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  • Don Trammell Level 3 Level 3 (620 points)

    Exactly. Aperture is simply too slow at this point in the game. I shoot normaly with a Nikon D4 but just purchased a Nikon D800 to have as a backup camera. The file sizes are simply insanely large. If you want to see Aperture die a slow death, open up an uncompressed RAW and watch the magic die. I would be perfectly content if Apple comes out and says that Aperture is no longer going to be supported. Then we, me, us, etc... could move on and not look back. I hate having one foot in both camps.

  • Terence Devlin Level 10 Level 10 (128,910 points)

    Why do you need these to Geotag your photos? You can do that in iPhoto.

  • DEFii Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Don,

     

    It is really unfortunate what Apple has allowed to happen with Aperture. I just spoke with a photographer this morning who used to be a level 3, "Aperture Solutions Expert." Apply summarily discontinued the solutions expert program, he told me. So, it doesn't appear that outside expertise is being developed. After years of being an Aperture user, I reluntanctly had to look elsewhere. In exasperation, I've briefly chronicled by experience on my website's blog: http://www.photosophistry.com/blog/2014/5/ApertureDebacle

  • Don Trammell Level 3 Level 3 (620 points)

    Great blog post David. I feel your pain. I was forced to make the move to LR. Of course the Aperture faithful will come along and say how great Aperture still remains to Lightroom but the performance of LR speaks for itself. 2010 is when Aperture 3.5 was release (I think this is the date) with only point releases in between. It is simply terrible how Apple treats it professional customers. While I was very happy with Aperture, the newer cameras can simply over power Aperture. Sad day indeed.

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (12,405 points)

    Good points, but let's remain accurate:

     

    Aperture 3.0 was released on February 9, 2010.[11]

     

    Certainly just a typo, but still, inho, worth getting right.

  • Ari5tophanes Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    DEFii wrote:

     

    Don,

     

    It is really unfortunate what Apple has allowed to happen with Aperture. I just spoke with a photographer this morning who used to be a level 3, "Aperture Solutions Expert." Apply summarily discontinued the solutions expert program, he told me. So, it doesn't appear that outside expertise is being developed. After years of being an Aperture user, I reluntanctly had to look elsewhere. In exasperation, I've briefly chronicled by experience on my website's blog: http://www.photosophistry.com/blog/2014/5/ApertureDebacle

     

    While I generally agree with you reasoning, Aperture 4.0 is coming. Closely tied to the Cloud and to iApps and video asset management.

  • DEFii Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Perhaps that is true, Ari5tophanes. Unfortunately, I wasn't left with much choice but to move on. Aperture stopped working well and Apple couldn't offer a solution. For those who chose to patiently wait, I hope you're correct.

  • daikambu65 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Let's say that a new version of Aperture tackled the problem of large libraries freezing the system. What other improvements would match LR-5?

     

    And what are the other frequent complaints from AP users?

     

    I am an amateur, and so I don't have big libraries. And I am not bothered that I have to use the NIK plugins for some alterations. On the whole, I felt that the database aspect of LR was weak compared to AP. And I hated the Modules in LR.

     

    I do  wish the AP could use DxO. I've already got it and while it isn't as powerful as PTlens is, is certainly is automatic and simple.

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (12,405 points)

    daikambu65 wrote:

     

    I am an amateur, and so I don't have big libraries.

     

    Just for the record, I am a professional (not of the machine-gun camp -- I use a camera to make limited edition fine art prints), I run large and huge Libraries, and they all work well.  I know many amateurs who have large Libraries.  They work well, too.

     

    I regularly use a Library with over 3/4 million Images.  SuperDuper tells me there are more than 8 M files in the Library, not including the Originals (they are all referenced).  My system does not freeze.

     

    Afaik, there is no known problem of Libraries freezing because of size.

     

    Any Library that triggers a crash (or worse, a kernel panic) _is_ a big problem.  Any application that is unreliable shouldn't be used.  But IME and those of others I know, Aperture is currently stable.  I have no problem recommending it to photographers, however they make their living.

