router or between the router and your Mac. Try to separate those stations from the router by placing them as far away from the router as possible.

     

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    My old Powerbook continues to work fine using this router for WiFi as do 2 iPhones, 2 iPads and an older iMac. As I wrote previously, when I go to Network Diagnostics, all the lights are green except "internet and server" at the bottom.

    The Network Diagnostics are no help with this issue as that tool only checks the connection regardless of the signal quality or strength.

     

    You should use the build in "Wireless Diagnostics" from Lion to find out more about the signal strengh, quality and also interferences in the wireless.

    See here -> http://macs.about.com/od/LionTipsNtricks/qt/Os-X-Lion-Wi-Fi-Diagnostics.htm

     

    If you had upgrade the 10.7 from a previous 10.6.8 you should eventually also following the steps in the posting before that one and delete the old configuration files.

     

     

    Lupunus

  • Sandpuppy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    Lupunus,

    Did all this, e.g., removed preferences, with the Apple tech... didn't work.  I'm not a techie so I don't really know all the in's/out's and follow the advice of the Apple tech who said she was as "high as I could go" in Apple support.  She passed all my info to the engineers?  Ergo, i don't know much about the config files ans am loathe to delete stuff without some direct knowledge of what I'm doing.  As for signal strenth and quality, I'll check out your link but can tell you the WiFi modem is 5 ft from my desktop, clean line of sight.  The signal is good enough to reach my iPhone/iPad on my driveway, 2 floors away and 90 ft. away.  Interferences? I have wireless phones and have tried moving, disconnecting without any improvement. 

    I'm running a late '09 (bought new 6/10) 27" iMac i5 Quad Core.

  • lupunus Level 3 Level 3 (995 points)

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    Lupunus,

    Did all this, e.g., removed preferences, with the Apple tech... didn't work.

    Sad news, indeed.

     

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    I'll check out your link but can tell you the WiFi modem is 5 ft from my desktop, clean line of sight.  The signal is good enough to reach my iPhone/iPad on my driveway, 2 floors away and 90 ft. away.

    Free line of sight and the other units having a clear connection two floors away indicate that the router settings and place will be o.k. Eventually the tool will show you additional information about the wifi on the machine in question.

    Sandpuppy wrote:

    As I wrote previously, when I go to Network Diagnostics, all the lights are green except "internet and server" at the bottom.

    Eventually a unlucky coincedence ocour while installing Lion and there is indeed a hardware problem. I read a few reports about bad connection of the antennas at iMac's.

    That may eventually explain that the diagnostics shows no connection to server (router) although the wifi chipset works well.

     

    Are there any informations in the Network Utility about the wireless?

    Is the interface listed in the System Profiler?

     

     

    Lupunus

  • Sandpuppy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    tried to delete as the graph showing -20 signal and -99 interference wouldn't attach.

  • lupunus Level 3 Level 3 (995 points)

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    tried to delete as the graph showing -20 signal and -99 interference wouldn't attach.

    That values are for calculating the SNR (signal to noise ratio) and indicate a very low noise (-100 means nearly zero noise) but a weak signal (-20) too.

     

    In your case at -99 noise a signal reported around -60  (40 db difference) would be a perfect (full 5 bars) wireless signal.

     

    Lupunus

  • Sandpuppy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    So, it could be a weak signal?  The router is 5' away from the computer, in clear view? I'd add that even when I corrected directly with an ethernet cable, the signal continued to drop on a fairly regular basis, every 10-15".

  • lupunus Level 3 Level 3 (995 points)

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    So, it could be a weak signal?

    Not could be. Your reported signat value (-20) tell clearly that it is a weak signal.

     

    Sandpuppy wrote:

     

    I'd add that even when I corrected directly with an ethernet cable, the signal continued to drop on a fairly regular basis, every 10-15".

    If the signal drop at this rhythm in a Ethernet (cable) connection, there must be a problem in the net that force the station to disassociate (or get disassociated by the router) from the network.

     

    That makes definitively clear that not the evil Lion is the reason.

     

    You should monitor the network traffic with a tool like WireShark and compare the output for the times the drop occur with the router log to find out which event forces the station to disassociate.

     

    See it as a challenge. You will learn a lot about networks and how computer communicate while doing that.

     

     

    Lupunus

  • benjikan Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Apple are aware of this problem and are remining silent.  This is totally unacceptable behavior from a company that prides itself on service!!!

  • Sandpuppy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    First, the dropping is not "regular", it's just frequent.  I suppose it's clear the signal is weak, but that doesn't have any effect on my iPad or iPhones over 90' away though several walls. Nor does it effect my old Powerbook or the wife's iMac running Tiger.  That there are some many others experiencing this issue, i simply can't dismiss that it is Lion.  Something perhaps has created an increased sensitivity in Airport.

