Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next 104 Replies Latest reply: Apr 3, 2012 9:27 AM by karenjk Go to original post
  • leappod Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    From my meagre understanding of computers, it looks like I have to buy Pages for iOS to get the documents to the cloud.  Having Pages on my Mac doesn't work?

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (27,380 points)

    Correct. As far as I know, once you've created a document using iWork of iOS on a iDevice and get it into iCloud, you can then see it with your Mac and actually make changes; but the initial work has to be done on an iDevice, which means you need to buy the iOS version of iWork.

     

    http://www.apple.com/support/icloud/documents/

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (43,335 points)

    Carolyn Samit wrote:

     

    What is the point of iCloud?

     

    If you update a document on your Mac, it would automatically update the same document on an iOS device and vice versa. Same with Calendars, Mail, Photos, Contacts, and Bookmarks.

    Don't suppose you know when that is supposed to start working?

  • Ziatron Level 4 Level 4 (3,745 points)
    Another function of iCloud that useful is it backup ALL your idevice app data and settings so you don't have to worry about to play again those games levels. So it's useful.

     

    I would recommend that you not store any personal, sensitive, or financial information in the cloud. The government doesn't do it for security reasons, and neither should you.

  • karenjk Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    You're right!

  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)

    leappod wrote:

     

    From my meagre understanding of computers, it looks like I have to buy Pages for iOS to get the documents to the cloud.  Having Pages on my Mac doesn't work?

     

    I believe you are correct.  iCloud is a sales platform for Apple, and it requires you to have Lion and/or iOS 5.  Cha-ching!

  • Julian Wright Level 7 Level 7 (34,860 points)

    Every product or service offered by every company on the planet is a 'sales platform'. When a company gives something away for free, they do so in the hope or expectation that you will buy other products, or upgrades to the free product.

     

    That's how commercial businesses work, encourage further sales, and make a profit to fund new product development - nothing new or unique to Apple there.

  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)

    Julian Wright wrote:

     

    Every product or service offered by every company on the planet is a 'sales platform'. When a company gives something away for free, they do so in the hope or expectation that you will buy other products, or upgrades to the free product.

     

    That's how commercial businesses work, encourage further sales, and make a profit to fund new product development - nothing new or unique to Apple there.

     

    That's a rather simplistic explanation.  Apple is moving away from being a maker of computers and tools useful for professionals toward becoming a maker of expensive multimedia toys for consumers.  It's both disappointing and frustrating for those of us who made a decision not so long ago to replace PCs with Macs in our own businesses. 

     

    I don't need an iClound for my iTunes files, I need a MobileMe with an iDisk and remote access to my Time Capsules for my work files (and an OS X server that's worthy of professional use).  It's a radical change for Apple and not particularly useful for those of us who are more interested in productivity than playtime.

  • Julian Wright Level 7 Level 7 (34,860 points)

    Considering both MobileMe and iCloud are aimed at consumers rather than businesses (which is obvious by both services complete lack of business features and service level guarantees a business needs) the introduction of iCloud makes no difference to business use of Macs.

     

    No serious business would use a consumer-level (free) service and expect it to offer business like levels of service.

     

    Apple's move into consumer electronics is nothing new either - the first iPod is over a decade old now, and their computers are more capable and popular than ever. The more Macs that get sold the more software gets written for them. Look at how many professional software packages have returned to the Mac recently or been released for the first time.

  • TZ Level 1 Level 1 (120 points)

    Julian Wright wrote:

     

    Considering both MobileMe and iCloud are aimed at consumers rather than businesses (which is obvious by both services complete lack of business features and service level guarantees a business needs) the introduction of iCloud makes no difference to business use of Macs.

     

    No serious business would use a consumer-level (free) service and expect it to offer business like levels of service.

     

    Apple's move into consumer electronics is nothing new either - the first iPod is over a decade old now, and their computers are more capable and popular than ever. The more Macs that get sold the more software gets written for them. Look at how many professional software packages have returned to the Mac recently or been released for the first time.

    I know lots of businesses that use MobileMe for business. It's used as Microsoft Exchange would be used in the PC world and it works real well.

     

    iCloud is missing most of the features that makes MobileMe useful to businesses so I guess we are going to see a shift back to Microsoft solutions in professional use, realy pity.

