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  • lowmanb94 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well I spoke to a technichian this morning and have been informed that he cannot really do anything about my display. He said he recognized the problem immediately, but every replacement display he has recieved has had the yellow tint.

     

    In our converstaion he also mentioned that in the past year apple has become much more stict in the display replacement policy to begin with. He used to have near full discretion as to what qualified as a replacement, but now he must take pictures and wait for approval higher upstream. If this is not representative of 1) Apple's awareness of the problem and 2) innability -- or perhaps lack of desire --  to correct the root cause I dont know what is.

     

    I will see if I cant argue for a machine replacement when I go to pick up my computer this afternoon.  It really seems to be the only option. I am usually not the type to "complain" about such things, but I really feel let down by Apple. I purchased this machine on the basis of my experience toying around with display models -- all of which exhibited perfect displays. My current machine, which has been altered as a result of problems that were of no fault of mine, is now noticably inferior to the computer I agreed to buy.

     

    Perhaps I could let this go if I had bought a cheaper computer. But I didnt buy a cheaper computer.  I, a first time customer, (gladly) paid the "Apple Tax" for a superior customer experience -- to avoid a situation such as this.

     

    Have any of you had luck contacting any Apple employees higher up the food chain?

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    lowmanb94 wrote:

     

    Have any of you had luck contacting any Apple employees higher up the food chain?

     

    I got a call from Apple support in Texas last year and they wanted to "capture" my 2012 Retina MacBook Pro because of my complaning about the yellow display. I don't remember if it was because of my complaining on these forums or my prior call to Apple support about the yellow display. So I gave in my 2012 machine at a local Apple store and got a newer 2013 model. The new display is still yellow but a little less yellow. I called back to complain about this new yellow display and I was put on to a senior Apple support person but all he can tell me was to go in to local Apple store to show them the display. And having already complained at 3 different Genius Bars I know they're just going to tell me it's normal. So we're stuck with them. I don't know why this isn't bigger news. This new display is showing some strange image retention and pixel patterns so I'm going to try to get an exchange for that reason and probably end up with another yellowed display.

     

    If anyone has a yellowed display the only thing you can really do is go to System Preferences > Color > Calibrate > Export Mode (checked) > (leave the first 5 color sliders alone) > gamma use native (checked) > uncheck use native white point and play around with the slider until you find a less horrible apperance. Buying a color calibrator could help a little bit but make sure you buy one that allows you to calibrate higher than 6500 K. A color calibrator won't solve the problem but it does help a little with evening out the colors slightly.

     

    Here are my color calibrator profiles if anyone wants to try them. [ http://merchv.com/Apple/Merch-Colour-Profiles.zip ] Put them into ~/Library/ColorSync/Profiles

  • lowmanb94 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Well I though I would post a brief update.

     

    I decided to call up Apple Tech support and see what they could do. The person I spoke with on the phone referred me to his supervisor (still in Tech Support) and he agreed to grant a replacement screen the via a mail in service request.

     

    This new screen (an SJA2 -- same as my second replacement, and the display in which I first noticed yellow tinting) is still tinted, although not quite as badly as before. The difference is still very noticeable, and it looks quite bad next to the multiple "good" rMBP displays I encounter daily at work. Needless to say, I am not very satisfied.

     

    I think I will try and call up Customer Support and see what they can do for me. At this point, I have gone through three of the "replacement stock", and a machine replacement seems to be the only way to ensure a higher probability of a good display yield.

     

    I am highly doubtful, though, that they will grant my request. It is obvious to me that Apple still has some serious issues with its Retina Display supply chain, and to acknowledge that my display is bad is to acknowledge that a large portion of the replacement  displays (and even those on new machines) coming from their suppliers are not of the marketed quality.

     

    Why do this when they could just say that the displays are "within Apple specifications?" It seems to be working quite well for them so far. This thread has over one million views (and likely many thousands of unique posters), and I have yet to find any publicity on the issue past the initial screen retention issue.


    As a first time buyer, I took a huge chance purchasing such an expensive product.  And initially, I was extremely pleased with my investment. This whole fiasco, however, has made me take a complete 180 on the Apple brand.


    It unfortunate that they lost what was likely a life-long customer.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    lowmanb94 wrote:

     

    At this point, I have gone through three of the "replacement stock", and a machine replacement seems to be the only way to ensure a higher probability of a good display yield.

     

     

     

    I wonder if there's any difference in the displays they use on new machines and the displays they use as replacements. I used to think the yellowed displays were only given as replacements but I'm currently using a new machine with a yellowed display so I know new machines can have yellowed displays or even other colour variations like blotches or gradients.

  • wongshen1998 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I just bought my new Macbook Pro 13" late 2013

    Device ID :0x0a2e

    Revision ID :0x0009

    Can someone pls tell me if my screen model have any problem?

    And i have noticed that the Apple logo is kind of pinkish from the 1st day.

  • lowmanb94 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I don't think there is anything fundamentally different about these displays.

