Previous 1 72 73 74 75 76 Next 2,643 Replies Latest reply: Dec 5, 2013 6:55 AM by Nickofari Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    I'm still experiencing a battery drain of about 1% every 2 hours in sleep mode even with every user logged off.

     

    Therefore I don't think battery calibration is a real solution to this issue but just something impacting a bit the overall battery performance.

     

    In my personal experience I've got around 45 minutes to 1 hour more of battery life time, but I should also think about that I wasn't visiting any web page with multimedia content —such as quicktime or html5 videos— during my last battery test session.

     

    Therefore this improvement of battery life can be related more to the usage than to the battery calibration, at least in my case.

     

    @di1n: I think I'm still a "troubled person", and you should have another coffee  break with the Apple engeenier. This time, please, make sure you're gonna have a real italian espresso; thus probably the issue will be fixed a little faster LOL!

  • McFunson Level 1 (0 points)

    Sounds like a slight improvement (better than nothing I suppose!)

     

    I know it was mentioned earlier on in this thread but do you have a link to any guide for recalibrating the battery?

     

    I may as well do this whilst waiting for Apple to pull their finger out.

     

    Cheers

  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    McFunson wrote:

     

    Sounds like a slight improvement (better than nothing I suppose!)

     

    I know it was mentioned earlier on in this thread but do you have a link to any guide for recalibrating the battery?

     

    I may as well do this whilst waiting for Apple to pull their finger out.

     

    Cheers

     

    The official Apple's tech doc is this one: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1490


    To me it doesn't make sense still, cause if a battery is pre-calibrated (as the ones shipping nowadays) and kept in well excersize as stated in this other Apple document it doesn't need any calibration.

     

    Moreover theorically that has nothing to do with an OS upgrade: it's just avoiding any "memory effect*" in the battery on hardware extent.

     

    Thus the issue is still there, cause under SL during sleep time the battery drain would not be so bad as is with Lion —let me say that again: I'm losing 1% of battery charge every hour of sleep time under Lion, while with SL I was losing that percentage of battery charge in around 8hrs of sleep.

     

    *probably "state of charge mismatch" is a more appropriate term. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-ion_polymer_battery

  • Csound1 Level 8 (46,965 points)

    Rayced wrote:

     

    McFunson wrote:

     

    Sounds like a slight improvement (better than nothing I suppose!)

     

    I know it was mentioned earlier on in this thread but do you have a link to any guide for recalibrating the battery?

     

    I may as well do this whilst waiting for Apple to pull their finger out.

     

    Cheers

     

    The official Apple's tech doc is this one: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1490


    To me it doesn't make sense still, cause if a battery is pre-calibrated (as the ones shipping nowadays) and kept in well excersize as stated in this other Apple document it doesn't need any calibration.

     

    Moreover theorically that has nothing to do with an OS upgrade: it's just avoiding any "memory effect*" in the battery on hardware extent.

     

    LiOn & LiPoly batteries have no 'memory effect' you are 10 years out of date

  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    Probaly you can quote my message in full and find out that at the very end I've specified about that term.

    But it seems you're trying just to flame this thread. Aren't you?

     

    BTW and for what it worths "real battery memory effect" was happenng only on satellites… Not on planet earth LOL.

     

    Cheers from the "10 yrs out of date one".

  • Csound1 Level 8 (46,965 points)

    "it's just avoiding any "memory effect*" in the battery on hardware"

     

    Show me how that is not just incorrect advice.

  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    I've specified and linked a page about state of charge mismatch which can occour on lithium-ion polymer later in that post. People would refer to that phenomenom as "battery memory", commonly speaking.

    Csound1 wrote:

     

    "it's just avoiding any "memory effect*" in the battery on hardware"

     

    Show me how that is not just incorrect advice.

     

    BTW you are just confrming my original thesis that battery calibration is not necessary with pre-calibrated batteries (Lithium-ion polymer).

    And to make things even clearer I'm not giving any advice anyone coming from anything else than what is written on Apple official documents.

     

    I've linked plenty one of these official Apple document about how to keep laptop batteries well functional: http://www.apple.com/batteries/notebooks.html

     

    PS nice try, btw. Goodbye.

     

    Message was edited by: Rayced

  • Csound1 Level 8 (46,965 points)

    Rayced wrote:

     

    I've specified and linked a page about state of charge mismatch which can occour on lithium-ion polymer later in that post. People would refer to that phenomenom as "battery memory", commonly speaking.

    Csound1 wrote:

     

    "it's just avoiding any "memory effect*" in the battery on hardware"

     

    Show me how that is not just incorrect advice.

     

    BTW you are just confrming my original thesis that battery calibration is not necessary with pre-calibrated batteries (Lithium-ion polymer).

