Previous 1 2 Next 24 Replies Latest reply: Jan 16, 2012 5:20 AM by JiminMissouri
M Senft Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Does unmatched music get removed from the computer's library or it just copied up into the cloud?

 

I can have two libraries on two computers scanned as long it's done under the single Apple ID used to subscribe to iTunes Match?

 

How does it actually work on the iPhone (or iPod Touch)?

 

Do I have to remove essentially all music from the phone so I have room to show all the matched tracks available for downloading from cloud to phone? Or does the list of tracks not on the phone work like with purchased apps: That is, the list of apps not on the phone itself is not actually on the phone. And if the list of tracks not on the phone is itself stored on the phone, how much memory does it take up?

 

When I download tracks, I assume I can choose to do it only when I'm on WiFi and thereby avoid 3G?


iPhone 4, Mac OS X (10.7.2), iTunes Match
  • JiminMissouri Level 2 Level 2 (465 points)

    Does unmatched music get removed from the computer's library or it just copied up into the cloud?

    If a song is not matched, a copy of it gets uploaded. 

     

    I can have two libraries on two computers scanned as long it's done under the single Apple ID used to subscribe to iTunes Match?

    Yes.  Songs that are unique to the second computer are added to the cloud and become available to all computers and iOS devices.

     

    How does it actually work on the iPhone (or iPod Touch)?

    You enable iTunes Match on your iOS devices and they are able to see the entire library. You will see a wrning stating Match will replace your "library."  They are talking about the database.  Music you already have on your iOS device remains there.  iOS devices download music as it is played, or if you decide to download it manually.  If you select a song, it will play almost immediately, but it is not streaming the song per se.

     

    There is a lot more to how it works than that, but that's the basics of it.

     

    Do I have to remove essentially all music from the phone so I have room to show all the matched tracks available for downloading from cloud to phone? Or does the list of tracks not on the phone work like with purchased apps: That is, the list of apps not on the phone itself is not actually on the phone. And if the list of tracks not on the phone is itself stored on the phone, how much memory does it take up?

     

    You don't have to remove any music from the phone.  What you will see is a listing that shows both what's on the phone and in the cloud.  You can toggle this off in the settings of your Music App so you see only what is on the phone if that helps.

     

    I don't know how much room your library database (the list of tracks you mentioned) takes up.  I'm not even certain that it's all kept local on the phone.

     

    What you can do if you have a space problem is to delete tracks from your iPhone or iPad that show up once Match has been enabled.  So long as these tracks were in the library of one of the computers you added to iTunes Match, those songs should be in the cloud and you can get them any time you want.

     

    When I download tracks, I assume I can choose to do it only when I'm on WiFi and thereby avoid 3G?

    Yes you can do it that way.  I believe by default the setting that keeps iTunes Match from downloading on 3G is enabled.  You have to disable it in order to use 3G with iTunes Match.

     

    Here is a linke to Apple support documents that will tell you a lot more about iTunes Match.

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3619849

  • JiminMissouri Level 2 Level 2 (465 points)

    I should also have given you this link

     

    http://www.apple.com/itunes/itunes-match/

  • M Senft Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have approximately 12,500 tracks, many purchased on iTunes, many more that won't or can't be matched. So to show all tracks on the iPhone would take approximately how much memory?

     

    And those tracks that can't be matched can be synced the old fashioned way, with the phone connected to the Mac?

  • Michael Allbritton Level 6 Level 6 (16,785 points)

    M Senft wrote:

     

    I have approximately 12,500 tracks, many purchased on iTunes, many more that won't or can't be matched. So to show all tracks on the iPhone would take approximately how much memory?

    Just showing the tracks on your iPhone does not take any memory at all. The tracks only take up space once you download them. Songs purchased from the iTunes Store do not count against the 25K track limit. Any songs that are not "matched" will be "uploaded so your entire library will be available for download on your iPhone.

     

    M Senft wrote:

     

    And those tracks that can't be matched can be synced the old fashioned way, with the phone connected to the Mac?

    No. With iTunes Match enabled direct syncing with iTunes via USB or Wi Fi is no longer possible. All music management will take place directly on the iPhone. And, as stated above, any tracks in your library that are not matched will be uploaded.

     

    I suggest you take a couple of minutes to look over this link that Jim provided <http://www.apple.com/itunes/itunes-match/>.

  • JiminMissouri Level 2 Level 2 (465 points)

    M Senft wrote:

     

    I have approximately 12,500 tracks, many purchased on iTunes, many more that won't or can't be matched. So to show all tracks on the iPhone would take approximately how much memory?

    As Michael said, you really don't need to worry about how many tracks you have in the cloud, just because you can see them on your iPhone.  What matters is how many songs you have actually downloaded to your iPhone.

