Previous 1 2 Next 29 Replies Latest reply: Nov 30, 2013 1:47 PM by Meg St._Clair Go to original post
  • Dah•veed Level 7 Level 7 (32,500 points)

    You can choose the default photo app for your device in the Image Capture app, bottom left corner. Highlight the device in the list and then make your selection from the pulldown menu below. If the options are not visible, click the tiny icon in the corner.

     

    Screen Shot 2012-01-21 at 3.32.19 PM.PNG

  • Rysz Level 5 Level 5 (6,585 points)

    The question was to Dave Hutch. I don't see what bypassing iPhoto and importing directly to Photoshop has to do with retaining original photo resolution.

  • DavidSLynch Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    When I figured out what I was doing - photos taken with the back camera came into iPhoto and then to Photoshop in high resolution, so ethe problem is solved.

     

    I looked in both iTunes and iPhoto and did not see the Image Capture option when the device was selected. Earlier version? Or is it a Lion thing? (I'm not upgrading to 10.7 until a major cleanup has been done! - It'll be even longer if Apple relases a Cloud-compatible version of 10.6.)

  • Rysz Level 5 Level 5 (6,585 points)

    Image Capture is not part of iTunes or iPhoto and iTunes has nothing to do with transferring of photos. Image Capture is a separate application that you can find in the Utilities folder inside Applications.

     

    Considering your limited knowledge about the OS in general, perhaps you should withhold an opinion about Lion until you know more about it.

  • Dah•veed Level 7 Level 7 (32,500 points)

    At this point you are just being mean needlessly.

  • DavidSLynch Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I know what Image Capture is. I didn't know if there was an iOS version of that program and perhaps that was what Dah•veed was talking about.

     

    Rysz, I wish there was parameter RAM for attitudes. If there was, I would advise you to zap yours.

  • DavidSLynch Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    PS - Dah•veed, now I see what you're talking about. Thanks!

  • Dave Hutch Level 4 Level 4 (1,470 points)

    DavidSLynch wrote:

     

    @Dave Hutch: BTW, how do you bypass iPhoto? Do you have a special program that allows you to mount your iPhone as a volume in the Finder?

    Nothing special.

    I use Photoshop CS5 rather than iPhoto so I just made sure that when I connected the iPhone, it didn't open iPhoto.

     

    I just use Image Capture (in Applications Folder) instead. Connect the iPhone, open Image Capture and it lists all photos and videos for you to drag and drop into whatever folders you fancy

     

    I've always viewed iPhoto as an app for the consumer rather than a professional image application and I do a lot of photography with a DSLR also, so I just stick to Photoshop.

  • catlopez Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I know apple says our camera is an 8megpixel camera. BUT why is it every photo i take is less than 3megs?  How do I set my settings to the highest quality.  I am not referring to video clips, only still photos.

  • Rysz Level 5 Level 5 (6,585 points)

    One has nothing to do with the other. Eight megapixels refers to the camera sensor and how many pixels (dots) it can read. Three megs refers to the file size and how many bytes it takes to store it. Also, photos are stored in JPEG file format. JPEG is a method to compress the file size without significant quality loss.

  • Donnie631 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    the issue that everyone is missing is the DPI. when you take an 8megapixel photo with your iphone and upload it, the resolution is only 72dpi. that is why the quality is too low for print. you need at minimum, 150-200 dpi. preferably 300. Smart phones have a resolution of 72dpi because they are meant for social media and the web, which displays on your monitor at 72dpi which is why they look awesome on screen but you cannot print them.

  • Rysz Level 5 Level 5 (6,585 points)

    Nonsense. DPI is a printing resolution. Has absolutely nothing to do with picture/camera resolution.

     

    Please check your "facts" before posting.

  • Donnie631 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    And if you actually read the thread you would see that people can't print images because of poor resolution. People chiming in about camera resolution weren't answering his issue of why he couldn't use the photos to print. Hence the DPI issue. Understand what you are talking about before foolishly posting nonsense

  • Donnie F. Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Why do none of these questions or replies refer to the size of the photo in MB or KB?  My iphone 4s describes then in terms of srorage capacity whenever I try to email them, never in pixels, and offers choices to shrink or to send at original size.

     

    Thanks,

  • Meg St._Clair Level 8 Level 8 (45,570 points)

    Donnie F. wrote:

     

    Why do none of these questions or replies refer to the size of the photo in MB or KB?  My iphone 4s describes then in terms of srorage capacity whenever I try to email them, never in pixels, and offers choices to shrink or to send at original size.

    Size in megabytes is not directly relevant to printing photos, the subject of this thread. It is, however, important when emailing a file. Some email providers restrict sizes of attachments. Some people have metered data plans. If you expect that the picture is just going to be viewed on a phone, small is probably fine. If the person on the other end is perhaps going to print it and you're on WiFi, you may want to use large.

     

    Best of luck.

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