3 Replies Latest reply: Aug 27, 2012 8:21 AM by bartzumbari
freediverx01 Level 1 Level 1 (55 points)

Are there any restrictions to toggling FileVault 2 encryption on or off - such as having a certain amount of free disk space available?

 

I've learned the hard way, from using Apple encryption options in the past, that many of these services come with serious limitations and requirements which only become obvious after one has committed to the process, which is often irreversible. Can anyone point me to an authoritative evaluation of FileVault 2 describing any caveats or downsides to using it?

 

Also, if you using FileVault 2, are there any impacts to the ability to use Time Machine, and are Time Machine backups also encryptable and secure?


iMac (27-inch Late 2009), Mac OS X (10.7.4)
  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,435 points)

    Are there any restrictions to toggling FileVault 2 encryption on or off - such as having a certain amount of free disk space available?

     

    No.

     

    Can anyone point me to an authoritative evaluation of FileVault 2 describing any caveats or downsides to using it?

     

    No, but these are the limitations I know of: You can't boot in safe mode, activate the Guest account, log in automatically, or verify the current boot volume in Disk Utility.

     

    Also, if you using FileVault 2, are there any impacts to the ability to use Time Machine, and are Time Machine backups also encryptable and secure?

     

    It works transparently with Time Machine. Backups are not encrypted unless you specify encryption when you set up a TM backup.

  • Sherman Wilcox Level 1 Level 1 (100 points)

    No, but these are the limitations I know of: You can't boot in safe mode, activate the Guest account, log in automatically, or verify the current boot volume in Disk Utility.

     

    I'm trying to understand FV 2 before turning it on (in preparation for an overseas trip). Is it true that if I want to verify or repair the current boot volume, I can log into my Recovery partition with Cmd-R and run Disk Utility from there? Or is there no way to repair with Disk Utility once FV 2 is turned on?

     

    Thanks.

  • bartzumbari Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I'm using FV 2 and Disk Utility just told me I need to boot from the recovery partition to repair the boot disk.  I booted holding cmd-R and launched Disk Utility and the boot disk is greyed out--I assume due it not being able to access a disk with FV 2 enabled.  I'm currently un-encrypting by boot disk so I can repair it, which is a very long process (at least with my slow 5400 rpm boot disk.) 

     

    So it appears the answer to your question is, NO, if you have FV 2 turned on and you boot with Cmd-R and run Disk Utility, you will not be able to repair the encrypted disk.