     

    For example, my music library in iTunes Match is about 5,000 songs and I can see them all on the iPhone.  I have 25Gb of storage, and only 3.2 Gb of that is being used.  Of that, only 544Mb is music.  That is what I have actually downloaded using iTunes Match.

     

    M Senft wrote:

     

    And those tracks that can't be matched can be synced the old fashioned way, with the phone connected to the Mac?

    As MIcheal said, you no longer will sync music connected to the Mac, but that doesn't mean that "music that can't be matched" won't be available to you.  If it is music in your iTunes library on your computer, iTunes Match is designed to make it available to you on all your devices.  If it is not matched, a copy of your original song is uploaded instead.  When you decide to play a song from the cloud, it doesn't matter whether it was matched or uploaded, it is there for you and you play it the same way.

     

    Message was edited by: JiminMissouri

  • M Senft Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    My understanding is that some tracks get neither matched nor copied. As I recollect, reasons why, other than songs long ago ripped to iTunes at too low a bit rate, are unknown.

     

    So given that *some* tracks won't be matched or uploaded, how do those tracks go from the computer to the phone?

     

    (Yes, I know the ones with low bit rates can essentially be saved as AAC and then they would get mathched. But some get rejected and there are no workarounds for those.)

     

    And is it fair to say that when I look at my list of music none of the list is one the phone? The list itself is in the cloud?? This would be like purchased tracks and apps, where you see nothing til you hit the apporpriate widget? In other words, let's say I delete all music from the phone, then convert to iTunes Match. Before I download anything to the phone, Settings will show I have no memory being used for music?

     

    Thanks, you guys are almost doing could enough explaining this that I'm ready to commit!

  • KeithJenner Level 4 Level 4 (1,020 points)

    Tracks that are ineligible can't be put on your phone at present (although there are some workrounds like changing the media type). I would point out that you won't necessarily have many ineligible tracks. I actually have none at all, but I know that all of my music is greater than the minimum bit rate. Unless you have lots of such tracks then this shouldn't be a big issue.

     

    A possible problem could be duplicate tracks, but again probably not to much trouble. I was expecting this to be a big problem for me, but it hasn't proved to be so far.

     

    For an example, out of almost 17,000 attempted matches so far, I have only 66 not yet in the cloud and many of them will be resolved when I get chance.

     

    As for the phone storage, yes if you delete your music it won't take up any room (or maybe a small amount for the artwork/library info).

  • M Senft Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    What are the work arounds? For that matter, what makes a track ineligible? As for numbers, I suspect I'd have at least hundreds, not counting tracks ripped from CDs at least ten-odd years ago (or at least from CDs that old and older). So this can be a huge problem -- a deal-breaker -- if I can no longer get them on the phone.

     

    Yet another issue: Music could still be copied from the Mac onto an iPod (neither an iPhone nor iPod Touch -- have a Nano in mind)?

  • KeithJenner Level 4 Level 4 (1,020 points)

    The work arounds are to tell iTunes that the intelligible songs are something like audiobooks or podcasts. You can then sync those as normal.

     

    I can't give a full list of what makes up ineligible tracks, but song file types and low nitrates are the main causes that I've heard of. People have got round low nitrates by making an AAC version, which increases the bitrate.

     

    I can confirm you can still ANC as normal to iPods, like the nano. As they don't have Internet access, not beng able to do this would be a major problem. You can also chose not to turn on match on an iPhone or iPad and sync as normal.

  • M Senft Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So if I have stuff that can't get into the cloud, it'd stay on the Mac, I turn off Match on the phone, and sync by wire?

     

    Finally; all my answers, I think.

     

    I think now I can bite the bullet.

     

    Thanks!

  • KeithJenner Level 4 Level 4 (1,020 points)

    Yes, that's correct, but it is either/or. You can either have match turned on in which case you can't access ineligible tracks or have it turned off, so you can access them but can't download from the cloud.

  • JiminMissouri Level 2 Level 2 (465 points)

    M Senft - I think it's great that you are trying to learn so much about iTunes Match by asking questions.  It does sound as though you're a cautious person and that's a good thing. 

     

    If you are hoping for a flawless transfer of all of your music to the cloud and a seamless transition to cloud-based music enjoyment, please understand that iTunes Match is not perfect. I personally love the service, but I and other reqular contributors here have responded to enough other first-time users to know it's best for anyone who is thinking about purchasing the service to have a clear understanding of its flaws before making the decision.

     

    Because the title of your first post was, "Step by Step, How Does It Work." It is possible other first-time users may read this thread hoping to get some valuable information before they too, decide to purchase the service.

