8 Replies Latest reply: Jul 20, 2012 1:43 PM by Limnos
masllorens Level 1 Level 1

Hi,

I'm trying to upgrade system for a powerbook G4. I've got the Mac os x 10.4.11. Is this as far as I can go? or is Leopard supported in non-intel computers?

Also... if it's possible to upgrade... where can I find a download? Thanks, Eugenia


PowerBook, Mac OS X (10.4.11)
  • Limnos Level 9 Level 9

    With a G4 Leopard is it, assuming your computer even meets Leopard's system requirements:

     

    Leopard 10.5 Technical Requirements - http://support.apple.com/kb/SP517

     

    Get more information about your computer. Go to the Apple in the upper left corner of any window, then "About This Mac", then "More Info..."  Copy and paste the information here, but omit the serial number and Hardware UUID (if present).

     

    Also of interest:

     

    List of Applications Not Compatible with Leopard - http://guides.macrumors.com/List:Applications_Not_Compatible_with_Leopard

     

    Leopard is not easy to find, nor cheap.

     

    Texas Mac Man, Leopard disc sources - https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3636662

     

    "a brody" post about upgrading to Leopard - https://discussions.apple.com/thread/3373795

     

    After all this if you are anticipating having to spend several hundred dollars to upgrade you might just consider jumping to a used Intel machine where you can get Snow Leopard for $29 if it doesn't already come with it.

  • Neville Hillyer Level 4 Level 4

    Before the install

    Ensure your data (at least all Home folders) is backed up before you install. Hard disks can fail at any time so it is important to regularly backup to an external disk with Time Machine or a third party alternative. Inexperienced users should follow Apple's install advice but experienced users may prefer to do a clean install.

     

    OS numbers and names

    OS X 10.4.x - Tiger

    OS X 10.5.x - Leopard

    OS X 10.6.x - Snow Leopard

    OS X 10.7.x - Lion

    OS X 10.8.x - Mountain Lion

     

    More about Macs

    The Apple History site has specifications for every Mac ever produced: http://www.apple-history.com

     

    Upgrade to Leopard

    Those wishing to upgrade to Leopard should be aware that install disks can be expensive unless you contact Apple. Details: http://lowendmac.com/deals/best-os-x-leopard-prices.html Standard Leopard installers impose several hardware limitations including speed and RAM size but all these restrictions can be overcome. Google for details. Leopard works well at 500 MHz with 1 GB of RAM and many happy users have less than this.

     

    Upgrade beyond Leopard

    OSs beyond OS X 10.5.8 require an Intel processor. If in doubt check this: Click the apple at the top left of your screen and select 'About this Mac'. This will give you your OS number. Then click 'More Info' to see which processor you have. If it says PowerPC you cannot upgrade to Snow Leopard and above. If you have an Intel Mac it is well worth upgrading to Snow Leopard now and then considering other options after that. You can buy Snow Leopard here: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MC573Z/A

     

    Upgrade beyond Snow Leopard

    Information about upgrading Snow Leopard to Lion or Mountain Lion: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MD256Z/A

     

    Important

    Check that your Mac complies with any requirements. If you are not in the US you should use the Change Country link at the bottom of Apple pages.

  • Limnos Level 9 Level 9

    Neville Hillyer wrote:

    Those wishing to upgrade to Leopard should be aware that install disks can be expensive unless you contact Apple.

    But Apple doesn't  stock retail Leopard any longer.  I don't think you can even talk them out of a copy the way you could a few years back.  The only sources are third party and yes, they will charge what the market will bear.

     

    Important

    Check that your Mac complies with any requirements. If you are not in the US you should use the Change Country link at the bottom of Apple pages.

    If you're talking abut system requirements, yes.  However, hardware requirements are going to be the same anywhere.

  • Neville Hillyer Level 4 Level 4

    My understanding was that Apple will still supply a copy of an original lost disk for a nominal fee after checking the Mac's serial number. I assume these disks may be model specific although other sites imply they may not be - perhaps my wording on this point needs to be more circumspect.

     

    Apple always used to keep a stock of non-model specific disks for volume license holders who were promised further disks for a nominal handling fee. For an example a public body may have Leopard limited Macs and wish to supplement their 1,000 off license originally delivered with one disk. I don't recall Apple ever saying there was a time limit on this service.

     

    The 'important' notes were intended to be separate issues - I will change this.

