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  • noondaywitch Level 6 Level 6 (8,130 points)

    You can usually get replacement discs (for a handling fee) by calling Applecare with the Mac's serial number.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    M3ZR wrote:

     

    im currently going through this process now but i am without my original discs and when i boot up with the options or c held down i only show one HDD please help

     

    The firmware will not allow you to c or option boot off OS X install disks that are earlier OS X version than the machine originally came with and/or grey disk from another Mac model, or if the hardware drivers are not present on the install disks.

     

    If you need replacement OS X install disks, get your serial number (from under the Apple menu> about this Mac> more information) or detailed information from other locations (box, manual etc) and contact Apple for replacement grey disks that match your machine model specifically. If you get it wrong, you may be paying again to get the correct disks.

     

     

     

    If you Mac came with OS X 10.7 "Lion"

     

    then you can't boot from earlier OS X install disks, and there isn't any Lion disks from Apple. It's a "recovery partition" (a separate space on the internal boot drive) that one holds command and r keys down (option also works) to boot into this partition. There is no Lion there, you need a Internet connection, a AppleID to download Lion again from Apple's servers.

     

    If your Internet connection isn't reliable or fast enough, you will have to purchase the $69 Lion USB thumb drive from Apple to reinstall/overwrite your operating system with a fresh version.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    Quick quide to drive formatting to use with Mac's and PC's.

     

     

    Mac's can read and write: HFS+, FAT32 (MSDOS) and exFAT

     

    Windows PC's can read and write: NTFS, FAT32 (MSDOS) and exFAT (Windows XP needs a free download)

     

    Linux can read and write to just about any format and uses EXT4 (currently) for itself.

     

     

    Either OS X or Windows can read more formats with software (usually payware) installed.

     

     

     

    The HFS+ (Mac OS X Extended) maximum file size limit is 8 exabytes, or 8 billion gigabytes  (8,000,000,000 GB)

     

     

    FAT32 (FAT or "MSDOS") has the 4GB (minus a byte) file size limit.

     

     

    You can use exFAT (with a MBR partition map) which allows for greater than 4GB sized files to share with PC's and Mac's.

     

     

    Warning: remove all data from the drive before changing it's format/partition map as it will be erased!!

     

    Also unmount and disconnect any other drive or writable media before using Disk Utility to prevent accidents.

     

     

     

    To format the drive exFAT:

     

    Use Disk Utility (in your Applications>Utilities folder) to select the "media" name on the far left, then the partition tab, select 1 partition, option: MBR, format: exFAT and click Apply.

     

    (if you don't see the partiton tab, you didn't select the "drive media" on the far left, likely you selected a partition that is slightly indented instead)

     

     

     

    To format the drive FAT (FAT32):

     

    Use Disk Utility (in your Applications>Utilities folder) to select the "media" name on the far left, then the partition tab, select 1 partition, option: MBR, format: MSDOS and click Apply.

     

    (if you don't see the partiton tab, you didn't select the "drive media" on the far left, likely you selected a partition that is slightly indented instead)

     

     

     

    To format the drive HFS+ (OSX extended):

     

    Use Disk Utility (in your Applications>Utilities folder) to select the "media" name on the far left, then the partition tab, select 1 partition, option: GUID, format: OS X Extended (journaled) and click Apply.

     

    (if you don't see the partiton tab, you didn't select the "drive media" on the far left, likely you selected a partition that is slightly indented instead)

     

     

     

    For hard drives IT's ADVISED: to erase with security option Zero All Data to give the drive a chance to map off bad sectors, especially if your have a problem formatting the drive.

     

    If your creating more partitions on a existing drive, it's wise to Erase Free Space with Zero option to map off any new bad sectors that appear before formatting another partition.

     

    For some reason Disk Utility gets hung up on new bad sectors while formatting, existing ones mapped off are just fine. Thus the "Zero erase" will map them off before formatting occurs.

     

     

     

    If your 10.6 Mac hasn't been updated to 10.6.5 -10.6.8, you need to do this under the Apple menu> Software Update to use exFAT. 10.7+ is fine.

     

     

    If you have a Windows XP machine, you can download a free exFAT from Microsoft, Windows Vista and 7 already have exFAT installed.