     

    With those people considering purchasing the service in mind, below is a list of key issues other users have encountered. If you have been reading the board, you probably are aware of many of them.  I personally have had to deal with only some of the minor issues.  Some of these issues are documented by Apple in the support documents I have provided links to in earlier postings to this thread, so I do hope people will take the time to read them.

    ______________________________________

     

    First, keep in mind that iTunes Match is a music-only service.  Other than iTunes purchased music videos that are still for sale in the iTunes store, music videos are not eligible and will not be uploaded or matched.  Neither will audio books. If songs you purchased through the iTunes store are no longer for sale there, those songs will not match either and will have to upload.

     

    If you do not let iTunes Match fully complete its first session before turning Match on other devices, the service may, at least at first, not behave as you expect.  At a minimum, you will see grayed out music tracks where the music will not play, missing artwork, etc. Many user issues seem to stem from not allowing the first session to complete before adding other devices and to trying to manually correct problems while iTunes Match is still processing.  That people would want to be able to access their music on their iPhone immediately is understandable, but the first session can take many hours, even days to complete.

     

    It really does pay to be patient with iTunes Match when running it for the first time. It is safe to interrupt an iTunes Match session though.  You may want to set it up to run overnight.

     

    The new view options for iCloud Status, while very helpful, may need to be re-enabled whenever you re-start iTunes Match. These options will let you know if a track was matched, uploaded, ineligible or waiting to be processed.  However they do not always appear while a match session is running.

     

    Some users have been confused by the changes and additions to the iTunes interface once iTunes Match has been enabled.  For instance, iTunes Match only shows up in the left-hand column while a Match session is running.  To know if you are connected, you must look for a cloud icon next to your music library. A solid cloud means you are connected.  A pulsing cloud means iTunes Match is on, but you are not connected. 

     

    Also, when iTunes Match is turned on, you will see all music that has been added to the cloud, which includes music added from iTunes libraries on other computers and may also include music that you purchased from the iTunes store, but later deleted from your iTunes library.  In order to see your local library the way you are used to seeing it, you must turn iTunes Match off.

     

    If you attempt to make changes to your iTunes library while iTunes Match is processing it, those changes may not "stick."  Changes to metadata in particular should not be made while Match is processing.  If you wish to change metadata, it is best to do it before running iTunes Match.

     

    If you are hoping that iTunes Match will fix your metadata for you, it will not.  Apple has designed iTunes Match to copy your metadata.  It will, however, update changes you make.

     

    iTunes Match will periodically scan your library for changes, but changes won't always be sent to the cloud immediately, nor immediately appear on all devices.  While some patience is warranted, you may be able to speed things along by manually selecting "Update iTunes Match."

     

    iTunes Match will not stay enabled permanently on your computer. It may get turned off without your knowledge, or you may get an alert stating that the session has expired. While turning it back on is not difficult, when you do, you may see a screen that will ask you if you want to "add this computer" to iTunes Match.  It is safe to click to add, because you are not really "adding" the computer, just turning the service on again, but it may ask you for your Apple ID again.  Be sure to use the same ID you used to subscribe to iTunes Match.

     

    If you purchase iTunes Match primarily to obtain higher-quality versions of low-bitrate tracks, you may be disappointed.  While you will get many, many matches, not everything will match. My personal experience with a library of only 5,000 tracks has been that if I had purchased the service only to get higher quality tracks (I did not purchase it for that reason) I paid less than a penny for each upgraded track.

     

    You will likely encounter situations where songs that were uploaded appear to be for sale in the iTunes library and therefore should have been matched.  Whether this is true or not (the song for sale may or may not be identical to what you own), you will likely have situations where all but one or two songs on an album match. Because uploaded songs are copies of what you already have, the transition between matched and uploaded songs may be apparent to you.  It may be a difference in volume, in sound quality, or both.

     

    While most ineligible tracks can be made eligible via making an AAC copy, DRM protected music that the computer you are using to set up iTunes Match isn't authorized to play will be marked as ineligible.  Attempts to add DRM protected tracks may bring up an alert that simply says, "this computer is not authorized" or words to that effect, with no mention that "authorized" is a reference to DRM protection. You will have to authorize the computer before you can process those files.

     

    If you regularly record using an open source program such as Audacity and output AAC files from it, you may have files that iTunes Match will upload, but not play.  Downloaded copies of these files will not play either. Making a second AAC copy within iTunes generally solves this problem.

     

    While not all lossless formats are eligible for iTunes Match, those that are eligible generally end up getting transcoded to AAC during the match session.  It is the AAC version that gets uploaded. While this behavior is normal and documented by Apple, persons unaware of it often don't understand why lossless files, when downloaded from the cloud are not lossless anymore.

