3 Replies Latest reply: Apr 12, 2012 2:42 AM by noondaywitch
silverado93 Level 1 Level 1 (15 points)

After a bit of research tonight, I found that the website "Cult of Mac" suggests using either "FlashBack Checker" or F-Secure Flashback Removal Tool to check and remove the malware.  Which program have Mac users used and had good luck with it?  I don't know anything about Terminal and will not even go in it, as of course, I don't want to mess up my Mac Mini.

 

As suggested in many articles I've read, I've disabled Java in Safari.  I checked Firefox and it didn't even list  Java at all in the plug-in list.  My Java version does need to be update to 7.  Should I still do that even though I've disabled it? 

 

Always wondered why my Mac never told me about software updates.  Found in a Mac Snow Leopard book that a Mac checks for updates in your time zone starting at 3:15am!  Is there any way of changing the time for checking?  System preferences didn't show anything.  Speaking of System preferences, when I went to check the software updates, I noticed that there was a "Flash" icon showing under the "Other" row!  I hope and pray that isn't the Flashback malware!  I think I remember Adobe Flash wanting to update recently, but I said no as I recall reading that that could be false with Windows.  So I figured it could apply to Mac as well.

 

It infuriates me that there are those in the world that have nothing better to do, but to make up viruses and malware etc. to mess up others computers etc. Then we go through the time, effort and grief of having to fix what they've messed up!  Hackers are pond scum!

 

silverado 93


Mac mini, Mac OS X (10.6.8), Early 2009, 120GB HD, 4GB RAM
  • X423424X Level 6 Level 6 (14,215 points)

    After a bit of research tonight, I found that the website "Cult of Mac" suggests using either "FlashBack Checker" or F-Secure Flashback Removal Tool to check and remove the malware.  Which program have Mac users used and had good luck with it?  I don't know anything about Terminal and will not even go in it, as of course, I don't want to mess up my Mac Mini.

     

    Up till today I was posting my own (sorry terminal) commands for a top level check for the trojans.  But I looked at F_Secure's Flashback Removal Tool.  In my opinion this is currently the most complete and reliable tool available.

  • MadMacs0 Level 5 Level 5 (4,605 points)

    silverado93 wrote:

     

    As suggested in many articles I've read, I've disabled Java in Safari.  I checked Firefox and it didn't even list  Java at all in the plug-in list.  My Java version does need to be update to 7.  Should I still do that even though I've disabled it?

    Absolutely since you've only disabled it in Safari. You may have applications that use Java Runtime Environment and the next malware could easily exploit that same hole elsewhere.

  • noondaywitch Level 6 Level 6 (8,130 points)

    silverado93 wrote:

     

    As suggested in many articles I've read, I've disabled Java in Safari.  I checked Firefox and it didn't even list  Java at all in the plug-in list.  My Java version does need to be update to 7.  Should I still do that even though I've disabled it? 

     

    Yes, in case you need it for the odd web site. (It appears some US banking sites won't work without it).

    But until you do need it, go to Applications > Utilities > Java Preferences and uncheck the boxes under 'General'.

    That will disable Java completely until you reactivate it if needed.

     

    Always wondered why my Mac never told me about software updates.  Found in a Mac Snow Leopard book that a Mac checks for updates in your time zone starting at 3:15am!  Is there any way of changing the time for checking?

     

    No, but I never allow auto checking anyway - always manually, at my convenience.

     

    I noticed that there was a "Flash" icon showing under the "Other" row!  I hope and pray that isn't the Flashback malware!

     

    No, it's the Flash Player preference pane. You'd do well to have a look in there and turn off the facility for sites to use your camera, and severely restrict or disable the storage of Locally Stored Objects (aka Flash cookies), as these can be used to respawn persistent cookies and links.