Previous 1 2 Next 16 Replies Latest reply: Jan 10, 2014 9:35 PM by DaCoolidge
ScottBBB Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have a MacBook Pro running OS X 10.6.8.  I just added a wifi network with a hidden SSID to my saved, preferred networks list.  Unlike networks with visible SSIDs, my Mac won't automatically reconnect to it.  Does anyone have a solution to this?  I hate having to re-enter the password each time.

 

Thanks,
Scott

 


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8), 24" Cinema
  • ds store Level 7 Level 7 (30,315 points)

    A hidden network is supposed to be hidden.

     

    So a Mac will only ask if it's there upon a boot, not upon wake up or disconnect.

     

    The Mac won't go asking "joe are you there" everywhere it goes or it give up the identity of the hidden network and hackers follow the suspect to the hidden network.

     

    Hidden networks are only hidden to other users, not to hackers with sniffer software, so it's of little security value for most people. MAC Address filtering is a waste too, as it's easy to copy someone else's MAC address that is allowed on the network.

     

    Read here and really secure your network

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/docs/DOC-3047

     

    https://discussions.apple.com/community/notebooks/macbook_pro?view=documents

     

     

    Secure your network as instructed by the User Tip

     

    then use your Mac to connect, enter the password for "guest internet" and when it asks to save in Keychain, say yes.

     

    boom your done. it will connect all the time when your in range.

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    Just why are you hiding the SSID? That is no security as hackers can still find it by sniffing packets. All that really does is make it harder for YOU to connect to YOUR own network, as you have found out.

     

    Turn broadcast SSID on and then you won't have to post on a forum when it doesn't connect.

  • ScottBBB Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I will review the info at those links, thank you.

     

  • ScottBBB Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It's not my network, so it's not up to me to decide if they hide their SSID or not.

     

    Scott

     

  • GLJoe Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't mean to be a hater, but I don't agree.  Mac should interoperate with the world as-is, not require the world to change to accomodate it.  This is always the problem with propietary/closed systems.  It is typical of the "Our way or the highway" Apple mentality.

     

    The Hidden SSID does not afford much protection anymore, but does provide *some* protection.  Furthermore, what the Mac should do is allow you to remember a defined network and *disable* connect automatically to eliminate broadcast for a hidden SSID.  That would eliminate the broadcasting and allow users to choose that location/network and connect to it.

     

    In a large enterprise where a laptop may lose connectivity briefly in the elevator or basement, to have to redefine your SSID, enter username, password and choose 802.1x profile every time is a shortsighted design choice.  I can understand why they did.  But to defend it as the 'best' way to do things...that's silly.

  • Chris Murphy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    ds store, Some of your information is not correct. First, a Mac running 10.6.8 and perhaps older can remember a hidden network SSID upon waking from sleep. Second, hidden SSID's may not add security, but they are beneficial in dense urban areas where dozens of your neighbor's SSIDs clutter your Airport menu. If your network only serves an apartment with one or two people in a dense urban setting, hiding your SSID is a small service to everyone.

     

    ScottBBB,

    1) open Applications>Utilities>Disk Utility

    2) repair your permisions.

    3) open Applications>Utilities>Keychain Access

    4) chose Keychain First Aid from the Keychain Access menu. Repair your keychain
    5) type Airport in the search field of Keychain access

    6) find the network you are trying to repair in your keychain

    7) delete the entry by control clicking on it and choosing 'delete "My Network"' or choosing Edit>Delete

    8) re-login to the wifi network

    9) no need to reboot it should just work

     

    http://osxdaily.com/2012/02/22/mac-wont-remember-a-wireless-network-password-her es-how-to-fix-it/

  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)

    Make sure your WiFi router has the most current firmware revision available installed.

     

    I've run a closed network since Mac OS X 10.2 and have never had issues reconnecting after waking from sleep.

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    Chris Murphy wrote:

     

    ds store, Some of your information is not correct. First, a Mac running 10.6.8 and perhaps older can remember a hidden network SSID upon waking from sleep. Second, hidden SSID's may not add security, but they are beneficial in dense urban areas where dozens of your neighbor's SSIDs clutter your Airport menu. If your network only serves an apartment with one or two people in a dense urban setting, hiding your SSID is a small service to everyone.

     

     

    Not sure why anyone is replying to this 2 month old thread. The OP stated that is wasn't his network. In that case he needs to take it up with whoever owns the netework as I don't help anyone that is trying to connect to someone elses network, whether it is OK or Not with the owner of that network. And the OP hasn't replied since April 15th. I guess he figured it out, or contacted the owner and straightened out the problem, Or Not.

     

    Second hiding the SSID does nothing to protect your WiFi network, it IS NOT any type of security. As to your assumption that it is better in heavily populated WiFi areas that is just bogus. I have 15+ WiFi SSIDs showing, Big Deal. I know which one is mine and it is the one I am connected to. My WiFi enabled devices connect automatically to it and don't pop up those other SSIDs unless I open the WiFi connection section on my WiFi devices. I never even knew how many there were until I read your reply and checked just to have a number to post in my reply. Like I say BIG DEAL.

     

    Notr sure what the rest of your reply is about, never bothered to read is or follow the link you posted.

  • ScottBBB Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    OP here...yes, the problem solved itself, in that the MBP suddenly starting connecting to the hidden-SSID network on its own.  Don't know why it didn't do it the first time.

     

  • Chris Murphy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Shootist007, The age of the thread is irrelevant. Nobody offered a valid solution to the original poster's problem. Anyone with the same problem now has a documented solution. Please take the time to read and understand both the problem and the proposed solution before you decide to troll this discussion board.

  • William Kucharski Level 6 Level 6 (14,890 points)

    Shootist007 wrote:

     

    Second hiding the SSID does nothing to protect your WiFi network, it IS NOT any type of security.

     

    That's incorrect; it's a measure of security, like the locks on your doors.

     

    Locking your doors stops no one who wants in, it just convinces those looking for an easy target to go elsewhere.

     

    The same with a hidden SSID.

  • Shootist007 Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    William Kucharski wrote:

     

    Shootist007 wrote:

     

    Second hiding the SSID does nothing to protect your WiFi network, it IS NOT any type of security.

     

    That's incorrect; it's a measure of security, like the locks on your doors.

     

    Locking your doors stops no one who wants in, it just convinces those looking for an easy target to go elsewhere.

     

    The same with a hidden SSID.

    Not really. Hiding the SSID would be like putting a cloak of invisibility over your house. Which would make it harder for you to find your house. The locks on the doors is like the password used on your WiFi connection. The stronger the locks (password) the harder it is to break in.

     

    But in the end that only thing that happens when you hide the SSID is it makes it harder for YOU to connect to YOUR WiFi.

  • GLJoe Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Again incorrect.  Your house doesn't move and is no harder for you to find because it's always there at the same address.

     

    Hiding your SSID does add a layer of security.  It's only hard to connect to if you're using an Apple product.

  • ScottBBB Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I suggest you guys start a new thread if you want to argue about the merits of hiding the SSID.  It's off the original topic, which was how to deal with a hidden SSID, not to ask if it's a good idea or not.  Besides, I doubt you'll change each other's minds about it, so you're wasting your breathe.  I think it's turned into a ******* contest.

     

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