     

    Revised version below:

     

     

    Before the install

    Ensure your data (at least all Home folders) is backed up before you install. Hard disks can fail at any time so it is important to regularly backup to an external disk with Time Machine or a third party alternative. Inexperienced users should follow Apple's install advice but experienced users may prefer to do a clean install.

     

    OS numbers and names

    OS X 10.4.x - Tiger

    OS X 10.5.x - Leopard

    OS X 10.6.x - Snow Leopard

    OS X 10.7.x - Lion

    OS X 10.8.x - Mountain Lion

     

    More about Macs

    The Apple History site has specifications for every Mac ever produced: http://www.apple-history.com

     

    Upgrade to Leopard

    Those wishing to upgrade to Leopard should be aware that install disks can be expensive. Details: http://lowendmac.com/deals/best-os-x-leopard-prices.html Standard Leopard installers impose several hardware limitations including speed and RAM size but all these restrictions can be overcome. Google for details. Leopard works well at 500 MHz with 1 GB of RAM and many happy users have less than this.

     

    Upgrade beyond Leopard

    OSs beyond OS X 10.5.8 require an Intel processor. If in doubt click the apple at the top left of your screen and select 'About this Mac'. This will give you your OS number. Then click 'More Info' to see which processor you have. If it says PowerPC you cannot upgrade to Snow Leopard and above. If you have an Intel Mac it is well worth upgrading to Snow Leopard now and then considering other options after that. You can buy Snow Leopard here: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MC573Z/A

     

    Upgrade beyond Snow Leopard

    Information about upgrading Snow Leopard to Lion or Mountain Lion: http://store.apple.com/us/product/MD256Z/A

     

    Important

    1. Check that your Mac complies with any requirements.
    2. If you are not in the US you should use the Change Country link at the bottom of Apple pages.
  • Limnos Level 9 Level 9

    Yes, they do keep a limited backstock of model specific discs.  Apple does consider anything older than 5 years as vintage and has discontinued any hardware support which could likely include accompanying installer discs unless they find a dusty set in the bottom of a drawer.

     

      Vintage and obsolete products - http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1752

     

    The big "however" in all this is the original post was about upgrading a G4 to Leopard, and one which required a retail Leopard discs.  When Snow Leopard first came out Apple stopped selling Tiger.  Still, you could still go to Apple and cry on their shoulder that you had a G4 that wasn't rated for Leopard and could they pretty please find you a set of retail Tiger discs for sale.  That lasted a bit, then people started reporting back they couldn't find Tiger at Apple for neither love nor money.   I can't speak for Apple but given that even Snow Leopard is but hours away from becoming third generation, I very much doubt they still have any retail copies of a system they stopped selling in the stores 3 years ago, especially one that was so heavily in demand.  I read reports by posters of seeing Leopard selling for $150+ which suggests to me there isn't an old Apple retail price source left around.

  • Texas Mac Man Level 8 Level 8

    Leopard is no longer available at the Apple Store but may be available by calling Apple Phone Sales @ 1-800-MY-APPLE (1-800-692-7753).

     

    If you can't obtain a retail install DVD from Apple, look on eBay or Google the installer part numbers to possibly find at an on-line store. Here's what to look for:

     

    MB427Z/A  Leopard 10.5.1 install DVD

    MB576Z/A  Leopard 10.5.4 install DVD

    MB021Z/A  Leopard 10.5.6 install DVD (single user)

    MB022Z/A  Leopard 10.5.6 install DVD (5-user family pack)

     

    Installing Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard

    http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1544

     

    Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard Installation and Setup Guide

    http://manuals.info.apple.com/en/leopard_install-setup.pdf

     

    After you install the base 10.5, download & install the 10.5.8 combo update at http://support.apple.com/downloads/Mac_OS_X_10_5_8_Combo_Update

     

    The DVD should look like this

    leopard.jpg

    Caution - Leopard does not support classic mode. So, if you currently open OS 9 apps in classic mode, you won't be able to do this if you upgrade to Leopard.

     

     Cheers, Tom

  • Neville Hillyer Level 4 Level 4

    Leopard does not support classic mode. So, if you currently open OS 9 apps in classic mode, you won't be able to do this if you upgrade to Leopard.

     

    My Leopard supports booting into OS 9.2.2 in many locations including the same partition as Leopard. My OS 9 supports booting into Leopard but it ignores all OS X security. Selecting OS via option at boot requires separate partitions.

  • Limnos Level 9 Level 9

    "Classic" isn't the same as native booting to OS9.  You are right about the G4 likely booting natively to OS9, TMM is right about OS9 as Classic not being available in Leopard.