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buckaroo14 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have seen online, in forums, and now retailers selling the Macbook Pro's with 16Gb?

 

I have the 2.2Ghz with 8Gb, i7 from around April 2011..

 

I spoke to apple and they say 8Gb is max, but all other ads, and online forums now say it takes 16Gb?

 

Is this true but not officially supported?

 

And does it actually see the full 16Gb or is it compromised because Apple say its not supported?

 

Am confused..?


MacBook Pro i7 8GB - iPhone 4, Mac OS X (10.6.7)
  • OGELTHORPE Level 8 Level 8 (39,985 points)

    Your MBP will accept 16Gb of RAM.  If you go to the web sites of OWC and Crucial, two of the best third party vendors, both sell 8GB RAM chips for MBP.  They both guarantee that is will recognized and work successfully in a MBP.  The technician that you spoke with was probably towing the official Apple line regarding RAM.  When the first 2011 MBPs came out, Apple designed them for a total of 8GB of ram but subsequent events have proven they can accept 16GB. 

     

    If you have a need for that much RAM, feel secure that there will be no issues if you purchase it from either of the above two vendors, provided it meets all of the other specifications.

     

    Ciao.

  • shldr2thewheel Level 7 Level 7 (25,855 points)

    16gb is the max.  Apple says 8gb is the limit because that was how much ram was available for your mac when it was first tested.  Since then, 16gb has become available and Apple does not go back and retest when higher ram capacities become available.

  • buckaroo14 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Great stuff!

     

    Yes apple say no its only 8Gb (which i have installed) but EVERYONE else is saying 16Gb, and selling it with 16GB!

     

    So if I install 2x 8Gb, it will be and see the full 16Gb to be a powerhouse!?! 

  • shldr2thewheel Level 7 Level 7 (25,855 points)

    you will only see the full benefits of the 16gb of ram if your mac needs it.  If your mac does not need that much ram, it will just be a waste.

  • buckaroo14 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well, I use many programs at once, plus Parallels and Windows, and programs within that too..

     

    So 16Gb maybe too much, but at least I know I can use alot of programs at once and not worry..

  • shldr2thewheel Level 7 Level 7 (25,855 points)

    buckaroo14 wrote:

     

    So 16Gb maybe too much, but at least I know I can use alot of programs at once and not worry..

     

    correct

  • OGELTHORPE Level 8 Level 8 (39,985 points)

    The easiest way to determine if you need additional memory is by opening Activity Monitor>System Memory  after a session of CPU intensive tasks.  Look to see if 'Page outs' is 10%+ of 'Page ins'  If that is the case, then additional RAM in those circumstances would be beneficial.  Otherwise an upgrade to 16GB of RAM would be of no value.

     

    Ciao.

  • tylercat Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    That's very insightful. I never knew quite how to just that. I often look to the activity monitor to try and just, plus knowing which powerhouses' take up a lot

  • OGELTHORPE Level 8 Level 8 (39,985 points)

    I have 8 GB of RAM in my 2010 MBP and the only times that I find that I need it is when I do some video compiles.  16 GB in a note book is a lot and I can only see the need if it is for some vocational purpose where computer time is a financial factor and  if one is doing some very esoteric computations such as creating weather models and the like.

     

    I would say that in the majority of cases where  an individual has installed 16 GB of RAM in their MBP, all they have achieved is bragging rights (as well as having spent a lot of money).

     

    Ciao.

  • shakefists Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    I wouldn't mind bragging that I'm loading 8GB worth of drum samples in BFD all loaded into the speedy bus of SS RAM verses loading it from the mechanical HD and then the HD passing it off slowly to my RAM.

     

    I seem to find more and more users needing more RAM due to the abundance of modern day applications being written to take advantage of the high speed storage alternative. For example, sample triggering and their large libraries, video paging, O/S emulation such as Parallels, and audio production. After all, we're Mac users demanding the most from the intense tasks we throw at our machines daily. Not all of us are just emailers and pron-sorters.

  • buckaroo14 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I looked at the Activity monitor, and although my "swap used = 0 bytes" when running 3 programs with 8Gb, my "system memory" used page  = 5.83Gb of 8Gb , so getting near to its total?

  • OGELTHORPE Level 8 Level 8 (39,985 points)

    What ever you were running, your MBP was handling it well within its capacity based on the numbers you reported.  Even if you get 7.98 used, by it self, does not mean that more RAM will enhance performance, unless the MBP starts swapping data which is measured by the 'Page ins' and 'Page outs'.  Even then it is a question of the degree, hence the 10%+ ratio I mentioned in my prior response.  If you find that in several sessions you meet this threshold, then more RAM is justified.

     

    Probably in a year the 8 GB chips will cost $50 and we will be asking if 32 GB will be worth the  expense.

     

    Ciao.

  • SrgMssr Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

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