     

    Some tracks in your library may turn out to be corrupted, and if so, they will be marked as ineligible.  If you have the original source for these tracks, such as a CD, you may need to make new copies in order to get them into your library.

     

    Some tracks may cause iTunes Match to hang when processing your library.  Corrupted tracks are generally believed to be the cause of many of these hangs. 

     

    iTunes Match will not tell you when it hangs.  Because of this, if a hang does occur, Match may remain in that state until you realize nothing is happening and intervene.  Generally the way to correct this problem seems to be to remove the offending track and re-start iTunes Match.  Because the best way to get iTunes match through the first session as quickly as possible is to just let it run without interruption (for hours or days), the caution here is that you must occasionally check to see that files are being processed.

     

    If you have explicit lyric tracks, there is a chance that some of them will be matched with clean versions.

     

    If you have long versions of some songs, it is possible they will get matched with shorter versions.

     

    If you have mono versions of some Beatles tracks, is is possible they will get matched to stereo versions.

     

    Because of the possiblity of incorrect matches, and various media types that are not eligible for the service, you should not consider iTunes Match as a replacement for a solid backup of your iTunes library.  Even if you are willing to accept that what is in the cloud is not necessarly identical to what you have on your hard drive, you are strongly cautioned that deleting music from your drive without a local backup is a high-risk decision, one that is not recommended you take.

     

    While it is possible to re-submit tracks that did not match, it is not as simple as running Match again.  You will need to delete the tracks from your library and the cloud, then add them back into your library.  The process for doing this is detailed in other postings. be aware that while people have had some success getting more matches this way, there is no guarantee.  There have also been reports of some previously matched tracks getting uploaded the second time.

     

    Syncing your music as you have in the past, via USB sync, may not be possible.  There seems to be conflicting information on this, but there certainly have been reports of it causing problems.  You are advised against jumping between using Match and doing USB syncs without further investigating the various problems some people have had doing so. 

     

    If you have nested playlists, or playlists that include ineligible material such as music videos or audio books, those playlists either will not transfer to the cloud, or if they do, will not work properly.

     

    Playlists may not appear on all devices in the same order that you are used to.

     

    Album art will likely not appear immediately for all of your music on all devices after your first Match session.  While it may be that art is first served up on an as-needed basis, it still may not display for all of your albums and songs when it should.  The more you have added album art from various sources to your library, the greater the chance you will have artwork issues that you will have to manually deal with.  Users have reported some success in resolving their album art issues. There are many postings on the subject.

     

    If you regularly listen to music from your iPhone through a device that also reads your library (some car sound systems) that device may not recognize the iTunes Match library.  It may be necessary to download music and set the phone so that it behaves like it always has in order get past this issue.

     

    Finally, many users get confused about how the service works with iOS devices and how music is displayed on them. 

     

    With the exception of the current model AppleTV, music is not streamed per-se to iOS Devices. While it will begin to play almost immediately upon selecting a song, the song is actually being downloaded.  No music is actually downloaded to your iPhone or iPad unless you play it or take other steps to download it yourself. For instance, you can download entire playlists, individually download songs by clicking on the cloud download icon next to them, or scroll to the bottom of an album track list and hit "download all."

     

    Remember that while iTunes Match is enabled, you will see all the music available to you, but you are seeing a combination of what is in the cloud and locally stored on your device.  If you wish to see only what is on your iOS device, there is a setting in your music app that will let you do that.

     

    If you attempt to download music while on 3G and cannot, you will have to enable the setting that allows iTunes Match downloads via 3G.  This setting is turned off by default.

    ________________________________

     

    These are just some of the issues others have encountered.  It is by no means all-inclusive. As I said, I personally have dealt with only some of the issues.  My overall experience with iTunes Match has been very good. 

  • JiminMissouri Level 2 Level 2 (465 points)

    bump

  • christopherfromstanmore Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So let me get this right.

    If a track is in the cloud and I am not connected to wi-fi, I won't be able to play it.

    I need to download it while on wi-fi first. Is this right.

     

    Also I read above that when I join iTunes Match with my iPhone it won't delete the music on it just add what is in the cloud. This is not what happened. I am at home setting up a PC laptop to use iTunes and Itunes Match. When I turned on iTunes Match on my iPhone all the tracks I had loaded from CD onto my Mac at work and synced with my iphone have now disappeared.

    When I get back to work and turn on iTunes Match on my work Mac will all those tracks (barring invalid ones or errors become available on my iPhone?

     

    Sorry to be thick but I'm getting too old for all this new technology maybe I should have stuck with the wind up gramaphone.

    Thansk for all the above help already posted.

    Yours

    Chris

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