    (Card Type:          AirPort Extreme  (0x168C, 0x8F)

      Firmware Version:          Atheros 9280: 4.0.55.4-P2P)

  • kiwirich Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    All - try turning off all other wireless transmitting devices in your home (cordless phones, doorbells etc) and try different wireless channels on your router (try 1, 6 or 11) to rule out inteference. 

     

    I had constant drop outs a few weeks back on my new iMac and changing the channel on my home router (from 1 to 11) solved the issue.  All has been well for a few weeks.  Strangely, my wireless door bell on our house stopped working (thinking back it was around the same time as I changed the channel on the router but I didn't pick up on it till now).  Once I finally got around to looking at why the doorbell stopped working and did a reset on the doorbell's receiver unit, my wireless on my iMac started constantly dropping out.  I changed the wireless router channel from 11 to 6 and all has been fine again for the past two days.  Wireless inteference can be a major factor!  

  • Sandpuppy Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    Been there, done that.  No wireless doorbell, wireless phones unplugged, changed channel to 11.  Again, if this stuff mattered, it didn't matter until I downloaded LION.

  • moskovit Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Looks like I spoke too soon in praising Lupunus's "2 BSSID" solution.  Like many solutions I've read on this thread, it seemed to work for awhile—a week, in this case—and then it stopped working.  Once again, my MacBook Pro became slow to re-connect to wi-fi from sleep.

     

    I was reluctant to try downgrading the kext, explained at http://rys.pixeltards.com/2011/09/04/osx-lion-wifi.html because I read that that solution is appropriate only for Atheros chipsets, as opposed to Broadcom chipsets, the latter of which my MacBook Pro has.  But out of desperation, I tried implementing the kext downgrade solution and de-implementing Lupunus's "2 BSSID" solution (quoted below).

     

    To my surprise, the kext downgrade solution didn't mess anything up, and, in fact, it may have solved the problem.  It's too early to tell, because it's only been an hour or so, but so far, wi-fi is re-connecting instantly on wake from sleep.  I'll try to remember to give an update after a week or two to see whether the solution sticks.

     

    A couple of questions:

     

    1. A question for anyone: It was previously reported that the kext downgrade works only for Atheros chipsets (note that I installed the kext that I downloaded from the link above, about which the author writes, "only have a go if your Mac has Atheros Wi-Fi hardware!").  I have a Broadcom chipset, and the kext downgrade seems to have worked for me (at the very least, it didn't mess anything up).  What's the deal?  Is the author wrong that the kext is appropriate only for Atheros chipsets?

     

    2. A question for Lupunus: Though you refuse the title, I still think you're a genius (or at least very smart), as well as very generous (though admittedly harsh).  But I haven't seen you post anything about the kext downgrade solution (perhaps I missed it).  Instead, you provide solutions that are tailored to each user's configuration, without reference to the kext.  I'm curious: What you think about the kext downgrade solution?  Do you reject/ignore it because you are convinced that the wi-fi problems people are experiencing have nothing to do with Lion?

     

    And now, Lupunus, a reply to your last reply to me:

    lupunus wrote:

     

    As a matter of fact it's also clear, that in 99.9% of the reported problems neither Lion

    nor Apple or Windows is responsible for the problem.

    ...

    If one integrate a correct configured Mac in a correct designed and configured wireless network, the system will run seamlessly in that environment.

    if this where not fact, the several millions of Lion users had ALL experienced a wireless disaster.

     

    I'm trying to avoid getting personal here, Lupunus, but I'm concerned that your personal biases might be leading people astray with many of your suggestions.  As I said, I get the sense that you're extremely bright, knowledgeable, and generous with your suggestions.  But it strikes me as incredibly presumptuous for you to claim you know it to be a fact that "99.9% of the reported problems neither Lion nor Apple or Windows is responsible for the problem."  Just because the problem doesn't affect all Lion users doesn't mean that Lion isn't the problem.  And just because lots of people have wi-fi problems with each OS version upgrade doesn't mean that those OS versions aren't responsible for their problems.  I myself saw a very clear correlation in time between when I upgraded to Lion and when the wi-fi problems began.  So did many others in this discussion.  For you to imply that we're all wrong or that these are all just coincidences strikes me as incredibly arrogant.

     

    I would let it go, except that I and many others in this discussion are spending quite a bit of time reading, implementing, and replying to your suggestions.  If you were more humble and open-minded to the possibility that Lion might, at least in some cases, be the problem, then I would put a lot more credence in your suggestions.  But given your apparent arrogance and closed-mindedness, I am concerned that you may be wasting many people's time.  And I know I'm not alone, because I'm far from the first person to point out your haughtiness in this and other Apple discussions. 

