1 2 Previous Next 23 Replies Latest reply: Oct 18, 2012 12:50 PM by Kurt Lang
dmingo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

What is the most reliable Wireless router for Mountain Lion? I've now been struggling with several routers and returning them to the store because they either don't support ML or they persistenly and regularly lose the wireless signal.

 

Goin batty!


iMac, Mac OS X (10.7.4), 27" 3.4 GHz i7, 16 GB 1067 DDR3
  • 1. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    Luis Sequeira1 Level 5 Level 5 (5,580 points)

    There is nothing specific about ML there. They should all work if properly configured.

  • 2. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (27,925 points)

    That's odd, I've never run into a wireless router I couldn't connect to. That doesn't mean that they don't exist - I know that some older routers don't properly support modern wifi standards - but I'm surprised that you would find multiple modern routers that wouldn't work. I wonder if it isn't a configuration issue.

     

    Although you'll pay more for it, I like the Apple AirPort Extreme routers. They're quite easy to configure and provide full support for all the wireless features of your other Apple hardware, and work well with Windows machines as well.

  • 3. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    dmingo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I've been at this Mac thing from the beginning and I learn something new each day- I also realize that I still get stumped. My AirPort/Time Machine fried after 4 years and I tried replacing it with a larger backup drive (works fine) and a router (NetGear and linksys models). The NetGear set up easy enough and serviced up to seven devices, but at least once a day, it had to be restarted to be seen. Even then, the Internet connection was not always there. My last straw was to return to BestBuy for the fourth time to get a Linksys device only to find out that it doesn't support Mountain Lion OS.

     

    Guess I'm destined to get another AirPort Extreme.

  • 4. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    BobTheFisherman Level 6 Level 6 (10,970 points)

    Of course LinkSys routers work with Mountain Lion.

     

    Maybe you are refering to the disk that comes with the router. The disk and software is not needed for any router. Routers are pretty much plug and play out of the box. You then need to access the router admin pages using your browser to set up security and other settings you want.

  • 5. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    thomas_r. Level 7 Level 7 (27,925 points)

    The NetGear set up easy enough and serviced up to seven devices, but at least once a day, it had to be restarted to be seen. Even then, the Internet connection was not always there.

     

    If that's happening with multiple routers, that's more indicative of a problem with the incoming network connection than anything. My Time-Warner cable internet connection is reliable for a long time, then I'll get a sudden flurry of problems that get my wireless router all tied in knots. Although rebooting the router fixes the problem temporarily, it's not a problem with the router, it's a problem with the incoming service. Sometimes it'll fix itself after a few days or a week of once daily reboots (at a minimum), and sometimes I have to call Time-Warner and get them to do something to the cable modem remotely to fix it.

     

    Of course, the other possibility is that you're consistently using an incorrect setting on all the wireless routers.

  • 6. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,990 points)

    My last straw was to return to BestBuy for the fourth time to get a Linksys device only to find out that it doesn't support Mountain Lion OS.

    All routers are blind to what hardware they're connected to. Windows, Mac, Linux; they don't care. Either they're configured correctly, or they're not.

     

    Since you're using a stand alone router, may I then presume you're using a DSL or cable modem in line with the router? If so, conflicting IP addresses could be the issue.

     

    If this is an accurate assessment, disconnect both units. Plug the DSL or cable modem directly into the Mac with an Ethernet cable. In your web browser, type 192.168.0.1 into the URL field and press Enter. It should connect to the modem and display a configuration screen. This is simply to verify that the modem's address is the default of 192.168.0.1.

     

    Disconnect the modem and plug the router directly in the Mac with an Ethernet cable. Go into your browser and type in the same address. If the router also responds to 192.168.0.1, that's your problem. Go into the router's configuration pages and change its IP address to something else. A change as simple as 192.168.0.2, or 192.168.1.1 is sufficient. Click whatever button is necessary to accept the changes. The router will likely ask you to restart it so it can change its DHCP settings to the new IP address.

     

    Once that's done, unplug both the router and the modem. If they have a power button, use that (not all units have a power button and the only way to kill them is to unplug the unit). Power your Mac down also. Now plug things back in the normal way. Modem to your incoming line, then its Ethernet out to the router's WAN port. Then the Mac to any LAN Ethernet port if you're using a wired connection.

