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  • BarrettF77 Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)

    It's hard to quantify that answer. But they have posted on their site this is normal behavior, so I'd say nothing has changed.  But if they come out with a newer technology to use in displays, there is a chance this will no longer be an issue. 

     

    Apple is about margins, like any large company.  So, it's a gamble you'll have to weigh.  I'd return it if I had a LG or a dim or yellow Sammy.  But that's my stance.  Just have to find your comfort zone on acceptable risk.

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    How can they address an issue that's innate with the panel tech/type?

    The panel's better in some ways compared to other panel types, weaker in others, that's true for all panels types.

    The Sammy's have their characteristic strengths/weaknesses too, this is a concept that's hard for some to grasp.

  • BarrettF77 Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)

    I don't quantify advancement by one step forward and two steps back. 

     

    Apple machines back in the mid 2000's used to be fantastic in my experience.  Today, like many on this thread, we now have to go through a gamut of tests for pixels, light bleed, image retention, and so on.  The demographic of a MacBook Pro has been a pro user.  And as such, there are higher tolerances as to what is acceptable in the editing world. 

     

    A display that has a higher pixel density and slightly more vibrant display seems to be undermined when you see large defects that stick out as clearly as these do. 

  • brdeveloper Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I wonder if this uneven yellowing effect doesn't make IPS rMBP screen as poor as a TN screen. That is, we wanted get rid of TN displays because of color inaccuracies. Once we have some manifestation of color innacuracies on IPS ones, why should we pay a premium price for these screens? It seems that we would be better with a retina TN screen of the same type of the latest 15" classic MBP.

     

    Now I feel that I was better with that IR screen than the current unevenly yellow one. Don't know what to do... how long will it take until I get a decent display? Basically, we are paying for high pixel resolution, but in the color area, we are getting similar or worse results than if we had a TN screen...

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    BarrettF77 wrote:

     

    I don't quantify advancement by one step forward and two steps back.

     

    Apple machines back in the mid 2000's used to be fantastic in my experience.  Today, like many on this thread, we now have to go through a gamut of tests for pixels, light bleed, image retention, and so on.  The demographic of a MacBook Pro has been a pro user.  And as such, there are higher tolerances as to what is acceptable in the editing world. 

     

    A display that has a higher pixel density and slightly more vibrant display seems to be undermined when you see large defects that stick out as clearly as these do. 

     

    Shall I perpetutate your derailment by pointing out a bunch of threads about the top-end PC laptops that have display issues? And we're not likely to have anywhere near as many users, hence nowhere near as many complaints. But I'm confident I'll find a % that's pretty respresentive of the size of the user-base, & comparable to what we have going on here.

  • brdeveloper Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well, how can you say that non-uniform color shifts are normal to IPS displays if we had a lot of examples where this doesn't occur with the same brand and technology. I have a LG TV (IPS, non-led) connected to my MacMini which doesn't have this issue. I have a led IPS screen from LG at work which, again, doesn't have this problem. So, how can you say these defects are innate to IPS screens? It's bad display design at minimum but the most likely is bad quality control.

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    brdeveloper wrote:

     

    I have a LG TV (IPS, non-led) connected to my MacMini which doesn't have this issue. I have a IPS screen from LG at work which, again, doesn't have this problem.

     

    Are you claming that's a healthy sample upon which to draw conclusions?

    It's a well-known trait with that panel tech, before the advent of retina laptops, but, as with all panel tech there's yield variances.

    So, drawing from a tiny sample you could get a LG panel that exhibits almost zero IR problems, or has the worst form of it.

    Generally though, there seems to be a strong bias towards the latter, as that's a characteristic of the panel.

     

    To be clear here I'm talking about IR, not your issue, I've seen no evidence that yours is now the main trait for LG panels, yours seems more like an excption due to variances.

    OR, there may well be a completely diff. LG panel now being used, that has diff. strengths/weaknesses than the older (more IR prone) LG panels.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    brdeveloper wrote:

     

    but in the color area, we are getting similar or worse results than if we had a TN screen...

     

    Do you think that any of the 15" Retina MacBook Pro displays have neither image retention nor colour problems? Are there any good ones?

  • brdeveloper Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I'm not talking about statistics because a good QC should ensure a majority (near 100%) of well-made products. We shouldn't be talking about IR or yellowing if Apple (and Samsung, LG) had made their job. If a lot of Intel processors from some batch presented inaccuracies in results if you applied the assembly function MUL uninterruptedly for 5 minutes could we call this "characteristic of the processors"?

     

    IPS tech are well known for allowing wider viewing angles without color shifting. On a lot of rMBP displays, however, we get color shifting in ANY viewing angle. This can't be said normal functioning. It's at best usable, but we aren't getting the best of IPS technology with these retina displays.

  • BarrettF77 Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)

    It's possible there are some.  Usually apples first run products can be better than the norm as it's been discussed apples review units that get sent out in the same batches. 

     

    Jedhl, please stop responding to anything I say and I'll do the same as I cannot hide you from the feed. I have several opinions about you, but I'm going to keep those to myself.  I'd appreciate the same courtesy. I simply see your posts as pot stirring.  And I think others might as well. 

  • brdeveloper Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Good question. Maybe I should visit some local stores trying to find out if is there at least one good display. From my memories, my first IR'ed LG display was good in the color area, despite the image retention.

  • mac427 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So if I understand it correctly, the LG has IR issues and the Samsung has discoloration issues?  Forgive my ignorance, as I am new to all this and there are 600 + pages here....

  • BarrettF77 Level 1 Level 1 (45 points)

    LG has IR, yellowing, uneven lighting though the last two are less prevalent.  Samsung doesn't seem to have the IR, but is more likely to be yellow, uneven, or dim.  Hope that helps.

  • jedlh Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    brdeveloper wrote:

     

    I'm not talking about statistics because a good QC should ensure a majority (near 100%) of well-made products. We shouldn't be talking about IR or yellowing if Apple (and Samsung, LG) had made their job. If a lot of Intel processors from some batch presented inaccuracies in results if you applied the assembly function MUL uninterruptedly for 5 minutes could we call this "characteristic of the processors"?

    But you do get yield variances with processors, sometimes significant enough for different batches/models to be fashioned, it's exactly the same concept I'm talking about.

     

     

    On a lot of rMBP displays, however, we get color shifting in ANY viewing angle.

     

    "On a lot of LIPS displays, however, we get color shifting in ANY viewing angle."

    There, fixed that for you...

     

    Now, if you can fashion 4x large samples, 2x that includes top-end PC ultraportables using LG/SN panel tech, & 2x that includes 15"/13" rMPB's using the same, & from those 4x samples you can see a clear % diff. in display quality anomolies, I'm all ears.

  • brdeveloper Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I had a LG with image retention, now I have a LG display suffering for uneven yellowing (more noticeable on the half lower left). I didn't get a Samsung one yet, but if it had no IR and suffered from uniform yellowing, I'd be ok with that.