8 Replies Latest reply: Sep 25, 2012 11:37 AM by MarkRHolbrook
rauln08 Level 1 Level 1

i study at college and i have a mac book pro... happens to be that at certain classes, teachers ask me to use programs that only runs on windows.. if i install windows on the drive of my lap, will i lose the guaranty? i bought my laptop on april?


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.4)
  • shldr2thewheel Level 7 Level 7

    you are allowed to install Windows: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1461

  • MarkRHolbrook Level 1 Level 1

    Purchase either VMWare Fusion or Parallels.

     

    these are programs that install on Mac OSX and allow you to setup Windows as a virtual machine.  This means your Mac OSX is still intact.  You run Windows ONLY when you want to or need to and you can switch between Mac OS X and windows with a click of the mouse.  Both are active at the same time.

     

    You will need a licensed copy of windows to install.

     

    I use these everyday for work.  They work just fine.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7

    if i install windows on the drive of my lap, will i lose the guaranty?

     

    No,

     

    Apple provides a driect install method to run Windows 7 on a Mac by sectioning the boot drive and providing hardware drivers called BootCamp.

     

    However if you Windows programs are not too demanding, then you may want to consider running Windows in OS X vai virtual machine software instead, as BootCamp can be dangerous problem when you get Windows malware.

     

    With virtual machine software, you can revert to a earlier snapshot, the malware is gone.

     

    See the pro's and cons of each and what's avaialble here

     

    Windows in BootCamp or Virtual Machine?

  • MarkRHolbrook Level 1 Level 1

    ds store,

     

    Excellent overview of Bootcamp versus Virtual Machine.

     

    If I could add a comment I would.  The comment is something you do cover kind of in your tip:

     

    As you mention if you use Bootcamp then you have to use something like WinClone to get a backup of your windows install.

     

    It is possible for VMWare to store its "virtual machine" in a bootcamp partition. I've never done it but this has allowed some people to use their "bootcamp partition" both ways.  IE directly by booting into Windows as you mention or through VMWare as a virtual machine.

     

    Still this is not a great idea in my opinion because of the issues Windows has with malware and many other things.  I'm a medical device programmer by trade.  Most of my software runs under windows as it is the os of choice for most companies now days.

     

    Over the years I've owned some 5 different windows laptops.  Each has gone through a life cycle as follows:

     

      new (flashy, speedy), functional (compilers installed), doggy and buggy (as updates were installed things started to conflict), death (need to reload Windows fresh)

     

    In the new phase everything is fast and works but nothing is loaded.

     

    In the functional stage you are stable and your stuff runs.  If you could stay right here then it would be a good laptop for a long time.  But most of us need to install updates and windows fixes.

     

    In the doggy and buggy stage either you have conflicting things loaded, bad drivers have been installed or whatever but your laptop begins to blue-screen and some programs just take forever to load and run.  Optimizing the disk helps but it doesn't fix the conflicts.  If you get malware things can go bad real fast.  You can limp along in this state but you won't enjoy your machine and you'll be frustrated often.

     

    In the death stage things have gotten so bad you need to reload windows and start all over again which is time consuming.

     

    When Apple switched to Intel and virtual machines started to really heat up I dove in and gave it a try.  I will NEVER go back to a "real" windows machine again.   With VMs I can copy, clone, revert and do whatever I want and I always have the ability recover to some known good state.

     

    My mode of operation with VMs is as follows:

     

    Need to install some new update or some new program?  First make a copy of the VM or take a snapshot. 

    Restart the VM fresh.

    Install the update or new software.

    Validate functionality over a few days or a week or two.

    If there are problems, revert back.

     

    I could never do this easily with Windows laptops because the cloning took forever and was difficult to run.  I do all of the above while still working in Mac OS.

     

    So for me VM's are the way to go.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7

    MarkRHolbrook wrote:

     

    ds store,

     

    It is possible for VMWare to store its "virtual machine" in a bootcamp partition?

     

     

    I haven't tried saving the virtual machine file(s) in a Windows BootCamp partition.

