Previous 1 68 69 70 71 72 Next 1,130 Replies Latest reply: Aug 22, 2012 10:31 AM by MlchaelLAX Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • Woodwyn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Top_Steve, I need a way to get Microsoft Word 2004 documents from my Snow Leopard Mac into a "cloud", so I can access them from any device I own, including someone else's computer.

  • TopSteve Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)

    I would do one of:

     

    Run a server at home; (FTP) and iver use port forwarding on my router to help with security (port n to port 21) or open port 21 in the firewall making shoure the computer you run this on is secure and password are as secure as posabal.

     

    or

     

    Install something like "Quixplorer" http://quixplorer.sourceforge.net/ onto a website you run  (I use this and FTP)

     

    or

     

    Use DropBox

  • TopSteve Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)

    Forgot to say you can run a server at home even if your on dynamic IP using a service like dyndns  I do.  LINUX is good for this but also OSX server is good to but I have some gripes with OSx Server that I do not with LINUX.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    Woodwyn wrote:

     

    I believe this was the statement in which you implied there were issues with the used mid-2009 MacBook I bought on eBay:

     

    MichaelLAX wrote: "Until the day that you turned it on and it was a complete wipe-out, which given its pedigree, would happen sooner than later.  A late-2006 MacBook had a good life through mid-2012. "

    Sorry that you misunderstood, that when I was talking about a late-2006 MacBook, I was talking about a late-2006 MacBook!

     

    I have yet to have a catastrophic failure of any Apple product, nor do I know anyone who has. the most common problem with Macs is bad hard drives. Since I routinely upgrade mine every two years as storage increases and prices drop, to gain extra room, I have never had a problem with mine. The only hard drive I ever had replaced was in my Time Capsule and Apple replaced it for free out of warranty.

    Not sure what is catastrophic to you, but I purchased a slew of iMac G5's that serially suffered from bad capacitor problems for many years.  In Apple defense, I will say that they stood behind them by extending their repair program and even fixed the last three for free well after the extended program had ended.  The last of them (not a bad capacitor model) required a power supply repair in 2010 and I retired it when the hard drive died in 2011, in lieu of my replacement, the mid-2011 Mac Mini (whose Lion OS required me to learn much about how to install Snow Leopard (and Rosetta) into Parallels 7).

     

    I got your "fungibility" right here - I bought a cherry pie at a church bake sale. Later that year the church bought a new iMac. Yup ... My money went to Apple ... can't argue with that logic.

    Look, if it helps you sleep better at night thinking that your purchase of a used 2009 MacBook had no economic value to Apple, go on believing that!  It's like my parents' friend, who's husband was against her purchasing a Mercedes because of their involvement in World War II, so she purchased a used Mercedes...

     

    I did keep the Core Duo MacBook. Can't keep MobileMe, so not sure what your point is, since this is all about Apple sun-setting MobileMe and not replacing it with a comparable service on Every Mac that could support MobileMe.

     

    "Retirement Accounts"? That's a strawman argument and I'll none of it ...

     

    No kids. I want the wireless sync that was promised to me on the equipment I purchased to get it.

    For how long does Apple have to support a service like MobileMe into the future?  Forever? I think they stopped charging you for it some time ago; check your credit card records...

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    Woodwyn wrote:

     

    ...Apple tried this in the 90s selling Macs with lifetime customer support. Steve Jobs decided he didn't want to honor that agreement anymore, and got slapped with a class action lawsuit forcing Apple to honor its commitment...

    I thought I was talking to someone rational, but if you're going to make these kinds of false statements, then there is no point in rebutting them!

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    Woodwyn wrote:

     

    Top_Steve, I need a way to get Microsoft Word 2004 documents from my Snow Leopard Mac into a "cloud", so I can access them from any device I own, including someone else's computer.

    I'd like to help you, but I've made a lifetime commitment not to tell you to get Dropbox!

  • Woodwyn Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    MichaelLAX, what part of my statement about the class action lawsuit over Apple failing to honor its lifetime commitment to customer support in the 90s is false ... that Steve Jobs personally ordered it? Agreed that may be over the top, but it is a bit coincidnetal that he was cleaning house at Apple in 1997, and the change in Apple Care support just so happened to correspond with his taking control of the helm.