     

    https://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=19364

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    Quick Whole Drive Format Guide

     

    • Copy off all your data off the target drive that is going to be formatted drive to another drive and disconnect other drives if possible not to make a mistake.
    • Open Disk Utility in the Applications>Utilities folder
    • Select your target drive drive on the far left,  should have the drive makers name, a ID perhaps plus the word "media" (slightly intented names are "partitions" on that media)
    • Click the Partition Tab, click the big box and click 1 Partition
    • If you want a Mac only drive (can be booted from with a OSX) > Option: GUID >format OS X Extended (Journaled)
    • If you want a Mac/PC drive (for over 4GB sized files) > Option: MBR > format exFAT
    • If you want a Mac/PC drive (for the most compatibility with other devices, w/Win XP, but only under 4GB sized files) > Option: MBR > format MSDOS (aka FAT/FAT32)
    • Give it a name and click Apply.

     

    Mac's can't format or write to NTFS or EXT drives without extra software.

     

    You can also search Microsoft for a free exFAT download if you have Win XP.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    About secure connections HTTPS

     

     

    HTTP is unencrypted, sent in the open type transmissions between your computer and the website your visiting, it's subjective to being monitored or intercepted by various means, WIFI, LAN, tap, ISP etc.

     

    HTTPS means a secure connection, that the transmision is encrypted back and forth from the website to your computer, so no one in between can watch you.

     

    This is a important necessary function for using bank sites and other sensitive sites where you can't have snoopers in between watching your traffic and intercepting your passwords or business.

     

    Always look for the HTTPS in the URL when on sensitive sites or other sites to know if your buisness and actions can be monitored by outside sources and don't enter sensitive information unless you see that HTTPS sign.

     

     

    You can request a HTTPS session from most websites and a lot deliver such a connection if requested, but if all elements on the website can't be encrypted, like some content is from another site and can't be encrypted, then it defaults to HTTP which isn't encrypted.

     

    If you want to use HTTPS as much as possible, you need a automatic feature to do it for you.

     

    Install Firefox (check your plug-ins while your at it) and the HTTPS Everywhere add-on.

     

     

    https://www.mozilla.org/en-US/plugincheck/

     

    https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere

     

     

     

    What this will do is request a HTTPS secure connection from every web site you visit automatically, if it can't be HTTPS, then it defaults to HTTP automatically.

     

    This way your traffic is as secure as possible from people "sniffing" your Wifi traffic, or local area networks like in hotels, coffee shops and whatnot that may be recording all your unencrypted traffic to gleam valuable passwords and information to impersonate you to your bank to gain a new password or access your accounts in other places.

     

    Of course HTTPS is no match for the government which can tap the Internet itself and has all the keys, but it does lock out nearly all the criminals, snoops, marketers and other types who are selling your information and Internet traffic.

     

    These Apple Support forums will provide a HTTPS secure connection.

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3358920?start=15&tstart=0

     

    So will Wikipedia, YouTube, Goolge and many many others, it's usually sites with advertising, web bugs and trackers that can't because, they are watching you.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    I got a new Mac with Lion, where's the OS X boot disk?


    My machine came with OS X Lion 10.7,


    I want to have bootable Lion DVD like Snow Leopard 10.6.

     

     

    If your machine came with Lion, you cannot make a bootable DVD.

     

    You cannot purchase Lion in the AppStore to make one via the tricks that 10.6 users can from the installer.

     

    You can't even use a Lion boot DVD made on another Mac that can, because the Lion AppStore download is tailored to each machine with specific hardware drivers.

     

    What is needed is a third party program that can take a current Lion install with it's hardware drivers and make a clean bootable DVD of it, no such program exists that I know if, although such a thing does exist on Linux for Linux.

     

     

    About your Lion recovery options:

     

    OS X Lion has two partitions on the drive standard (actually three with hidden EFI and four if you have Bootcamp), one is the Lion OS X Partition and the other is the Lion Recovery Partition. (hold command and r keys down while booting to access)

     

    The Lion Recovery Partition is the only way to download a fresh copy of Lion from Apple's servers, the other method is to buy a $69 Lion USB Thumb drive.

     

    If you think this is a not a bright idea that Apple doesn't provide a free, included copy of OS X Lion with each new machine on a inexpensive thumb drive, please vent your opinions here, perhaps they will realize their mistake as not everyone has a fast, strong and stable Internet connection or restricted by bandwidth caps by their Internet Service Provider, and it's very unfair to target these people for another $69 for something they have no control over.

