4 Replies Latest reply: Jan 24, 2012 10:28 AM by The hatter
dan wool Level 2 (300 points)

The DAW I use just announced 64bit support. My machine is an early 8-core that will not boot into 64bit mode. Is this even necessary though? Will I still be able to access RAM beyond the 4gb cap while booted into 32bit mode?

 

Thanks!


(2009) 8core 12gb RAM & 2GHz Intel Core i7 MBP 4gb RAM, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • Linc Davis Level 10 (192,377 points)

    Is this even necessary though?

     

    No.

     

    Will I still be able to access RAM beyond the 4gb cap while booted into 32bit mode?

     

    Yes.

  • The hatter Level 9 (60,930 points)

    2009 and you should if you want be able to boot 64-bit mode.

     

    What happens when you try?

     

    Of course you need to insure that your drivers and plugins are 64-bit and will still work.

     

    There are some benefits to 64-bit mode and performance for some apps.

    See if www.macperformanceguide.com has some tips

  • dan wool Level 2 (300 points)

    Despite what my sig says, I have an early 2008 3ghz 8core (I don't know why it says that and I can't figure out how to change it). It simply stays in 32bit mode if I hold down the 6 and 4 keys on startup, but no matter. I've done more research and I believe what Linc Davis says so succinctly is true. Thanks for responding!

  • The hatter Level 9 (60,930 points)

    2008 Mac Pro can, it is supported on server OS.

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3770

     

    Method 1: Startup key combination (for current startup only)

    • If your Mac uses the 32-bit kernel by default, but supports the 64-bit kernel, you can start up using the 64-bit kernel by holding the 6 and 4 keys during startup.
    • If your Mac uses the 64-bit kernel by default, you can start up with the 32-bit kernel by holding the 3 and 2 keys during startup.

    Your Mac will revert to the default kernel the next time you reboot it.

    Method 2: On-disk setting (persistent)

    To select the 64-bit kernel for the current startup disk, use the following command in Terminal:

     

    sudo systemsetup -setkernelbootarchitecture x86_64

     

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3773

     

    Early 2008 implemented Unified EFI which is 64-bit but you need to run 10.6.x and even then... so much for "64-bit" hardware and OS talk we heard for years.

     

    http://macperformanceguide.com/SnowLeopard-Compatibility-software.html

     

    Even if you cannot or do not boot the Mac OS X Snow Leopard kernel into 64-bit mode, you can run your 64-bit apps as 64-bit, and they can take advantage of all the memory in the machine. This was/is possible even with Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard. The main problem being that there are only a handful of 64-bit applications available as of September 2009.

     

    http://macperformanceguide.com/SnowLeopard-64bit.html

     

     

    Somewhere in your "default product" in your profile is where I think the forum pulls that sig