11 Replies Latest reply: Sep 4, 2011 4:23 PM by brucealcock
brucealcock Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have a giant CD collection that I digitized into iTubes: its by far the bulk of my iTunes library. Will iCloud allow me to store that music in teh cloud, or only music bought and downloaded via iTunes?

  • Matthew Smith Level 5 Level 5 (6,790 points)

    If you are in the USA then iTunes Match will be available in the fall.

     

    See http://www.apple.com/icloud/features/

  • brucealcock Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So it looks like I have to pay money to receive copies of music I already own. Can I not simply store my own purchases in the cloud, so I can conveniently listen on all devices? I mean, paying for storage for a large collection I can understand, but paying to duplicate it (and probably not all of it) from another source seems, well, wrong.

  • Matthew Smith Level 5 Level 5 (6,790 points)

    You should be aiming your comments to the recording industry. This is not Apple doing this.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,215 points)

    You can use iTunes match on the songs or not.

    You are not forced to use the match version but then you will need to upload it.

    If you don't need to upload a "giant CD collection", why would you?

  • brucealcock Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Sorry, but exactly how does my comment relate to the music industry? I bought music, I ripped it for my own - legitimate - listening pleasure. Apple has a system that is pushing people - however gently and benevolently - to use it to listen to music. Very clearly, the cloud system would be a very handy way to be able to propogate a music library and maintain it across several personal digital devices. By pushing me to use the match system rather than letting me use my own music collection, they are making my more rare or out-of-circulation music unavailable for ease of use. That to me smells of homogenizing the collection and enjoyment of music, which is the danger of any over-managed approach. Of course, it also means a kick in the face to people in the music industry who aren't working within the Apple music world. So yes, absolutely it's a choice Apple has made, it is something they are doing quite deliberately. Not that I blame them, it's solid business savvy, but it's nowhere near the open and friendly convenience they present as their brand.

  • brucealcock Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I guess I had hoped the cloud would extend the same convenience of use to non-itunes-purchased music. The whole point is easy synchronization across my multiple digital devices. Why limit it? And of course i don't NEED to upload my collection, but I sure would like to be able to, simply and reasonably because I like to listen to my music.

     

    My original question was about whether or not I CAN upload my own music. Can I?

     

    The cloud isn't about need anyway, really, nor is an iPad or iPod or any of it: it's a culture of leisure, not necessity.

  • Jim VanLeeuwen Level 6 Level 6 (18,820 points)

    From the link Matthew Smith gave you earlier (and you apparently didn't read):  "Since there are more than 18 million songs in the iTunes Store, most of your music is probably already in iCloud. All you have to upload is what iTunes can’t match."

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,215 points)

    "I guess I had hoped the cloud would extend the same convenience of use to non-itunes-purchased music."

    It is just as easy. iTunes match will scan you library of non-iTunes purchases.

    This is so you do not need to upload them to the cloud.

     

    "The whole point is easy synchronization across my multiple digital devices."

    Exactly!

     

    "And of course i don't NEED to upload my collection, but I sure would like to be able to, simply and reasonably because I like to listen to my music."

    And? This is the point of iCloud and iTunes match. iTunes match means you do not have to upload much of your music because it is already available on the iCloud/iTunes servers. Why have millions of people upload the exact same song, millions of times? It

     

    "My original question was about whether or not I CAN upload my own music. Can I?"

    This question was already answered, yes.

    But you don't need to, because most of your music will already be on the iCloud/iTunes servers.

     

    "The cloud isn't about need anyway, really, nor is an iPad or iPod or any of it:"

     

    What?

  • brucealcock Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Jim, thanks for the clarification, but there's no need for bitchy comments like "and you apparently didn't read."

     

    And to be fair, I DID miss the line "All you have to upload is what iTunes can’t match."

     

    It's clear that the match system means apple will find whatever its collection has in common with mine. I also know already that a lot of my music is not in the 18 million songs in the store.

     

    I guess I can see the cost of the match system as a surcharge for not having to upload my own music, but it still feels wrong to have to pay for music I've already bought. And then to have to pay for space to store more music I've already bought.

     

    Also I'm Canadian, so who knows when the vagaries of international music rights will allow the match system to work here.

  • Chris CA Level 9 Level 9 (77,215 points)

    "but it still feels wrong to have to pay for music I've already bought. And then to have to pay for space to store more music I've already bought."

    You are not paying for music you have already bought.

    If you do not want to use iTunes match, simply use iCloud and increase the amount of storage by purchasing more space then upload all your music.

  • brucealcock Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Admittedly I was being a little polemic, and as in any statement there are base assumptions that may not be explicit. The fact is that I've bought music outside iTunes, and I'd like to sync it with all my devices using Cloud. If I want the convenience of Match I need to pay for it. That, to me, means I'm paying a second time for the same music: there are undeniably two transactions for the same piece of audio. The message to me as a consumer is "you should have bought it through iTunes to begin with." But buying outside a system, then wanting to use that system to listen to outside music inevitably carries costs and inconveniences. That is, along with the many clear conveniences iTunes and the Cloud offer, to say nothing of the pleasure of listening itself on the many great machines Apple makes.