     

    More apropos to this thread: use what meets your needs.  It's not complex.  If Aperture 3.5 does not meet your needs, and something else does, use it.

  • DEFii Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I am not fan of the modular approach in Lightroom either. Aperture's interface is better in my opinion. Additionally, Lightroom's usage of collections is not as fluid as Aperture's usage of albums. The latter has uniformity regarless of where in the application you're working. Stacking images is easier and better implemented in Aperture also. Overall, I think image mangement is superb in Aperture. Lightroom offers no serious competiion in this regard.

     

    That said, my ultimate move to Lightroom was precipitated by Apeture's bugginess and frequent unresolved crashes. But once I started using Lightroom, you may say my eyes were open. Here are a few things I can do in Lightroom (and would not want to give up) without using plugins and creating new TIFF or PSD files:

     

    1. The upgright feature - perspective correction and fixing converging verticals
    2. Adding multiple adjustments to a single brush, as opposed to creating a new brush for each adjusment
    3. Masking and noise reduction as a part of the sharpening feature
    4. Adding lens profiles that come quite close to replicating what I see on my Nikon's display
    5. Interface with Photoshop is easier and more consistent

     

    So, that's my take on it.

  • Brian.holder Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for the advice about Aperture, to me it appears that Apple has dropped the ball with this one.  Getting info from Apple about updates or new releases is practically impossible. I reluctantly move to Light Room and hope that Apple gets back to where it should be.

     

    I have in the past and still do enjoy Apple product but am disappointed with them on this. 

     

    Terence Devlin,  the photos I take on the iPhone are great and the fact that they are geotagged is a feature that I really like. However,  I take most of my photos with a Canon 70D  which is in a totally different class but it doesn't have a built in GPS. There is a Gps module that can be mounted on the camera to do the geo tagging, but I would prefer to use the gps function in my phone.

  • Andreas Yankopolus Level 2 Level 2 (410 points)

    Ari5tophanes wrote:

     

    While I generally agree with you reasoning, Aperture 4.0 is coming. Closely tied to the Cloud and to iApps and video asset management.

     

    Can't tell you how many times I've heard that over the last three years. It got old about two years ago, and is now well into pathetic.

  • daikambu65 Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Interesting, DEFii. I wasn't aware.

     

    I'm not smart enough with DSLR to understand the comment about lens profiles.

     

    In the end, progress is a ceaseless force and let's hope that the Apple people read these remarks.

     

    I'm not married to Aperture, but that Database power is awfully attractive to me. I import images, keywords and tags are automatically added, and though everything can be thrown in a pile, I can find any shot. No folders or folder hierarchy required. That alone blows my mind whenever I use it. The Collections concept in LightRoom wasn't nearly as intuitive.

  • DEFii Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    My sentiments exactly. Tired of hearing that just before every WWDC, every fall update, every spring update, for the past several years.

  • Ari5tophanes Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    DEFii wrote:

     

    My sentiments exactly. Tired of hearing that just before every WWDC, every fall update, every spring update, for the past several years.

     

    Apple is very tied to hardware, espxially for its Pro apps. Aperture, i part, exists because of the digtial asset management provided through Final Cut and the production system. For all of that the new Mac Pro workstation has been introducd and we are about to see software updates across the board to maximize that power and productivity. Apple is less ties to the photographic (e.g. Photoshop) community. They position according to the markets they speak strongest to, one of which is the Apple ecosystem, another is the strong iOS draw, and another is the combined photo and video asset management crowd.

     

    LR is a great program, but I feel it is like Photoshop...a one trick pony for the pro and serious (very serious) pixel level editor/manager. Aperture as it evolves will likely be positioned more in line with services (iCloud, FB, Flickr), integration (iMovie, FCP, iMovie, Apple TV), and those for whom the Appleshpere is about convenience.