     

    http://www.info.apple.com/usen/legacy/legacyfaq.html

     

    http://scholar.google.com/scholar_case?case=12455738165873813328

     

    As for Dropbox, I did not realize there was an app. Since iDisk will not be discontinued until the end of the month with no replacement solution by Apple, I have not had to use a third party solution until now. Thanks for not telling me about it.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    Woodwyn wrote:

     

    Rg_michael, I feel your pain. My original iPhone still works perfectly well, just as it was sold to me. Like MichaelLAX' irrelevant stab at  humor, one day AT&T will no longer support the device, just as no one supports that brick-phone. But it will be a long time before they drop the 2G standard, which is still widely used in many remote and rural areas. Heck it still crops up ocassionally in Los Angeles, where AT&T still has insufficient 3G coverage, and let's not even discuss 4G. Now, I haven't used the original iPhone for several years because I needed the speed and features  the iPhone 4 offered, and in that regard I voluntarily upgraded the phone. However, one of the selling points for the original iPhone was MobileMe, which works today on that iPhone, exactly the way it did when I bought it (actually better). Perhaps there was some fine print somewhere that said "MobileMe will only be supported for 5 years, or until Apple decides not to". Using that as the benchmark, that meayottabyte should expect that the iPhone 3GS they are still selling today will no longer support iCloud by 2014, despite the fact the phone likely will be just as useful then as it is today, and was three years ago!! Obviously the services provided by iCloud are not so unique that they could not be implemented on the original iPhone, which supports MobileMe without a hitch. Apple simply chose not to. This is not an issue of a device being left behind because the infrastructure that supports the device was replaced. It is a calculated decision not to develop software which the device could easily support to drive sales of new products, and that's a big difference. No one is asking for anything more than the service sold with the device. Apple tried this in the 90s selling Macs with lifetime customer support. Steve Jobs decided he didn't want to honor that agreement anymore, and got slapped with a class action lawsuit forcing Apple to honor its commitment. Now I'm sure Apple sufficiently protected itself this time with the iPhone and MobileMe, but the fact is, the phone still works perfectly, yet the service used to sell the phone is no longer offered, even though Apple has offered a replacement for newer phones which is otherwise perfectly compatible (considering that they ran MobileMe flawlessly too), and that's kind of sneaky.

     

    Feel free to use the RETURN/ENTER key once in a while; rumor has it that Apple will be discontinuing its inclusion in future keyboards WITHOUT NOTICE!

     

    MichaelLAX, what part of my statement about the class action lawsuit over Apple failing to honor its lifetime commitment to customer support in the 90s is false ... that Steve Jobs personally ordered it? Agreed that may be over the top, but it is a bit coincidnetal that he was cleaning house at Apple in 1997, and the change in Apple Care support just so happened to correspond with his taking control of the helm.

    Apple never sold Macs with "lifetime customer support."  There were certain early 90's models that were sold with free telephone support and class action litigation was settled with regard to those models after Apple later attempted to charge for telephone support. 

     

    I have no doubt that it was Steve Jobs who ended that practice, since he considered those models, in his words "sh*tty!"  Ironically it was Jobs who convinced John Sculley that Apple should have a one year warranty, in lieu of the industry standard in the consumer electronics industry of that time of 90 days...

  • Andy Thornton UK Level 1 Level 1 (20 points)

    Getting back on topic....

    I suspect iCloud could be integrated for all Mac/Intel systems but the decision is commercial.

    I'm reminded of a similar Apple policy when the first iPhone was replaced by the iPhone 3G.  iOS upgrades then provided video recording but it didn't support the original iPhone.  The claim from Apple was hardware limitations but those of us who investigated further discovered a perfectly useable video recording app for jail broken 1st gens. 

     

    In the same manner, the lack of iCloud integration for earlier OS X versions is unlikely to be because it's not possible, more likely a commercial decision to force upgrades. 

     

    Apple have reached a point now where they are comfortable exploring the threshold of customers' tolerance, and if there is some collateral damage in the process then they can absorb that.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    Andy Thornton UK wrote:

     

    Getting back on topic....

    Have you read the thread's name?  This whole thread is a JOKE!

  • TopSteve Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)

    MlchaelLAX wrote:

     

    Andy Thornton UK wrote:

     

    Getting back on topic....

    Have you read the thread's name?  This whole thread is a JOKE!

    MichaelLAX it's NO JOKE!!!

  • TopSteve Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)

    yes, Yes, YEs, YES!!!

    Andy Thornton UK wrote:

     

    Getting back on topic....

    I suspect iCloud could be integrated for all Mac/Intel systems but the decision is commercial.

    I'm reminded of a similar Apple policy when the first iPhone was replaced by the iPhone 3G.  iOS upgrades then provided video recording but it didn't support the original iPhone.  The claim from Apple was hardware limitations but those of us who investigated further discovered a perfectly useable video recording app for jail broken 1st gens. 

     

    In the same manner, the lack of iCloud integration for earlier OS X versions is unlikely to be because it's not possible, more likely a commercial decision to force upgrades. 

     

    Apple have reached a point now where they are comfortable exploring the threshold of customers' tolerance, and if there is some collateral damage in the process then they can absorb that.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    72 pages: there is nothing serious left to say on the subject -- look at your own posts!?!

  • TopSteve Level 1 Level 1 (65 points)

    MlchaelLAX wrote:

     

    72 pages: there is nothing serious left to say on the subject -- look at your own posts!?!

    Why? you think I don't know what I write?

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    TopSteve wrote:

     

    Why? you think I don't know what I write?

    Read the last three and you tell me!

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