11 Replies Latest reply: Dec 23, 2011 2:00 PM by Studio X
Marco_Polo Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

I've used color in the past successfuly. Now I'm having trouble with it. I've tried to run different test and the only factor that seems to make a difference is the length of timeline. Up to a minute and half everything is OK. Past a minute and half, the Color preview image just displays electronic gobly-gook. So, I am wondering, is there a memory setting in Color 1.04 that is improperly set that could be giving this problem? I've tried all kind of test otherwise, length seems to be the only factor.

 

Thanks for your help

 

MP


Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.5.8)
  • Nick Holmes Level 7 Level 7 (29,975 points)

    What codec does the footage use?

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    And how are you viewing it? Kona, Decklink, Matrox, or something else feeding a broadcast monitor?

     

    x

  • Marco_Polo Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    The timeline is HDV. HDV goes through Color and comes out the other side Apple pro res. That is not the problem. A 90 sec HDV timeline sent to Color does not present any problems. When I start sending longer timelines to Color, that's when the working image fall apart. I am viewing the preview on the same desktop monitor that I am editing on, an older Apple Cinema Display monitor.

     

    mp

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    Color HATES HDV.

     

    Try converting it to ProRes before you send it.

     

    fwiw - viewing your Color results on a desktop computer screen yields a flawed understanding of what is happening due to the color space differnces between computer and TV video monitors.

     

    Color was designed to be used with a qualified card (Kona, Deckink, MXO, etc) feeding an exernal broadcast monitor.

     

    Good luck,

     

    x

  • Marco_Polo Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    Studio X, thanks for your comments, but they don't really address the issue. I have used Color to time HDV for years without any problems, including with stuff that has aired on my local PBS station. Ditto with the card/monitor factor. I have timed documentaries using Color on a cheapo monitor with good results. Yes, it is nice to cruise in a Cadi, but some of us have to drive a Corolla.

    Please don't take this the wrong way, there is too much of "my computer is bigger than your computer" going on in this forums.

     

    mp

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    The specs as to format and recommended viewing come straight out of the Color manual and experience. 

     

    If your process has worked for you for years, what changed?

     

    The current version of Color is 1.5.3. Have you upgraded software/hardware without updating Color?

     

    When you tried converting to ProRes before sending to Color, did you have the same problem?

     

    x

  • Marco_Polo Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    What changed, that is a good question. Two things. In the past, I used a super cheapo monitor to view the working image. That monitor died and now I am just using my main monitor (an older Apple Cinema Display model). I don't think it is the monitor since it displays correctly a timeline shorter than 90 seconds.

     

    The other factor that changed is that on this timeline I am mixing HDV footage and footage from a Canon 60D. Again, on a timeline shorter than 90 seconds, that is not a problem either.

     

    I know that Color performs better with shorter sequences and that it is better to break up the work. But, 90 seconds is a bit short, not very convenient on a one-hour piece.

     

    I HAVE tried to convert the sequence to ProRes BEFORE sending to Color and that did not make a difference.

     

    I tried all kind of variables. The only factor that made a difference was length. That is why I am wondering if Color has some kind of internal memory setting that could be coming into play. I am not at all a "sofware guy" so this is just a wild guess.

    Thanks,

    mp

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    There is no internal memory setting.

     

    Most issues with Color can be traced to -

     

    a. Sending a material in a non-native codec (only ProRes and Uncompressed are natively supported through the process). As you know, HDV must be converted to ProRes for internal processing and output. Weird things can happen when highly compressed original formats are imported.

    b. sending material that has been retimed (slow motion or sped up), has had filters applied, are stills or other non vanilla video 

    c. projects with mixed frame rates

     

    If you are able to get the shorter clips to work, the issue may be related to your scratch disk. Is it set to a system drive or is it too full? If so, the hard drive may not be able to support sustained ProRes playback rates. Or, the drive may simply be failing.

     

    good luck,

     

    x

  • Marco_Polo Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    Thanks SX. I will keep these notions in mind as I try to diagnose the problem.

     

    mp

  • Marco_Polo Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

    OK, for those who may have been wondering what the problem was, I did some more testing with the process of elimination and the culprit seems to have been too many stills in the timeline. Color was not liking the stills that I had in my sequence. I will time my sequences in Color first and reintroduce the stills after.

     

    mp

  • Studio X Level 7 Level 7 (27,015 points)

    Glad you solved it.

     

    For others who stumble across this thread - the "Before you export your final cut pro project" section of the Color manual is required reading. Strict observation of these rules will save you from a world of hurt.

     

    x