  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)

    Julian Wright wrote:

     

    No serious business would use a consumer-level (free) service and expect it to offer business like levels of service.

     

    MobileMe was not free and some of its features have been very useful for my work.  Now there is no choice as Apple will be dumping it completely in a few months.  For my business needs, MobileMe worked and iCloud contains none of the useful MobileMe features I used almost daily.  There is no option now for MobileMe users, either paid or free.  Apple has abandoned its MobileMe customers in favor of the iCloud sales platform for selling its iTunes media files.

  • Julian Wright Level 7 Level 7 (34,860 points)

    I never said MobileMe was free - iCloud is free. MobileMe was a consumer-level service though, despite not being free. Although some people used MobileMe for business purposes, that doesn't mean that's what it was intended for.

     

    It even say's as much in the MobileMe Terms of Service:

     

    "You further acknowledge and agree that the Service is designed and intended for personal use on an individual basis"

     

    Nor does MobileMe come with any guarantees of service, that a business user would expect and need:

     

    "Neither Apple nor any of its content providers guarantees the availability, accuracy, completeness, reliability, or timeliness of location data or any other data displayed by the Service."

     

    And the Terms of Use also contained:

     

    "Apple reserves the right to modify or stop the Service (or any part thereof), either temporarily or permanently, at any time or from time to time, with or without prior notice to you."

     

    Services aimed at businesses come with Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and guaranteed uptime levels. If a business is relying on a service to 'run' their business they need these guarantees. It doesn't look very professional if you're trying to use MobileMe for business during one if it's fairly frequent outages.

     

    MobileMe (like iCloud) doesn't even let you use your own domain for email. I don't think any professional business would want to use an @me.com email address for their business. It just doesn't give off a professional image - like using a yahoo or hotmail email address.

  • Winston Churchill Level 10 Level 10 (87,395 points)

    I am one of those who used mobile me for my business, I can't say it ever let me down although in the very early days of iDisk it did require Apple tech to reset it as it had become full of corrupt data. I used my own domain for email, I did host my web pages on mobile me but had my customers redirected to it from my domain name.

     

    I rarely read terms of use, but remember being advised it wasn't a business service another way (forget how) quite clearly when I began using it. I can't understand the big hoohar over it changing to iCloud, syncing remains and is better, I now use dropbox for storage and have yet to move my website, no big deal a five minute decision on a Monday morning, it took 10 minutes to migrate to iCloud, another 10 to sign up for dropbox (although I did have to do it on a Friday so it was ready for Monday morning) and when I've decided on where I will have my website I don't envisage it taking too much of my time, although it may take a while to actually publish it for the first time.

     

    As for inconvenience, it was no more inconvenient than someone turning up 20 minutes late for a meeting, indeed it was less, the 30 minutes I spent reorganising was done when I wanted in my own time, the late meeting can throw the whole day out.

  • Robert Towers Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    I also do not see the point of iCloud.

    I have attempted to download a number of iWork 09 files into the iCloud page but I am informed:

    Can't be uploaded because the file format isn't supported.

    I have repeated this action for all the iWork apps. Same error message.

    I prefer Dropbox. No problems. Very reliable and very easy to set up.

    Robert

  • capaho Level 4 Level 4 (3,650 points)

    Julian Wright wrote:

     

    I never said MobileMe was free - iCloud is free.

     

    It even say's as much in the MobileMe Terms of Service:

     

    ~ Blah! Blah! Blah! ~

     

    MobileMe (like iCloud) doesn't even let you use your own domain for email. I don't think any professional business would want to use an @me.com email address for their business. It just doesn't give off a professional image - like using a yahoo or hotmail email address.

     

    Your arguments suggest the absence of a business perspective.

     

    The terms of use of my software also contains disclaimers that there's no guarantee it's suitable for any purpose or even that it works at all.  Such disclaimers are written by lawyers who are paid to protect businesses from liability.  In the case of MobileMe, all it really means is that I am responsible for my own data if the iDisc trashes all of my files and that Apple has no liability for any of the consequences of using its services.

     

    I don't use my @me.com account for my business email.  It is, however, useful for push notifications.  At least that service survived the iCloud degradation.

     

    In any case, you can make all the excuses for Apple you want, but iCloud is simply not a suitable replacement for MobileMe.  It's a toy, and making toys is all that Apple seems to care about these days.

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