6 Replies Latest reply: Mar 3, 2012 2:36 PM by Niku
Niku Level 2 Level 2 (285 points)

I see that this problem has been raised before and that no one was able to offer any suggestions. Well maybe things have changed. It's worth a try anyway. My problem is that the comma key on my keyboard just stopped working on my keyboard. It's a wireless keyboard.I think it came with the computer but I don't remember. Anyway does anone know how I can get it woking again?

  • jgelements Level 3 Level 3 (520 points)

    You will have to isolate to see if it can be fixed via software or if you will need to replace the keyboard.

     

    Right off the bat, boot to your install DVD or to Lion Recovery, depending on which OS is installed.

     

    In the install volume, select Utilities > Terminal.

     

    In Terminal's window, test the comma key. Does it work?

     

    If not, you can try removing and re-pairing the bluetooth keyboard, but if it still doesn't work, you will have to replace it.

     

    If it does work, then it is your software, and further isolation is necessary.

     

    From here, I would test a new user. I would wager that the issue is going to be user specific if it is isolated to the software, but you should double-check with this step.

     

    If it is in fact user specific, meaning that it only happens in your user, then enable the keyboard viewer in Sys Prefs > Language & Text > Input. Open the keyboard and press the comma key. Does the software keyboard show that it is detecting the comma key being depressed?

  • Niku Level 2 Level 2 (285 points)

    jgelements wrote:

     

    You will have to isolate to see if it can be fixed via software or if you will need to replace the keyboard.

     

    If not, you can try removing and re-pairing the bluetooth keyboard, but if it still doesn't work, you will have to replace it.

     

    Open the keyboard and press the comma key. Does the software keyboard show that it is detecting the comma key being depressed?

    -----------------

    Sorry for the delay, but I didn't know anyone had answered my question until now. Anyway, your remarks are interesting, but is the keyboard designed to be opened? Won't it break? Do I just insert, say, a knife blade and twist? You probably have noticed the commas above. They are there because I bought another keyboard; however, I don't like it at all, so I would still very much like to repair my broken Apple wireless keyboard.

  • Don Archibald Level 10 Level 10 (101,275 points)

    Open the keyboard and press the comma key.

     

    I believe what was meant was to open the Keyboard Viewer, not the physical keyboard. With the Keyboard Viewer open, press the comma key on the physical keyboard; does the graphic in the Keyboard Viewer respond accordingly?

     

    Then open a blank TextEdit document. Using the mouse, click the comma key on the virtual keyboard in Keyboard Viewer. Is a comma then 'typed' into the TextEdit document?

     

    Those two tests will help determine whether the issue is software (in the Mac) or hardware (in the keyboard).

     

    If the replacenment keyboard you have tried works okay, then that usually means the fault with the other keyboard is in the keyboard itself.

     

    You can get a replacement Apple keyboard at the Apple Store. Note, though, that current models sold there require a minimum of OS X 10.6.8 for full functionality.

  • jgelements Level 3 Level 3 (520 points)

    Don properly provided you with the full explanation for isolating the issue.

     

    To answer your last question, no, the Apple wireless keyboard is not designed to be opened and repaired by the end user.

  • Niku Level 2 Level 2 (285 points)

     

    Don Archibald wrote:

     

    If the replacenment keyboard you have tried works okay, then that usually means the fault with the other keyboard is in the keyboard itself.

     

    ---------

    Well, every electronic piano keyboard I've ever had (three of them) eventually had some keys go dead. The first time it happened, I found a shop where the repairman fixed it by scrapping off the corrosion.  Might not the same problem occur with computer keyboards? I must assume that the problem with my Apple wireless keyboard is in the keyboard itself. Anyway, is it possible to dismantle a Apple keyboard for checking and maintenance without ruining it?

     

  • Niku Level 2 Level 2 (285 points)

    jgelements wrote:

     

    Don properly provided you with the full explanation for isolating the issue.

     

    To answer your last question, no, the Apple wireless keyboard is not designed to be opened and repaired by the end user.

    ----------

    Sorry, but I didn't see that. Anyway, now I know. Thanks.