     

    My suggestion, for what it's worth, is that you ask a few people you trust to be honest with you whether they can understand how others might perceive you as arrogant—and do a bit of soul-searching—before continuing to participate in these discussions.

     

    moskovit wrote:

     

    Wow! Lupunus, you are the only person on this forum who has provided a solution that's worked for me, and I tried many, many of the solutions offered on this forum.   My wi-fi has worked perfectly for about a week since I implemented your solution.  You are a genuis, and a saint

     

    (That said, I must say, Lupunus, that I do, at times, feel that you are needlessly harsh with people who are understandably frustrated with Apple and come here to vent their frustration.  Your solution did solve my problem, but that doesn't change the fact that the problem began precisely when I upgraded to Lion.  I would much prefer that Apple fix these problems quickly than me having to spend hours on this forum and tinker with esoteric settings, and so I commend people for voicing their frustration, in an effort to get Apple to improve their software [though it's not clear to me whether Apple employees actually read these forums].  So I appreciate your kindness in offering me a solution, and I would also appreciate you expressing a kinder attitude towards others on this forum.)

     

    For those of you experiencing a slow re-connect to wi-fi from sleep, you might try implementing Lupunus's solution (reprinted below), especially if you own a Time Machine (or another type of Airport router) like me.

     

    Thanks again, Lupunus, for your help!

     

    lupunus wrote:

     

    moskovit wrote:

     

    The problem I was experiencing is my MacBook Pro taking awhile to connect to wi-fi upon waking from sleep.  The problem started after I upgraded to Lion.  Resetting the time capsule to factory settings (via Airport Utility->Base Station drop-down menu->Restore Default Settings) solved this problem for a couple of days, but then the problem came back.

    Looks like the "2 BSSID" problem. See other posts here.

     

    • On TimeCapsule set a dedicated name (SSID) for the 5GHz wireless.
    screen-capture-18.png
    • If no iPone or iPod nano is connected to the TC, eventually set: 802.11n only (5GHz) - 802.11n only (2.4GHz).
    • If iPhone or older wireless system should get connected use: 802.11n only (5GHz) - 802.11b/g. You will reach that settings with holding option key (alt) while clicking on the dropdown menu.
    • Force the Mac to use the 5GHz SSID
    • Delete the other SSID's of your home wireless from the list of "known networks"
    • Eventually delete the keys pointing to them from keychain access
    • Uncheck "Ask to join new networks"
    • Reboot
    • Rejoin your wireless.

     

    moskovit wrote:


    1. Please don't post a solution unless you've tested it for at least a couple of days.  Otherwise, you may be giving false hope and inspiring people to waste time trying things that don't actually work.

     

    2. Please specify how many days you have been problem-free since implementing a solution.

    Tested on own wireless with Airport Extreme (same as TC but no hard disk) on 7.5.2, 2011 MBPro on 10.6.8, 2008 MacBook 10.6.8, WindowsXPPro SP3, 4 AP-Express (7.5.2), 2010 MBook (customer) on 10.7.1.

     

    Extreme up without problems now for 48D 1h 43m, MBPro uptime 23D 14h 23m, WinXP ocasionally online, Expresses uptime same as Router, Uptime customers MBook 11 days.

     

    Lupunus

  • lupunus Level 3 Level 3 (995 points)

    moskovit wrote:

     

    2. A question for Lupunus: [..] I haven't seen you post anything about the kext downgrade solution (perhaps I missed it).[...] What you think about the kext downgrade solution?  Do you reject/ignore it because you are convinced that the wi-fi problems people are experiencing have nothing to do with Lion?

    I did not ignore it and there may be eventually situations on which a downgrade of a Kernel extension could be a solution, indeed.

     

    However, it changes the design of the OS and may cause unforeseeable problems with other functions of the OS or it did not resolve the reason for the issue as such.

     

    Imagine that there are several millions of Lion users out there. I guess at least 90% of them are connected to a network, probably the majority on a wireless. If there where a major issue with Lion on wireless, we definitively would know about.

     

    As I could see on the last developer version of 10.7.2 there where NO changes in the wireless stack.

    That is confirmed by reports of people having installed the 10.7.2, hoping that will solve there wireless problems. Guess what, it did not.

     

    By the way ... there where the exact same discussions on Tiger, Leopard and Snow Leopard about wireless problems.

    Take a look by copying that line into Google:

    apple 10.6. wireless problem site:discussions.apple.com

     

    You will find 82.900 hits only for this community.

     

    Lupunus

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