Previous 1 2 Next 19 Replies Latest reply: Apr 17, 2012 10:48 AM by Courcoul
Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hi everyone,

 

This may seem like a really stupid question but I have to ask to be sure. Since the workings of SSD technology is new to me (hard drives, however, are old hat), I'm wondering if there's any point to getting one of those Apps like iBoost or the like to analyze my "hard drive" on my MacBook Pro (which has an SSD and not a HD). I imagine that there are a lot of Hard Drive "maintenance" utilities which are utterly useless with SSD technology for like bad sectors, analyzing a HD and the like?

 

Just thought I'd ask before running any of them.

 

Thanks for any info.

 

Nat.


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7), Time Machine, External Drive
  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,215 points)

    I do not recommend doing anything to your SSD.  You don't want utilities pushing stuff around needlessly doing writes to ununsed cells.  Those utilities are mainly designed for HDD's not SSD's.  About the only concession you might make to the SSD is to try to install as much ram as possible to minimize paging (writing to the backing store, virtual memory, swap space...pick your favorite term).

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Yeah, that's exactly what I thought. I am definitely not an expert on SSD's, though I do understand the most basic design of it, and it isn't an HDD. The thing is, with the amount of Mac Apps out there for maintenance, nobody has mentioned this in any of their apps and I figured it would be an important enough point for many since so many Mac owners have a Mac Air with SSD or a MacBook Pro with an SSD as I do.

     

    I did want to run the nightly/weekly/monthly scripts for OS X maintenance that are usually run overnight since I don't keep my laptop active during the night. I used to use Onyx for that, but I'm afraid of what it might do to the SSD. Any suggestions?

  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,215 points)

    Heh, your too quick   I wasn't finished editing my post.

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Lol Sorry, I'll wait.

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Ah, yes I have the max ram installed. 8 Gigs.

     

    I've heard that SSD's don't "last as long" as HDD's. I just got this MBP about three months ago so I'm curious what the typical "life span" of this SSD would be with heavy use?

  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,215 points)

    I did want to run the nightly/weekly/monthly scripts for OS X maintenance that are usually run overnight since I don't keep my laptop active during the night. I used to use Onyx for that, but I'm afraid of what it might do to the SSD. Any suggestions?

     

    If your machine is sleeping when one of the daily, weekly, or monthly maintenance task is scheduled to run then it will still be run shortly after you wake your machine.  If the machine is off then it is not rescheduled until it is time to run the next day.

     

    The fact that the periodic maintenance tasks are run after waking from sleep is different that it was from earlier systems like Tiger since cron is no longer used to schedule these tasks.

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Yeah I just close the lid and it sleeps, and I wake it up by opening the lid again in the morning, so I assume it's running automatically now? That's awesome. I guess I don't need to run a utility anymore.

     

    That's a welcome change.

  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,215 points)

    Here's some related reading you might find interesting:

     

    Optimizing Mac OS X for SSD drives

     

    MacPerformanceGuide (look at the articles in the SSD section)

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you very much. Exactly what I was looking for.

  • lollorenzo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi. I would like to know if you've done these operations to maintain the ssd drive and if you appear to be useful. In particular the one concerning the sleeping mode.

    Thanks.

     

    1. Sleeping mode

    By default, when closing the lid on a MacBook, the content of the ram is saved to disk for safety. The ram is still powered on however, and is used when starting up again. The content saved on disk is only used in case of a power loss. This behavior can be changed, at the cost of some safety, so that memory content is not saved to disk. On the bright side, you also save some disk space (equal to the amount of your RAM).

     

    (Sorry for my bad english... )

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Yes, I did. And it gave me back 8 gigs and, with an SSD, it's really nice. I've had no problems with doing that in the last month.

     

    If you have an SSD, I can say that it's worth trying out and see how you feel about it. For me, it's been great.

  • lollorenzo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks. So you have open Terminal and make this?

     

    We can start by checking the current setting, fire up Terminal.app and type the following.

    $ sudo pmset -g | grep hibernatemode hibernatemode     3

    3 is the default mode, we want to change this to 0 to disable disk writes.

    $ sudo pmset -a hibernatemode 0

    Now we can remove the old sleepimage.

    $ sudo rm /var/vm/sleepimage

     

     

    But "closing the lid on a MacBook" and Sleep mode on Apple menu it's the same thing?

  • Nat Harari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Yup, that's exactly what I did.

  • lollorenzo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    And what do you think about this: "closing the lid on a MacBook" and Sleep mode on Apple menu it's the same thing?

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