     

    https://www.apple.com/feedback/macosx.html

     

     

    You CAN make a Carbon Copy Cloner of your Lion OS X Partition to a blank external Disk Utility formatted, 1 Partition, Option: GUID Partition Table  Format: OS X Extended (Journaled) powered drive which is "hold the option key bootable", but doesn't contain the Lion Recovery Partition and isn't required to boot the computer.

     

    You CAN make a Lion Recovery USB key using the Lion Recovery Disk Assistant from Apple, which copies your present Lion Recovery Partition to the USB (1GB+) formatted the same GUID and OS X Extended (J) as a external drive clone above. This is essential to have if you intend to replace your hard drive to place the Lion Recovery Partition back on, to be able to download a fresh Lion copy.

     

    You CAN hold option key and boot from the Lion Recovery USB which will allow you to install the Lion Recovery Partition, which will then allow you to either install Lion into the Lion OS X Partition or "reverse clone" Lion from a "hold option key booted" external drive clone.

     

    You cannot clone TimeMachine, Filevaulted or Bootcamp Windows partitions (well you can with Bootcamp, it's not going to boot if you do)

     

    Refer to all the previous posts and especially the Lion Recovery pictures in this thread how to accomplish the above tasks.

     

    Windows computers have been shipping with a recovery partition for quite some time now, except with that it actually contains Windows and all the hardware drivers and included software from the PC vendor, unlike what Apple does which makes you log in with your AppleID to download a fresh copy of OS X Lion then visit the AppStore to download (and fight) for your free iLife suite. Surely with Lion only taking 4.7 GB on a standard DVD there is plenty of enough room on these new huge storage drives to contain a full verison of Lion in the Lion Recovery Partition on new Mac's.

  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)

    ds store wrote:

    . . .

    From here on out everything TimeMachine, including restoring from a TM drive, I point you to our resident expert Pondini and his web page.

     

    http://web.me.com/pondini/Time_Machine/Home.html

    Hi, ds,

     

    Just for future reference, I've moved my site to http://pondini.org, since Apple is dropping web hosting in June.

     

    Both sites are active now;  after a few days, I'll put redirect notices on the old one, then leave it there until it goes "poof."

     

    Thanks,

    Jim

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    Correction:

     

    One can make a "hold the option or c key bootable" Lion boot DVD with a factory Lion Mac following these combined directions.

     

    However it's been mentioned that OS X boot disks won't boot off some external third party optical drives.

     

    One will need a blank external GUID OS X Extended (aka: "JHFS+") formatted drive and standard 4.7GB DVD(s)

     

     

    Step 1:

    It's very easy to use the Mac App Store's smarts to our own advantage and gain access to a copy of that hardware specific OS build. Here's what to do:

     

    1. Boot the hardware you need an image for from the Recovery HD by holding Command-r at power on time.
    2. Plug in a JHFS+ formatted external disk.
    3. Select the Re-install OS X Lion option and target the external disk.
    4. Once the Installer finishes downloading, simply shutdown and unplug the disk.

     

    Now when you mount that external disk you will find a directory named Mac OS X Install Data on the root. Inside of this folder is the elusive, hardware-specific, InstallerESD.dmg image that you can feed to SIU or any other imaging tool of choice. Having this installer will now allow you to build out re-deployment images for all of your hardware until rollup installers are available.

     

    http://www.afp548.com/article.php?story=getting-lion-installers

     

     

    Step 2:

    Inside the Contents folder that appears you will find a SharedSupport folder and inside the SharedSupport folder you will find the “InstallESD.dmg.” This is the Lion boot disc image we have all been waiting for.

     

    1. Copy “InstallESD.dmg” to another folder like the Desktop.
    2. Launch Disk Utility and click the burn button.
    3. Select the copied “InstallESD.dmg” as the image to burn, insert a standard sized 4.7 GB DVD, and wait for your new Lion Boot Disc to come out toasty hot.

     

    http://eggfreckles.net/notes/burning-a-lion-boot-disc/

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    Pondini wrote:

     

    Just for future reference, I've moved my site to http://pondini.org, since Apple is dropping web hosting in June.

     

    Both sites are active now;  after a few days, I'll put redirect notices on the old one, then leave it there until it goes "poof."


     

    Ok,

     

    Time to let this thread die anyway as I can't edit anything.

