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lucas137 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

how to increase sound in mac pro


Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,205 points)

    Turn the volume up?  Depending on your keyboard there's function keys to control the volume and there is also the Sound system preferences.

     

    Seriously, what do you mean?  Do you want it louder than the sound preference control maximum?  And to what output device?  Built in?  27" apple display?  External speakers?

  • bswhite39 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    I have the same problem, the internal speakers just aren't loud enough.  I'm afraid Apple has done this for no good reason.  I am afraid that I can only help you in one aspect.  I can turn your iTunes up 10x louder.  When you are in iTunes press ⌘⌥2 (Command-Option-2) and it will bring up something called the Equalizer.  When you have the Equalizer open go to the side where you see something called Pre-amp.  If it isn't already click the box that says on and then turn the Pre-amp all the way up, it will make your music ALOT louder, other than that I am afraid I am unable to help you.  So you can see by this that the speakers do go louder, Apple just didn't want them to.

  • Matt Clifton Level 7 Level 7 (29,365 points)

    The internal speakers were never meant to be an impressive final-word solution for anyone. Professionals choosing a Mac Pro will want to add their own speakers, just as with ANY tower PC.

     

    Matt

  • bswhite39 Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    I understand this, but why would I want to buy $70 speakers when the computer COMES with speakers.  I gave him a simple way to make them louder for iTunes alone, and I know that he doesn't want to buy speakers so he can listen to his music louder. 

  • Matt Clifton Level 7 Level 7 (29,365 points)

    I suppose because some people like to listen to sound in stereo. It's all the rage these days, I understand, with kids and their popular beat combos.

     

    Matt

  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,205 points)

    bswhite39 wrote:

     

    I understand this, but why would I want to buy $70 speakers when the computer COMES with speakers.  I gave him a simple way to make them louder for iTunes alone, and I know that he doesn't want to buy speakers so he can listen to his music louder. 

     

    We're in the mac pro section.  The mac pro does not come with speakers.  It comes with one dinky little speaker mainly intended for simple alert sounds and basic audio.  IMO no one is seriously going to use that one cheap little speaker for listening to anything else.  That's what audio out via analog jack, digital optical, and USB are for.

  • lucas137 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I FOUND THE EQUALIZER  IN ITUNES BUT DO YOU HAVE TO USE WITH I TUNES OR CAN YOU USE IT WHILE WATCHING A NEFLIX MOVIE THAT YOU COULD HARDLY HEAR

  • Matt Clifton Level 7 Level 7 (29,365 points)

    Dude. First, why the capital letters? Second, as we've pointed out, the internal Mac Pro speaker (that's singular) isn't meant for listening to anything other than the boot chime. The iTunes equalizer only affects iTunes.

     

    My advice? Buy a set of cheap PC speakers from your local electronics store. Probably be able to get a pair under $20. That will give you volume. When you want quality, upgrade to something better.

     

    Matt

  • lucas137 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I HAVE ALTEC LANSING XT1  BUT IT'S NOT LOUD ENOUGH   AND IT'S NOT 20 DOLLARS

  • stevejobsfan0123 Level 8 Level 8 (37,195 points)

    Seriously now, enough with the caps. It's shouting.

  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,205 points)

    Altec Lansing XT1 -- hmm, USB powered.  Maybe they aren't getting enough power to drive them any louder.  Do you have additional stuff connected to USB (besides maybe mouse and keyboard)?  Do you have a external powered hub you can try?

  • Cymru_Pride Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The 'Pro' in title of the device is, in all realities, just marketing - so making an off topic statement about what 'professionals' do is not helping him... but based on your other comments, your goal was to belittle and mock the original poster.   I would bet that most owners are 'professionals' in the sense that 'they have jobs' and are not using the MacBook Pro as the primary device to generate an income... to most it is merely a very nice computer to do work on.

    If you had more experience with your MacBook Pro (I assume you own at least one) or if you have ever used VMware Fusion or BootCamp for Windows or Linux distros you would have noticed that the speaker in the MacBook Pro can very easily go much louder.

     

    And as for your very small comment about stereo - I for one enjoy watching some streaming training videos or simple documentaries on occasion and more often than not I must resort to abandoning OS X to simply hear anything over the general noises around the office or house - it is obviously an artificial restriction (read 'software not hardware') and the original poster has a very valid point and a very innocent question.

  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (60,175 points)

    This has nothing to do with laptops, notebooks, macbooks, a lot of people somehow post questions though about their MacBook Pros in this forum by mistake.

     

    The audio digital ports on the back are what are meant for going to external speakers - of whatever level and quality one wishes or needs for causal listening, games, etc or better, instead of buying a PCIe audio card for "professional audiophiles"

     

    The internal speakers are probably there because the system has to be able to communicate audible feedback for basic booting and alerts (bong) and not for surround sound or movies... or drowning out kids and dogs and disturbances in the background.

  • Leslie Bell Level 2 Level 2 (340 points)

    I wouldn't even call it an internal speaker as most people know them. It sounds like some sort of vibrating chip. Also, when you raise your iTunes preamp up it radically compresses the dynamic range of the music. Of course with most modern mixes no one would notice much change. I have an Apogee Duet which has tons of gain so I'm able to keep the preamp at the bottom. Even in the middle we've noticed dynamic range compression.

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