10 Replies Latest reply: Nov 21, 2011 9:44 PM by WoodPlane
WoodPlane Level 2 Level 2

Any argument against selling software in general, and in the App Store in particular? I've been writing software for my own use and some of it seems like it would be useful to others. I would imagine that one should establish a sole proprietorship or an S-class corporation. Anything else to consider?

  • sptrakesh Level 4 Level 4

    You do not need to be a business to sell on the app store, although you may find it easier at tax time if you did.  I cannot think of any reason why you would not want to try and sell your software (whether people buy or not is another issue altogether).

  • K T Level 7 Level 7
    expertise.publishing
    Publishing

    OS X Development recently received news that beginning in March 20012, all apps will be required to use sandboxing - it would appear that the days of casually distributing software are going away.

     

    See this link for details on joining the Individual Developer Program: iOS Developer Program - note you can also sign up as a company as well thru that program, in which case I believe a LLC approach is most common/recommended.

     

    Good luck in any case.

  • etresoft Level 7 Level 7

    K T wrote:

     

    OS X Development recently received news that beginning in March 20012, all apps will be required to use sandboxing - it would appear that the days of casually distributing software are going away.

    Apple will require all Mac App Store applications to be sandboxed. I know of no plans to restrict any casual distribution of software. That is possible even on iOS. One day developers could be required to pay just to digitally sign an application, and they may howl about that, but that is just speculation on my part, would be years away, and is, ultimately, nothing new in the industry anyway.

     

    If you want to distribute your software so that it might be useful to others, consider releasing it as a library. You could attempt to sell the library or distribute it as open source. Only applications can be sold in the App Store anyway. If you want to sell the library, you have to do it on your own. If you want to release it as open source, make sure to use a license that will allow people to sell their applications built with your library in the App Store.

  • WoodPlane Level 2 Level 2

    While other readers may benefit from the discussion, I am only talking about selling applications, not libraries.

     

    A friend of mine has written some programs, but has sworn never to sell anything because of the liability involved. He says it's just not worth the risk of lawsuit, even if such a suit were unfounded.

  • HyperNova Software Level 6 Level 6

    What liablity?

  • WoodPlane Level 2 Level 2

    If your application deletes anything, or the user claims it deleted something, wrecked their hard drive, made them late for work or mean to their wife. Basically, anyone can suit anyone for anything in this country. Whether or not they have a case, you have to go through the time & expense to get rid of it.

  • HyperNova Software Level 6 Level 6

    Not if they agree to the EULA before using the app.

     

    That's a legal contract that indemnifies the developer from ANY damages caused by using the app.

     

    Please provide a link to a lawsuit where this was not upheld in a court of law.

  • WoodPlane Level 2 Level 2

    End User Licening Agreement?

     

    Might you have a link to a standard form of a EULA?

  • HyperNova Software Level 6 Level 6

    No.  But I'm sure Googling will find one.

     

    My take on this is to sell my app as an LLC so my personal possessions are protected and also to engage the services of an attorney to draw up any legal documents such as the EULA.

     

    At any rate, the advantages of creating, offering and hopefully selling a useful and fun app overrides any potential lawsuits, which you seem to be worried about.

     

    Life is short.  Take the necessary precautions and then go full speed ahead.

  • WoodPlane Level 2 Level 2

    Does the Apple Developer Program offer any information about the business end of things?

     

    My S-corp friend says he buys error and omission insurance. I think that would be a bit much for selling apps.