11 Replies Latest reply: Aug 19, 2012 2:00 PM by baltwo
NCP10 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Kinda new to my MBP w/ Lion installed.  I'm wondering if there is a setting one can chose to completely close an application when the red dot is clicked.  Right now they are still appearing to be loaded into memroy (guessing that is what is happening as the Dock shows a little white dot by the app's icon, and so you have to rt click it and choose quit. 

 

Also, what's the easiest ways to do screen prints, which I so often in the Windows world w/ the print screen key on the Win keyboard.  I really miss the print screen and HOME/END buttons on the Windows keyboard design.  Perhaps they are on larger MBP's as mine's a 13".

 

Thank you kindly in advance,

 

Noel


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.4)
  • Kappy Level 10 Level 10 (251,085 points)

    The "red dot" only closes the window. To actually quit an application you can:

     

    1. Choose Quit from the application's name menu.
    2. If the application is frontmost, press COMMAND-Q.
    3. You can CTRL- or RIGHT-click on the application's Dock icon and select Quit from the context menu.
  • CT Level 6 Level 6 (16,645 points)

    For most applications, the red dot is intended to close a window only.  That's just the way it is.

     

    Here is a whole bunch of stuff that compares MacOS with Windows: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT2514

     

    Screenshots (from Mac OS Help):

     

    ActionShortcut

    Take a picture of the whole screen

    Command (⌘)-Shift-3

    Take a picture of part of the screen

    Command (⌘)-Shift-4, and then drag the crosshair pointer to select the area. Continue to press the mouse button, release the keys, and then press Shift, Option, or the Space bar while you drag to resize the selection area. When you are ready to take a picture, release the mouse button.

    To cancel, press Escape.

    Take a picture of a window or the menu bar

    Command (⌘)-Shift-4, press the Space Bar, move the camera pointer over the area to highlight it, and then click.

    To cancel, press Escape.

    Take a picture of a menu, including the title

    Click the menu to display the menu commands, press Command (⌘)-Shift-4, and drag the crosshair pointer over the area.

    To cancel, press Escape.

    Take a picture of the menu without its title

    Click the menu to display the menu commands, press Command (⌘)-Shift-4, press the Space Bar, move the camera pointer over the menu to highlight it, and then click.

    To cancel, press Escape.

     

    On MBP:

     

    Home = fn-left arrow, End = fn-right arrow

     

     

    -charlie

  • db24401 Level 3 Level 3 (680 points)

    here is a link to some more keyboard shortcuts --

     

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1343?viewlocale=en_US

  • NCP10 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Take a picture of part of the screen

    Command (⌘)-Shift-4, and then drag the crosshair pointer to select the area. Continue to press the mouse button, release the keys, and then press Shift, Option, or the Space bar while you drag to resize the selection area. When you are ready to take a picture, release the mouse button.

    To cancel, press Escape.

    Wow, not a very user friendly method!  There are a few weird things w/ this OS over Windows, but overall I'm fairly happy w/ OSX Lion.  In looking at the list of keyboard shortcuts, it appears there's lots one can learn.  As a more casual user of OSX I'm less inclined to dig in deep--even so it's great to have the potential to use many keyboard shortcuts if so desired.

  • gumsie Level 4 Level 4 (2,150 points)

    Very user friendly, just badly explained I think.

    I also think the resulting output is much easier to deal with than the Windows way, (unless they've changed it). Here's a better explanation; If you have a trackpad, (magic or built in), it'd be demonstrated much more easily if you enable draglock, (System Preferences>Universal Access>Mouse & Trackpad>Trackpad Options>Dragging - With Drag Lock), as per the below image.

    Screen Shot 2012-07-05 at 04.35.14.png

    Now, assuming you know how drag lock works, press ⌘↑4 for the crosshairs. Tap and then quickly tap and hold and drag out a small rectangle, the cursor should now remian on screen whilst you remove your hand from the trackpad.

    Now press;

    1. Shift, and move the crosshairs around. You may notice it locks either the height or width of the rectangle you dragged, (depending on which direction you move the mouse next).

    2. Option, this one, I haven't figured out how to describe easily, give it a go.

    3. Space, and move the crosshairs around. You may notice it locks the size of the rectangle you dragged out and enables it to be moved to different areas.

     

    Usually the image appears as a .png file on your desktop but this format and save location can be changed.

  • Badunit Level 6 Level 6 (11,400 points)

    If I recall, all you really have to do for a screenshot of part of the screen is cmd-shift-4 then drag a box to capture what you want.  The other stuff is only for if you did not draw the box correctly.

  • NCP10 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you all for the rapid replies.  I think since I have so much experience in the Win world and because many things are similar, it's easy to avoid digging in deeper to OSX use.   To become a very skilled OSX user I think will take some time.  Since I don't really 'work' in OSX there is also less incentive to add skills.  I did install Office for Mac 2011 and it functions quite well except a few VBA commands don't appear to work as they do in MS Office on a Win platform.

     

    Again, thank you all ;o)

     

    Noel

  • NCP10 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    That's really the simple way indeed.  Thanks for that! 

  • mkwilkes Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The odd thing is that some Mac apps actually do quit when the red dot is clicked. iPhoto '11 (vs. 9.2.3) and calculator vs. 4.5.3 are two examples. I use Windows at work and not being able to quit apps with one click is a feature I miss on the Mac.

  • baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (61,945 points)

    mkwilkes wrote:

    The odd thing is that some Mac apps actually do quit when the red dot is clicked. iPhoto '11 (vs. 9.2.3) and calculator vs. 4.5.3 are two examples. I use Windows at work and not being able to quit apps with one click is a feature I miss on the Mac.

    Only apps that don't create separate document windows, such as System Preferences and Disk Utility quit when clicking on the red dot. All others just close that window.

  • baltwo Level 9 Level 9 (61,945 points)

    NCP10 wrote:

    …since I have so much experience in the Win world and because many things are similar, it's easy to avoid digging in deeper to OSX use.   To become a very skilled OSX user I think will take some time.

    To get started with honing your skills, see these:

     

    Switching from Windows to Mac OS X,
    Basic Tutorials on using a Mac,
    Mac 101: Mac Essentials,
    Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts,
    Anatomy of a Mac,
    MacTips,
    Switching to Mac Superguide, and
    Switching to the Mac: The Missing Manual, Lion Edition.

     

    Additionally, *Texas Mac Man* recommends:

     

    Quick Assist,
    Welcome to the Switch To A Mac Guides,
    Take Control E-books, and
    A guide for switching to a Mac