7 Replies Latest reply: Jan 18, 2006 7:27 AM by Dr. Smoke
the6mays Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
With my recent installation of Tiger I had to get rid of Norton Solutions. Do I need some virus protection with Tiger?

Is there a good Filtering program against bad sites?

Norton Solutions seemed to answer both of these issues.

THX!

G4, Mac OS X (10.4.3)
  • James Robson Level 1 Level 1 (60 points)
    Hey,

    That is a difficult question to answer - there aren't (unless I am much mistaken) any viruses that affect OS X Tiger yet. But that isn't to say there won't be. Viruses are less likely to affect the Mac because there are less Macs than Windows based PCs and the Mac operating system is inherently less susceptible to becoming infected with a virus. However, take a look at the following article related to Macs and viruses:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/4609968.stm

    Personally I have a copy of ClamXav installed on my Mac, but I don't use it very often, ClamXav is free and based on the ClamAV open source virus checker:

    http://www.clamxav.com/

    If you want to look at commercial anti-virus solutions try McAfee Virex:

    http://www.mcafee.com/us/products/mcafee/antivirus/desktop/virex.htm

    You might also find MacScan of interest which claims to be able to remove spyware, key loggers and the like:

    http://macscan.securemac.com/

    I've never used Virex or MacScan so I can't say if they are any good!

    I hope that is of some help, just remember to keep your Mac up to date using Software Update
  • Dr. Smoke Level 9 Level 9 (56,585 points)
    See my "Detecting and avoiding malware and spyware" FAQ for my recommendations as well as a list of some recent Mac OS X security threats that have emerged, including Trojans, rootkits, and spyware.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Smoke
    Author: Troubleshooting Mac® OS X

    ---
    Note: The information provided in the link(s) above is freely available. However, because I own The X Lab™, a commercial Web site to which some of these links point, the Apple Discussions Terms of Use require I include the following disclosure statement with this post:

    I may receive some form of compensation, financial or otherwise, from my recommendation or link.
  • Steve Emery Level 2 Level 2 (210 points)
    See my "De
    tecting and avoiding malware and spyware"
    FAQ for
    my recommendations as well as a list of some recent
    Mac OS X security threats that have emerged,
    including Trojans, rootkits, and spyware.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Smoke
    Author: Troubleshooting Mac® OS X

    ---
    Note: The information provided in the link(s) above
    is freely available. However, because I own The X
    Lab™, a commercial Web site to which some of these
    links point, the Apple Discussions Ter
    ms of Use
    require I include the following
    disclosure statement with this post:

    I may receive some form of compensation, financial or
    otherwise, from my recommendation or link.


    Dr. Smoke,

    In reading through the info you point to above, I have been seriously considering runing an AV program on my system. Never really thought about it before, but I guess I'm just getting more nervous as more time passes, LOL.

    Anyway, quick question. Do you really recommend Norton AV for OS X? I'm only asking as I've read so many horror stories regarding Norton and X. We run Norton on all business systems, Windows of course, at my workplace, and it runs quite well with only a few minor glitches here and there. Either way, so your experience with Norton and X has been mainly on the positive side?

    thanks for any info.

    Powermac G5 Dual 2.3Ghz   Mac OS X (10.4.4)  
  • Dr. Smoke Level 9 Level 9 (56,585 points)
    HI, Steve.

    You wrote:
    "Do you really recommend Norton AV for OS X? I'm only asking as I've read so many horror stories regarding Norton and X."
    Yes: I use NAV myself. NAV has not caused me any problems.

    The "horror stories" generally applied to Norton SystemWorks and Norton Utilities, particularly w.r.t. the disk utilities, and usually when one attempted to use back-level (obsolete) versions of their disk utilities with a recent version of Mac OS X.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Smoke
    Author: Troubleshooting Mac® OS X
  • Steve Emery Level 2 Level 2 (210 points)
    Thanks! I think I might actually give it a try.
  • James Robson Level 1 Level 1 (60 points)
    Don't do it!!!

    Well, no, go ahead if you want, but take a look here first:

    http://www.zdnet.com.au/news/security/soa/NortonAnti_Virus_makes_Mac_OS_X_less_secure/0,2000061744,39229157,00.htm

    and here:

    http://secunia.com/advisories/18131/

    This particular issue may have been solved by now, but personally, I wouldn't put any Norton products on my Mac having had so many problems with Norton products on Windows based machines.

    1.25 GHz Power Mac G4, 1.8 GHz iMac G5, 1.33 GHz iBook G4, Power Mac G4 Cube   Mac OS X (10.4.4)  
  • Dr. Smoke Level 9 Level 9 (56,585 points)
    The issue was fixed and was not the big deal everyone made it out to be. Right after it was identified Norton posted both a workaround and a virus definition to pick up compromised RAR files. The actual fix was published on 4 January and involved a change in the virus definitions.

    McAfee had similar issue around the same time. The ClamAV engine that underlies ClamXav has also had security exposures in the past.

    All software is subject to the potential that it may introduce security exposures. It is a problem due to the increasing complexity of software itself: it becomes more difficult to catch all exposures in design or testing. Apple is still distributing Mac OS X Security Updates, meaning security issues are still being found within the OS itself.

    Installing any software is a matter of trust.

    Good luck!

    Dr. Smoke
    Author: Troubleshooting Mac® OS X