     

    My guess is that the quality control on displays that go into new machines is simply higher. With the pixel density and relative size of these panels, I would imagine the yield rate for "good" (however that is defined) displays is simply lower that of traditional LCD screens.

     

    So what does Apple do? Either they throw out more bad displays, or make their "Apple Specifications" just a little bit lower and deal with the potential backlash. It seems that someone crunched the numbers and figured that it would be cheaper to just handle "pickier" consumers than to toss a larger proportion of the displays.

  • lowmanb94 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    As a Hail Mary, I sent a letter off to Mr. Cook himself the other day. The odds are slim to none that I get a response, and even more slim that the man himself lays eyes on it.  It garnered the title "On the Dissolution of Brand Loyalty." Yes, I know that sounds ridiculous reading it back to myself now...


    Maybe posting it here will garner more attention and help all of us! Maybe... ¯\_( ツ)_/¯


    Anyone is welcome to use any of it as they wish.

     

    Mr. Cook (or to whomever this meets),

     

    I purchased my first Apple product around two years ago. Admittedly, I was skeptical that the premium price of my new 15” Retina Macbook Pro was warranted. One can attain a functioning computer for much less, after all.

     

    As I actually began to use the machine, my skepticism was immediately disbanded. My Macbook quickly established itself as the best computer I had ever owned.  The stellar in-store experience, powerful unix-underpinned operating system, and overall attention to design was refreshing coming from a Windows world.

     

    Now I am not one to get emotional about such things, but I felt good about the Apple brand. In fact, I genuinely believed that Apple would be the sole provider my of computing needs for some time to come.

     

    After owning the machine for several months, a large cluster of dead pixels appeared in center of the display. A local certified technician acknowledged the problem immediately, said he could replace the display in two days, and — best of all — informed me that it was completely covered by Apple Care.

     

    Sure enough, I had a shiny, half-new computer back into my hands in almost no time at all. I was extremely impressed by this experience. There were no visible scars left from the repair, and the work was completed so quickly I didn’t miss any schoolwork.  In addition, my charging brick was replaced when I mentioned that it had started to fray. I couldn’t have dreamed of such great customer service.

     

    Fast forward more than a year of happy ownership. I decided to take my machine to a (different) technician to tighten up the loosening display hinges; the computer was otherwise functioning perfectly. Surprisingly, I was informed that the entire clamshell assembly needed to be replaced a second time.  Again, my machine was returned to me very quickly, and my experience with the technicians was fantastic.

     

    When I opened the machine up, however, I noticed that display had a very noticeable yellow tint. At first, I dismissed this annoyance as a natural variation caused by the current state of LCD manufacturing technology. Everyone can't expect an absolutely perfect yield, after all.

     

    The issue kept nagging me, so I took the machine to my summer workplace to compare with other 2012 and 2013 Retina Macbook Pros. Side by side, the difference in tint was garish. The distinction was so great, in fact, that I could no longer accept the issue as a natural variation. In addition, the difference could not be rectified as two ends on some spectrum of personal preference (be it "warm" or “cool”). The color reproduction on my display — no matter the calibration effort — was just not at good.

     

    I concluded that I had received a fluke, and called Apple Tech Support to speak to someone about it. Again, I was treated exceptionally well on the phone, and in about about a week’s time my Macbook had received its third clamshell display via a mail-in repair request.

     

    To my repeated dismay, this third (and current) display also exhibited the same yellow tint.  As the odds of receiving two “flukes” in any large scale manufacturing process are small, I took the internet in search of others who had experienced a similar issue.

     

    I was shocked by the amount of customers who had screens that looked the same as mine. This Apple Support Community thread, in particular, has nearly 1.4 million views and approximately 10,000 posts (several thousand are likely unique).  Inside, individuals have reported image retention and yellow tint issues. The lack of quality control is so great that the process of swapping machines/displays in hopes to get a good one has been comically dubbed the “Display Lottery.”  Even now, almost two years since the launch of the “retina" Macbook Pros, the issue still persists.

     

    Superficially, I am frustrated because this yellow tinted display is not the display that I agreed to purchase on the display floor two years ago. The near perfect displays on the floor models, after all, were the main reason I purchased the machine over cheaper, non Apple options. In addition, the retina display is the focal point of Apple’s advertising campaign for the machine. From the product page:

     

    The Retina display reduces glare while maintaining incredible color and quality. Its high contrast ratio results in blacker blacks and whiter whites. And everything in between is rich and vibrant. IPS technology gives you a wide, 178-degree view of everything on the screen, so you’ll see the difference at practically any angle. And you’re going to love what you see.

     

    I understand that somewhat-hyperbolic, nebulous language is the nature of advertising, but I would expect to at least be happy with a display that is described in that manner. And I don’t think that expectation is unfair.

