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marc_ny Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I just sent a 6 month old macbook pro off for warranty repair.  I received a call from apple telling me that they would not honor the warranty because of water damage.  My computer has never been subjected to any liquid either by accident or intentionally.  I'm wondering if the seals on the computer are faulty?

Has anyone else had a similar experience?  This repair has been quoted to me as $755 without tax.

I'm interested in finding anyone else who has run into this problem with the hopes of getting apple to re-think their manufacturing and testing process.  Maybe they screwed up and don't want to admit it?

 

Laptops are meant to be taken from place to place aren't they?  They should be able to withstand humidity and be safe from "water damage" even in the rain if they are kept in the safety of their protective carrying case shouldn't they? 

 

Let me know if you have had this problem too so I can see if this is a common occurance.


MacBook Pro (13-inch Late 2011), Mac OS X (10.7.3)
  • wjosten Level 10 Level 10 (93,715 points)

    They are actually Liquid Submersion Indicators (LSI), and are tiny white “stickers” that turn red when they come into contact with liquid. They are located throughout your MacBook Pro. They are not triggered by humidity.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (30,105 points)

    As wjosten says, the indicators that tell them it has gotten wet are not triggered by humidity.  However, carelessness in a humid environment can cause the problem.  For example, if you have your MBP in the bathroom and take a very hot, steamy shower, that can cause condensation on and inside the machine, especially if it's on and the fans are sucking humidity inside.  Or if you take your MBP outside during the winter and it gets very cold, and then you take it back inside a hot, humid environment, that can cause the problem as well.  (Photographers have been dealing with such problems for decades by putting cameras in plastic bags before coming back inside after long winter shoots.)

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    I would ask to see the damage. This is one way for Apple to void the warranty.

     

    But then do you know for a fact that no one else has never spilled anything on it?

  • marc_ny Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    neither the apple rep nor the apple supervisor mentioned anything about the stickers showing water damage.  They did say that the components had corrosion problem.

  • marc_ny Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    That's some really good points, and things to know to protect your computer.  Including them in the little owner's booklet that comes with the computer would be helpful.

    We've had a very mild winter here in the midwest, but taking a computer outside in a protective bag or attache case walking from class to class or commuting back and forth to work, and then turning it on inside warm buildings is a pretty common practice.  If a laptop isn't made for this type of use, or if protective measures need to be taken, don't you think the customer should be made aware of this?

    This isn't common knowledge unless apparently you are a pro photographer.  How about warnings and best practices?

  • marc_ny Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I know for a fact that there has been no spillage on the computer by anyone!

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    Funny part is, well not really funny, I've been kdoiing that with PC notebooks for years and never had any of these problems. Now that I own and Expensive Macbook Pro, supposedly built better then a PC notebook, I have to worry about how I transport it in cold or hot humid weather going outdoors then back into conditions spaces.

     

    Apple has given you the shaft.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (30,105 points)

    Keeping a laptop inside a good, closed laptop bag while it is outside for a short period of time should prevent it from really getting cold enough for condensation to be a big problem.  It's only if the machine is outside in the cold for a good long time, so the cold can seep in through the bag, that it would be a problem.  The average person is unlikely to encounter this.

     

    But, of course, those were just examples of how condensation problems can occur.  There are plenty of others.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (30,105 points)

    Now that I own and Expensive Macbook Pro, supposedly built better then a PC notebook, I have to worry about how I transport it in cold or hot humid weather going outdoors then back into conditions spaces.

     

    ????!  Any electronic device that gets very cold and is then brought into a humid environment will have problems.  This is not specific to Macs.

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    Thomas A Reed wrote:

     

    Now that I own and Expensive Macbook Pro, supposedly built better then a PC notebook, I have to worry about how I transport it in cold or hot humid weather going outdoors then back into conditions spaces.

     

    ????!  Any electronic device that gets very cold and is then brought into a humid environment will have problems.  This is not specific to Macs.

    My 9+ year old Dell i8200 has never suffered this problem and it has been used in very different weather conditions for all of those 9+ years.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (30,105 points)

    Then you have not had it outside long enough to get its innards truly cold, or have not brought it back into a humid enough environment to cause problems.  Honestly, is there a point to this?  Surely you are not arguing that condensation inside an electronic device due to a cold-to-warm air transition is impossible?  If so, I'll have to let a lot of professional field photographers know they're being silly.

  • fane_j Level 4 Level 4 (3,660 points)

    Pardon my curiosity -- but did your MBP ever travel by air in the checked (rather than carry-on) luggage?

  • marc_ny Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    no, the computer has never been more than 4 feet off the ground.

  • RonC1958 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Interesting.  This just happened to my niece as well.  The machine has NEVER been subjected to moisture or a spill.  She was home from college one weekend and the machine was working fine.  She returned to school on Monday morning and the machine didn't work.  Apple said they replaced everything they can and now claim there is water damage and want $755 to fix it.  Could this be a way Apple is ducking their warranty on a defective machine?

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