    And to make things even clearer I'm not giving any advice anyone coming from anything else than what is written on Apple official documents.

     

    I've linked plenty one of these official Apple document about how to keep laptop batteries well functional: http://www.apple.com/batteries/notebooks.html

     

    PS nice try, btw. Goodbye.

     

    Message was edited by: Rayced

    This is what the article you linked to says about calibration

     

    "

    PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD), MacBook (all models), and MacBook Pro (all models)

    The battery calibration for the PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD) and any model of MacBook or MacBook Pro has been updated because of a new battery released with this computer. With these computers, follow these steps to calibrate your battery:

    1. Plug in the power adapter and fully charge your PowerBook's battery until the light ring or LED on the power adapter plug changes to green and the onscreen meter in the menu bar indicates that the battery is fully charged.
    2. Allow the battery to rest in the fully charged state for at least two hours. You may use your computer during this time as long as the adapter is plugged in.
    3. Disconnect the power adapter while the computer still on and start running the computer off battery power. You may use your computer during this time. When your battery gets low, the low battery warning dialog appears on the screen.
    4. At this point, save your work.  Continue to use your computer; when the battery gets very low, the computer will automatically go to sleep.
    5. Turn off the computer or allow it to sleep for five hours or more.
    6. Connect the power adapter and leave it connected until the battery is fully charged again.

     

    So much for "my original thesis that battery calibration is not necessary with pre-calibrated batteries (Lithium-ion polymer).

  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    1st: what you are quoting is not what we are talking about now: Apple guidelines for laptop batteries. Which is the last link I've put on: http://www.apple.com/batteries/notebooks.html

     

    2nd: what you are quoting down below:

    Csound1 wrote:

     

    PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD), MacBook (all models), and MacBook Pro (all models)

    The battery calibration for the PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD) and any model of MacBook or MacBook Pro has been updated because of a new battery released with this computer. With these computers, follow these steps to calibrate your battery:

    1. Plug in the power adapter and fully charge your PowerBook's battery until the light ring or LED on the power adapter plug changes to green and the onscreen meter in the menu bar indicates that the battery is fully charged.
    2. Allow the battery to rest in the fully charged state for at least two hours. You may use your computer during this time as long as the adapter is plugged in.
    3. Disconnect the power adapter while the computer still on and start running the computer off battery power. You may use your computer during this time. When your battery gets low, the low battery warning dialog appears on the screen.
    4. At this point, save your work.  Continue to use your computer; when the battery gets very low, the computer will automatically go to sleep.
    5. Turn off the computer or allow it to sleep for five hours or more.
    6. Connect the power adapter and leave it connected until the battery is fully charged again.

     

    So much for "my original thesis that battery calibration is not necessary with pre-calibrated batteries (Lithium-ion polymer).

    This is from another document about battery calibration. You —and others— talking about this technique, which is originally intended for Li-ion batteriesnot Li-ion Polymer !— the removeable ones, are always avoiding to fully quote the article which states:

     

     

    Portables with built-in batteries

    Current Apple portable computer batteries are pre-calibrated and do not require the calibration procedure outlined in this article. These computers use batteries that should be replaced only by an Apple Authorized Service Provider.

    MacBook 

    • MacBook (13-inch, Late 2009) and later

    MacBook Air

    • MacBook Air, all versions

    MacBook Pro

    • MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2009) and later
    • MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2009) and later
    • MacBook Pro (17-inch, Early 2009) and later

    Portables with removable batteries

    iBooks and PowerBook G4s other than the PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD)

    1. Plug the power adapter in and fully charge your computer's battery until the battery indicator lights turn off and the adapter plug light goes from amber to green, which indicates that the battery is fully charged.
    2. Disconnect the power adapter and use your iBook or PowerBook. When your battery gets low, you will see the low battery warning dialog on the screen. Continue to use your computer until it goes to sleep. At that point the battery has been sufficiently drained for calibration.
    3. Connect the power adapter and leave it connected until the battery is fully charged again.