     

    I tried something, I learned something.

  • jorgefromupland Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you for all the information. I have found this discussion to answer all my inquiries on restoring my new MacBook pro back to original factory settings.

     

     

    I’m new to this and I’m going to  do a fresh install of lion10.7.2. Under the disk utility I see a 500.11 GB ST9500325AGS drive and below that I see in indentions a Macintosh HD, which one would be the one I erase and reformat?

     

     

     

    Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • noondaywitch Level 6 Level 6 (8,130 points)

    The top level drive with the size & maker's part no. is the physical drive; Macintosh HD is the volume created when the physical drive was partitioned.

    Erase and re-install to Macintosh HD.

  • jorgefromupland Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Here goes another question, by restoring my mac back to factory setting with the Lion thumb drive that i ordered from Apple, would I be destroying the ability to restore my MacBook Pro from the Internet recovery option at a future date?

     

    Thank you in advance… 

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,320 points)

    jorgefromupland wrote:

     

    I’m new to this and I’m going to  do a fresh install of lion10.7.2. Under the disk utility I see a 500.11 GB ST9500325AGS drive and below that I see in indentions a Macintosh HD, which one would be the one I erase and reformat?

     

     

    A "fresh install" means your going to wipe the entire drive of all data, the operating system, the programs and your files.

     

    The only thing that is going to be on the drive is the operating system and Apple bundled programs installed from the Lion USB thumb drive.

     

    If this is not what you want to do, then stop, shutdown and let a qualified professional or knowledgeable friend to assist you.

     

     

     

     

    Select the 500.11 GB drive, click Erase tab, click Security Options, select Zero All Data, ok, click Erase, wait a hour or so until it's finished.

     

    (This is going to check the entire drive for any defective or failing bad sectors before you place anything on the drive.)

     

    Then select the Partition Tab, select 1 Partition, click Option: select GUID, Format: OS X Extended (Journaled), name it MacIntosh HD and click Apply.

     

    This is a fast step and makes sure the drive partition map is exactly formatted as intended for the OS X version your installing.

     

     

    Quit Disk Utility and click the Lion Installer, install Lion onto the 500.11 GB drive.

     

    The Lion installer will install the Lion Recovery Partition automatically, and No it will not affect you being able to, in the future, install Lion via the Lion Internet Recovery Partition.

     

    Your AppleID determines if your allowed to download Lion from Apple's Servers using the Lion Recovery Partition.

  • roystonfrombrighton Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    HI,

     

    Very very useful for a beginner like me just preparing to make backups and clones on my recently purchased MacBook Air.

     

    Do you think that a directly USB connected, externally powered, external drive, such as the WD for Mac, or the LaCie Porsche Design would be suitable for this duty? Partitioned for Time Machine and a Clone?

     

    There is also Seagate Wireless Home drive which connects to the Airport Extreme and works wirelessly. Do you think that this is an appropriate drive to use with Time Machine wirelessly, while a separate external drive could be used directly connected to hold the Clone?

     

    Which system do you think would be preferable?

     

    Thank you,

     

    roystonfrombrighton.

  • Pondini Level 8 Level 8 (38,715 points)

    roystonfrombrighton wrote:

    . . .

    Do you think that a directly USB connected, externally powered, external drive, such as the WD for Mac, or the LaCie Porsche Design would be suitable for this duty?

    Yes (although some say WD externals don't work so well with Macs).  Generally, any good external should be fine.  Don't use any of the software that comes with it, and reformat it yourself. 

     

    Partitioned for Time Machine and a Clone?

    That's certainly doable (as long as there's enough space), but for best protection, don't put both your backups on the same physical drive -- when (not if) it fails, you risk losing both.

     

    There is also Seagate Wireless Home drive which connects to the Airport Extreme and works wirelessly. Do you think that this is an appropriate drive to use with Time Machine wirelessly

    That might work, but with any 3rd-party NAS (Network Attached Storage) device, there are some potential downsides.  See the pink box in #2 of Time Machine - Frequently Asked Questions.

     

    Do you already have an Airport Extreme, or other wireless router?  If not, you might consider a Time Capsule -- it's a combination of a wireless router with a built-in hard drive, designed specifically as a wireless backup destination for Time Machine:  http://store.apple.com/us/product/MD032LL/A/Time-Capsule-2TB?fnode=MTY1NDA0Mg