     

    I would have to install NTFS reading software in OS X to read/write the native file format of the BootCamp partition.

     

    I'm assuming that there would be a performance problem.

     

    I've never done it but this has allowed some people to use their "bootcamp partition" both ways.  IE directly by booting into Windows as you mention or through VMWare as a virtual machine.

     

    Well if one boots into Windows in Bootcamp, thats a direct boot, then they would have to launch virtual machine software to run the virtual machine Windows version (of OS X) in Windows.

     

    Another method would be to keep the vm-ed Windows in OS X, thus no problematic NTFS software needed and only boot BootCamp Windows for performance related programs, not for Internet surfing, email or transfering files where malware comes from, leave that for the vm-ed Windows.

     

     

    I could never do this easily with Windows laptops because the cloning took forever and was difficult to run. 

     

    I don't know about Winclone if it just updates the clone or makes a whole new one.

     

    But I have about a half dozen vm-ed OS's from XP, Vista and Win 7, 8 beta, to Linux flavors, all in OS X and I clone the whole shebang with Carbon Copy Cloner to a another bootable partition occassionally and/or a couple of external drives.

     

    CCC can update the clones, which takes less time than Disk Utility full clone method, also since I don't update the external clones all that often so I can revert back a few months ago if needed, I tend to let these update overnight.

     

    I totally abhor TimeMachine, I think it's more Apple gimmicky crap / data trap. However it's better than nothing for the newbies.

  • MarkRHolbrook Level 1 Level 1

    Heh... I think you misunderstood...

     

    I've never done this but I have a buddy that has Windows7 installed in bootcamp.  So as you mention he can boot directly into Windows into the bootcamp partition.

     

    He was also successful at installing VMWare Fusion and creating a VM that "pointed" at the bootcamp partition.  Again I've never tried this but he showed me his machine both booted into bootcamp using Windows 7 and running VMWare Fusion VM looking at the same bootcamp partition.

     

    For him its the best of both worlds.  For normal day to day use he uses VMWare to access the bootcamp partition through a VMWare VM that uses the bootcamp partition as its disk.

     

    For gaming me boots directly into the Windows loaded in bootcamp.

     

    I don't game on my laptop so the VMWare solution using VM files is far better because I can copy/clone/snapshot them all over the place.  I can even move my VMs to another Mac and run them there.  I've even had success at moving my VMWare Fusion VMs to a windows machine running VMWare Workstation and having them function just fine in that environment.

     

    VMs are the way to go.

  • ds store Level 7 Level 7

    MarkRHolbrook wrote:

     

    ...he showed me his machine both booted into bootcamp using Windows 7 and running VMWare Fusion VM looking at the same bootcamp partition.

     

    It's looking at a copy of it, not the original.

     

    Vm software can copy the Bootcamp partition to use in OS X for instance.

     

    Likely what he did was transfer that to Bootcamp and opened it with a Windows version of Vmware.

     

     

    If he needed to direct boot into Bootcamp for performance reasons often and used vm-ed Windows for risky stuff, but also to access in OS X, then I can see him doing that.

     

    Running Windows in Windows is a performance hit, but usually the risky programs (email, web surfing etc) are not performance requiring anyway.

  • MarkRHolbrook Level 1 Level 1

    Like I said, not something I would do.  But no... it was NOT looking at a copy of it.  During his demonstration we installed when booted into Bootcamp Windows7 a copy of a Delphi compiler he'd purchased.  After the install was complete we shutdown windows, rebooted into MacOS.

     

    He started up VMWare and opened his "VM" that points to the bootcamp partition and there was the Delphi compiler we'd just installed.  He ran it to make sure it ran.  It was truly VMWare Fusion that he ran.  I watched him run it in Mac OSX, load his VM and start it.

     

    So no... it was not a copy.  It was truly pointing at the same partition on the drive.  I am not sure having never tried this and never will how he accomplished this but it did work and he was quite pleased with it.

     

    Again... I have zero need for this.  To me it is risky as heck because if during gaming he gets malware on that BC partition then his VM is corrupt as well.

     

    But it can be done.