    You have to fully charge and then discharge your battery only once to calibrate it. After that, you can connect and disconnect the power adapter when the battery is at any charge level.Tip: When the battery reaches "empty", the computer is forced into sleep mode. The battery actually holds a reserve beyond "empty", to maintain the computer in sleep for a period of time. Once the battery is truly exhausted, the computer is forced to shut down. At this point, any open files could be lost. Therefore, it is important that you find an electrical outlet and connect the adapter before the forced shutdown occurs.PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD), MacBook (all models), and MacBook Pro (all models) The battery calibration for the PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD) and any model of MacBook or MacBook Pro has been updated because of a new battery released with this computer. With these computers, follow these steps to calibrate your battery:

    1. Plug in the power adapter and fully charge your PowerBook's battery until the light ring or LED on the power adapter plug changes to green and the onscreen meter in the menu bar indicates that the battery is fully charged.
    2. Allow the battery to rest in the fully charged state for at least two hours. You may use your computer during this time as long as the adapter is plugged in.
    3. Disconnect the power adapter while the computer still on and start running the computer off battery power. You may use your computer during this time. When your battery gets low, the low battery warning dialog appears on the screen.
    4. At this point, save your work.  Continue to use your computer; when the battery gets very low, the computer will automatically go to sleep.
    5. Turn off the computer or allow it to sleep for five hours or more.
    6. Connect the power adapter and leave it connected until the battery is fully charged again.

     

     

    Now if only all of you would check carefully the impagination of this document, then probably you can understand that this part is dived in two parts, which we can identify by the two big headline:

     

    1. Portables with built-in batteries
    2. Portables with removable batteries

     

    Your quote is under the part about "removable batteries".

     

    Since reading more about Li-ion polymer batteries, will lead us to also encounter this notice:

     

    "Lithium Polymer batteries cannot be deep discharged. Once they are deep-discharged, they can be damaged and cannot be charged to their normal capacity. Even while discharging, care has to be taken to discharge the pack evenly."

     

    It's not clear enough if:

     

    • the part of the document http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1490 that you have quoted, which states about: "PowerBook G4 (15-inch Double-Layer SD), MacBook (all models), and MacBook Pro (all models)" was added later to that document, but in this case I don't see why they didn't remove the other part talking about pre-calibrated built-in batteries which do not need to be calibrated using this methods.
    • If using that technique will deep discharge a Li-Ion Polymer battery, resulting in a loss of overall battery capacity or otherwise will just let Li-Ion Polymer batteries do a full complete discharge/charge cycle.

     


  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    All of the above is about how to do "physical" maintence of laptop batteries in general.

     

    It does not explain why under Lion a laptop in sleep mode will lose 1% of battery charge every 2 hours, while under SL a laptop in sleep mode will lose 1% of battery charge in about 8 hrs.

     

    Therefore, there has to be a problem with Lion draining more battery than SL.

  • Csound1 Level 8 (46,965 points)

    The document I quoted is from your link, wake up.

  • terifromwinchester Level 1 (5 points)

    Come on boys and girls. All of us have the same needs/goals, for our Macs to work optimally. I love the advice of fellow Apple users, but really don't like the squabbling back and forth; it's just not necessary. We all get too many emails already and when one more is added by someone (an adult presumably) calling another "stupid" or equivalent, it serves no purpose for the rest of us just trying to be patient until our batteris will work like they used to.

     

    So, please ignore snide remarks, and better yet, don't post snide remarks.

     

    Thank you. Have a great day.

  • Franc_Iphone Level 1 (10 points)

    As you all know, I brought my MACBOOK Pro from new with LION installed. After spending 10 mins at the Genius bar today, they agreed to send me a free Snow Leopard install disk. Whilst waiting (an hour past my fiex appointment time), I sat at one of their brand new MACBook Pro's (LION), running nothing of any signifcants that showed about 6 hours after I unlugged it. After 5 mins it, just surfing with Iphoto running in back ground it dropped to 4 hours. That's just SAFARI and Iphoto! When I stopped Iphoto, it went back to about 6 hours.

  • Rayced Level 1 (15 points)

    Csound1 wrote:

     

    The document I quoted is from your link, wake up.

     

    Re: Lion - Horrible MacBook Pro Battery Life

     

    Re: Lion - Horrible MacBook Pro Battery Life

     

    People were claiming that they've solved their problems with that procedure. It doesn't solve it.

  • Ilhan Kudeki Level 1 (0 points)

    I created a new partition, installed OS X Lion on it from scratch, and now I'm browsing on Safari, having installed no flash and no applications.

     

    It's now estimating 3h45m to 4 hours. On my original setup I was seeing just a bit less than that. On Snow Leopard, it's 6-7 hours.

     

    Tell me there isn't a problem here.

     

    Update: about 30 minutes later it's at 82% battery life, giving me 3h10m estimate.  Past experience dictates that this will be pretty spot-on.

     

    I finished talking to Apple Technical Support on the phone again, and they've made me a Genius Bar appointment to swap in a new battery.  I agreed just to prove to them that it's an issue with the OS (plus, who knows how many charge cycles I've wasted with Lion's short battery life).

     

    I seriously wonder what they'll do when I prove to them that with a clean install, a new battery, no applications installed, no processor-intensive apps running, it's still just getting 4 hours.  I really wonder.

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