     

    On a more personal level, I feel betrayed by the company. It is ludicrous to suggest that leadership isn't aware of these quality control issues. Apple, after all, has the market presence to hire only best and brightest in the industry to manage such things. Yet, as of the time of this writing,  there has been no official statement from the company acknowledging anything.  I could even be sympathetic to such manufacturing struggles were they admitted — the pixel density and relatively large size of these displays is most certainly pushing the current boundaries of LCD technology.  My main issue is that these problems, it seems to me, are being hidden under that guise that all panels pass “Apple Specifications.”

     

    There is a clear discrepancy between he marketed and actual quality of a significant portion of these displays, and it seems that complaints have thus far been met with hand-waiving and denial.  I could continue to swap displays like others have done, but I simply don’t have the time to commit to ongoing repair requests. And more importantly, I shouldn’t even have to.

     

    Perhaps the company might be able to do something for me, perhaps not. I still have some faith left in the industry-leading customer service that Apple provides. The principal purpose of this letter, however,  is to better illuminate the frustration of other consumers in a similar situation as myself. I am certain that this issue will contract your customer base. Whether or not that contraction is significant enough to address is up to you.

     

    No, it probably won’t affect the bottom line. But it does, to me and many others, erode the excellent reputation that Apple possess as the most valuable company in the world.

     

    Regards,

    Ben

     

     

     

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    lowmanb94 wrote:

     

    Maybe posting it here will garner more attention and help all of us! Maybe... ¯\_( ツ)_/¯

     

     

     

     

     

    Good letter. I don't understand how this isn't bigger news. People complain about Apple for the strangest things, but genuine problems like horrible-looking displays on ridiculously expensive computers goes unreported. Unfortunately Apple's indifference about colour accuracy isn't limited to their computers; the iPhones and iPads can have colour variation like yellow/green tints or displays that turn pink in direct sunlight.

  • CT Level 6 Level 6 (16,425 points)

    Still. Can't. Confirm.

  • BivvyGuy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Does anyone know whether or not certain screen sizes are affected more or less with this issue?

    I'm considering getting a 13 inch MBP (my first mac) due to issues with terrible service from Sony on the Vaio range. Don't particularly want to endure something similar at a higher cost with apple though!

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    BivvyGuy wrote:

     

    Does anyone know whether or not certain screen sizes are affected more or less with this issue?

    I'm considering getting a 13 inch MBP (my first mac) due to issues with terrible service from Sony on the Vaio range. Don't particularly want to endure something similar at a higher cost with apple though!

     

    If the question pertains to the yellow tint issue on 13-inch Retina MacBook Pros then I present the following photograph. The machine on the right is a 13" non-Retina MacBook Pro; you can tell that based on the "MacBook Pro" logo on the bezel and the absence of speakers on the side of the keyboard. The machine on the left is a 13" Retina MacBook Pro; you can tell that based on the absence of "MacBook Pro" on the bezel. You can judge for yourself if the colour is different; I think it is, but possibly not as severe as other units. If the question was about image retention, then, I think I have heard from users on here or MacRumors about image retention on the 13" Retina MacBook Pro, so yes to that too. Notice the pink Apple logos in the shot.

     

     

    IMG_2500-90.jpg

  • threehundredpandas Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    631 pages of replies and 1.3 Million views, and Apple refuses to admit there is a problem. My mid 2012 MacBook Pro has the Samsung display with the ghosting problem. It's a really beautiful machine otherwise, which is unfortunately let down by a totally rubbish display.

     

    Graphics applications like Photoshop and Illustrator are unusable, the rest of the time it's annoying to say the least. As much as I dislike Windows, I have resorted to using my Dell XPS laptop for graphics work and use my MacBook solely for programming (I'm an iOS dev). The display on the Dell is equivalent to the MacBook retina, and the machine cost half the price for exactly the same specs.

     

    Even if Apple did an about-face and recalled the products, or at least subsidised repairs, there is still no hope. Apple is seriously mis-represented here in South Africa. All Apple products are sold through an authorised reseller Core Group, with the result that everything costs twice as much as the dollar price in the US and the customers are treated like worthless chaff. Once you buy an Apple product here you're stuck with it as is for good.

     

    You need to have a deep burning need to own an Apple product if you live here, and at the moment with the prices and the sub-standard quality I'm feeling like it's just not worth the risk.

  • joncrooshal Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I just got my 15" rMBP back. Had the ghosting issue from the old LG display (mid 2012). While I was ****** in the first place that it had burn-in, Apple swapped in a new screen with no real questions asked.

     

    Currently have the new LG screen.

     

    Was surprised it was an easy swap after reading some of the horror stories dealing with this.

  • Merch Visoiu Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    joncrooshal wrote:

     

    I just got my 15" rMBP back. Had the ghosting issue from the old LG display (mid 2012). While I was ****** in the first place that it had burn-in, Apple swapped in a new screen with no real questions asked.

     

    Currently have the new LG screen.

     

    Was surprised it was an easy swap after reading some of the horror stories dealing with this.

     

    And how's the colour on your replacement display? Is the colour and contrast the same as on the old one?

  • joncrooshal Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I haven't noticed any real difference.

     

    Thank God the ghosting is gone, though.