     

    Turn the modem on and wait until it's ready. Turn the router and wait until it appears to be in a ready state. Lastly, turn on your Mac so it can configure its new DHCP address the router will assign to it. That should be it.

  • 7. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    VikingOSX Level 5 Level 5 (5,475 points)

    I have owned D-Link, Netgear, TP-link, Linksys (including DD-WRT) routers. Since these devices, I have owned two Apple Airport Extreme Base Stations (v3, and v4). The Apple products have worked flawlessly for me.

  • 8. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    dmingo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hmm. I can connect to sites on the Internet (obviously) because I have connected my iMac directly to my cable modem via Ethernet. But when I type 192.168.0.1 into my browser, the progress bar stalls like I'm not on line.

     

    I just connected the router directily to the iMac with E cable with the same dumb stare from the monitor- same stalled progress bar.

     

    I've done the whole sequential restart process as suggested, and see the Ciscoxxxx in the WiFi menubar, but still get no connection via WiFi. What does this reveal?

     

    Message was edited by: dmingo

  • 9. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    SteveKir Level 3 Level 3 (545 points)

    Mine is a ThomsonTG585 v8. Totally reliable.

  • 10. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    keg55 Level 5 Level 5 (5,925 points)

    I think Linksys routers use 192.168.1.1 to get into the Web configuration interface.

  • 11. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    dmingo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks. I just tried this address with the router with same result.

  • 12. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    Kurt Lang Level 7 Level 7 (31,990 points)

    I can connect to sites on the Internet (obviously) because I have connected my iMac directly to my cable modem via Ethernet.

    Hmm, if you have the cable modem connected directly to the Mac as your normal setup, then how is the router connected? It should be daisy chained to the modem and the Ethernet cable connection to your Mac should be to the router, not the modem.

    But when I type 192.168.0.1 into my browser, the progress bar stalls like I'm not on line.

    That definitely isn't right, the modem should respond to that address. At least if the modem is using the usual default address it should.

     

    That you get the same blank return with the router tells me one of two things. That you possibly have the Ethernet cable between the Mac and each separate unit plugged into the wrong ports (basically impossible to get wrong on the modem since it should only have one Ethernet port), or neither unit is using the default address of 192.168.0.1, which would be the more likely result of no response in your browser.

     

    At this point, I'd have to do a lot of guessing without knowing what hardware you have. Please post the exact make and model of both the cable modem and router.

  • 13. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    dmingo Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    My modem is connected to my iMac for the sake of this communication. Normally, the modem is connected to the router via Ethernet (using the yellow-tagged connection labeled Internet) and then my iMac connected to the router via Ethernet using the only connection on the iMac and one of the four Ethernet ports on the router.  I connected my iMac to the router using the Internet port for the test you suggested. Should the the router test connection have been to one of the Ethernet ports? DIdn't know.

     

    Here's the poop on the devices. The modem is a Cisco DPQ2202 (I can get deeper into the label descriptions if necessary). The router is a Cisco Linksys E1200.

     

    Thanks

  • 14. Re: Wireless Router- Mountain lion?
    drdocument Level 4 Level 4 (2,995 points)

    FWIW, I had a similar challenge with cable modem and router.

     

    While the cable modem may be able to "distribute" multiple IP addresses with DHCP, if a separate router is used the router should be the only device connected to the cable modem, and the router then shares a different range of IP addresses (also by DHCP), usually with a different subnet mask.

     

    My cable company (Comcast) requires cable modem to recognize one and only one device as the "authorized device" to which it is connected, and when I first set up my account with my computer connected directly to the cable modem my computer's MAC address became the "primary authorized device." So when I introduced the router (Time Capsule) into the mix I had to call them and get them to re-set the TC as the "primary device."

     

    I made this call while my Mac Pro was connected by Ethernet to the Time Capsule, with the TC as the sole device connected to the cable modem. Comcast Support was then able to re-set my account to recognize the TC's MAC address, and after that all was well, with Time Capsule distributing local IP addresses on its own subnet by both Ethernet and wifi.

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