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  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    RRFS wrote:

     

    Solid State Drives. They are both physically smaller and hold less data 60GB-560GB and they can get pricey but the read write speeds are 10 or more times faster. My unit runs much cooler than with the 500GB drive I had before and with 128GB for Applications and file swapping internally and 3TB for Storage Externally I'm a happy camper. I used a Crucial 128SSD and maxed my memory while I was at it. I'm keeping it for as long as they make software for it now.

     

     

    I did some quick googling RRFS.

     

    Thanks for the info, but I had better stick with HDD. I'd be much less confident trying to install it.

     

    Cheers though.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    WZZZ wrote:

     

    NeddySeagoon wrote:

     

    SSD = solid state drive. This is a whole new bag of cats for me.

    Very expensive for much less capacity. And, if you keep your data on an external, that, in turn, needs to be backed up on another external.

     

    I do intend to to also get another external drive and a large supply of blank DVDs for essential back ups.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    bit-tech.net gave a good review for the WD Caviar Black, but the Samsung F3 was reviewed a few days later to much more applause.

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,545 points)

    That would be preferable. If not at least one that can be user disabled.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Kappy wrote:

     

    That would be preferable. If not at least one that can be user disabled.

     

    Thanks, I've googled this a bit, but I can't find any mention of it in reviews or specifications.

     

    How can I tell if it is possible on a certain hard drive?

     

    Also, you said earlier that up to 3TB is possible, but I was thinking it was a max of 2TB

     

    I found thos on about.com :-

     

    17-inch, 20-inch, and 24-inch late 2006 iMacs

    Model identifier: iMac 5,1, late 2006 model

    Model identifier: iMac 5.2, late 2006 model

    Model identifier: iMac 6,1, late 2006 model

    Memory slots: 2

    Memory type: 200-pin PC2-5300 DDR2 (667 MHz) SO-DIMM

    Maximum memory supported: 4 GB total. Use matched pairs of 2 GB per memory slot. Apple officially supports only 3 GB of RAM in these models. You can install 4 GB, but your iMac won't use all of the available RAM.

    Hard drive type: SATA I 3.5-inch hard drive; SATA II drives are compatible.

    Hard drive size supported: Up to 2 TB

    User manual with memory upgrade instructions

     

    I'm sure my iMac is the underlined model above and it "up to 2TB"

     

    What do you think? If you thought 3TB is possible I would much prefer that to 2.

     

     

  • RRFS Level 5 Level 5 (4,490 points)

    NeddySeagoon wrote:

     

    RRFS wrote:

     

    Solid State Drives. They are both physically smaller and hold less data 60GB-560GB and they can get pricey but the read write speeds are 10 or more times faster. My unit runs much cooler than with the 500GB drive I had before and with 128GB for Applications and file swapping internally and 3TB for Storage Externally I'm a happy camper. I used a Crucial 128SSD and maxed my memory while I was at it. I'm keeping it for as long as they make software for it now.

     

     

    I did some quick googling RRFS.

     

    Thanks for the info, but I had better stick with HDD. I'd be much less confident trying to install it.

     

    Cheers though.

    Not to beat a dead horse here but the install difficulty would be the same or easier. It uses a SATA connector just like a HD and it doesn't have ANY exposed circuitry unlike internal drives that have that circuit board hanging off them.

    Also if you chose to you could get benefit from just running it as a Firewire boot drive and get marked improvement just using it as an external boot drive. I did for a week just to make sure I was ready with all the data/system transfers.

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,545 points)

    Yes, that means internal support is only up to 2 TBs. Info about SMS would be on the spec sheet for the drive. You can find those at the manufacturer's website.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    RRFS wrote:

     

    NeddySeagoon wrote:

     

    RRFS wrote:

     

    Solid State Drives. They are both physically smaller and hold less data 60GB-560GB and they can get pricey but the read write speeds are 10 or more times faster. My unit runs much cooler than with the 500GB drive I had before and with 128GB for Applications and file swapping internally and 3TB for Storage Externally I'm a happy camper. I used a Crucial 128SSD and maxed my memory while I was at it. I'm keeping it for as long as they make software for it now.

     

     

    I did some quick googling RRFS.

     

    Thanks for the info, but I had better stick with HDD. I'd be much less confident trying to install it.

     

    Cheers though.

    Not to beat a dead horse here but the install difficulty would be the same or easier. It uses a SATA connector just like a HD and it doesn't have ANY exposed circuitry unlike internal drives that have that circuit board hanging off them.

    Also if you chose to you could get benefit from just running it as a Firewire boot drive and get marked improvement just using it as an external boot drive. I did for a week just to make sure I was ready with all the data/system transfers.

     

     

    Sorry, I thought you said they were physically smaller than HDDs. That is what mainly put me off.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Kappy wrote:

     

    Yes, that means internal support is only up to 2 TBs. Info about SMS would be on the spec sheet for the drive. You can find those at the manufacturer's website.

     

    Thanks, Kappy.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Kappy? Hope your still there.

     

    I called the nearest Apple repair store (to see what brand they use) and the tech said he recommended a 500 GB drive but that it could take a 2 TB "if it was jumpered".

     

    I assume this is done in the same way as a PC and will be included in any instruction manual.

     

    Am I right?

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,750 points)

    I could be wrong, but if the maximum drive size for that model is 2TB, I don't understand what they're telling you. I've never heard of setting jumpers to allow a larger drive size, especially if the maximum allowed is already 2TB. A jumper is simply a short press-on connector or shunt that fits on the jumper block of the drive and enables the drive to make non-standard or just different internal connections.

     

    What I do know is  "jumpering" (it would be "jumpering down") involved in this situation usually refers to the data transfer speed the SATA controller in the Mac was designed for. It looks like your model is meant for a 1.5Gb/s drive -- those were the fastest at the time, I believe -- so perhaps a newer drive would have to be jumpered down to that transfer speed. I don't think you could get a 6Gb/s drive down that much, but a 3Gb/s drive -- there are still plenty of those around -- should be able to be moved down to 1.5Gb/s. And sometimes jumpering down is not even necessary. The article you linked states that SATA II drives (3.0Gb/s) are compatible.

     

    Then again, maybe this is something I just don't know about. Perhaps Kappy will be able to solve this.

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,750 points)

    Of course, you could just contact the drive manufacturer to see if this is necessary or even available as a feature.

  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (257,545 points)

    I'm afraid I don't understand that either, but then I've never seen a 2 TB drive. And, perhaps they were referring to a particular brand. Or it may be an issue related to using a drive capable of 6 Gb/s being used in a machine that only supports 3 Gb/s. I just don't know. I have no 6 Gb/s drives in my Mac Pro so I don't know if they would have required a jumper setting to use in a machine that only supports the slower interface.

  • NeddySeagoon Level 1 Level 1 (5 points)

    Hello again.

     

    The specs for the WD Caviar Black and the Seagate Barrcuda both state the hard drives 6 Gb/s & 3 Gb/s so I assume that means I can use it in my iMac with slower interface.

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,750 points)

    You should be able to use the Seagate 3 Gb/s out of the box, since your Mac is supposed to be 3 Gb/s compatible. If not, then jumpered down to 1.5 Gb/s. The WD 6 Gb/s drive may or may not work out of the box. If it is jumpered down to 3 Gb/s, pins 5 & 6, then it may be directly compatible. I don't know for sure.

     

    You should know that recent Seagate drives have  a poor reputation for quality.

     

    http://wdc.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/search/1/a_id/5387#jumper

     

    Before committing yourself to a drive, I would strongly recommend contacting the manufacturer.