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storing presentations in Aperture?

1127 Views 30 Replies Latest reply: Oct 21, 2012 2:36 PM by babowa RSS
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hotwheels 22 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
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Oct 17, 2012 9:28 AM

can anyone give me a little advice as to how to manage "presentations" on the Mac and in Aperture?

 

i have gotten started with putting together little "slideshows" in Aperture that i can also post to something like Vimeo on the web and I have also done a more formal KEYNOTE presentations. i also have pdf versions of this which i 'digitally printed' but i now know that Aperture does not like multi page pdf files.

 

so in addition to .key files that i cannot seem to import into Aperture i am also noticing that i have .avi and .mov and 3gp file types as well that are already in Aperture.

 

three questions:

 

1. is there a "best" way to handle the avi or mov or 3gp files such as exorting them and then re-importing as some kind of mac "standard" file type?

2. can i get the keynote presentations into aperture or do these have to stay in a folder in finder somewhere?

3. any other advice on organizing this sort of "presentation data" on the mac?

 

THANKS for any help on this.

 

Jon

Mac Pro, Mac OS X (10.7.4), with 64 bit Win7 in Parallel
  • William Lloyd Level 6 Level 6 (19,205 points)
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    Oct 17, 2012 9:36 AM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    Aperture is _not_ a media manager.  It's just not.

     

    Aperture is for storing photos.  It is a _photography_ application.  It does videos, too, but it's bare-bones in that respect.

     

    You cannot import Keynote presentations into Aperture.  Nor can you import Word documents, Pages documents, Numbers documents, Excel spreadsheets, or anything else.  Aperture won't do it, and it's not good at it.

     

    Use Aperture for your photos (and, to a lesser extent, videos).  And that's it.  If you want to create presentations in Keynote, work on your photos in Aperture, and then export those photos and use them in the Keynote at the END of things.  Forget about importing the presentation back into Aperture; that won't work, and it's not Aperture's intent.  It is not a junk drawer.

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,375 points)
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    Oct 17, 2012 9:48 AM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    Jon,

    a list of supported file formats is here:

    File Formats You Can Import into the Library

     

    Aperture can import, adjust, and manage pictures.

     

    Why would you want to import Keynote presentations into Aperture? They are not photos - they use and contain photos.  Keynote would not be able to access and edit them, if they are in the Aperture library. Use the Media Browser to share your Aperture photos to Keynote and keep the presentations  in a separate folder. MacOS is slowly changing to an Application centric operating system - like IOS, so in the long run it will help to keep your documents arranged by application.

     

    Léonie

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,375 points)
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    Oct 17, 2012 10:49 AM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    also, is there a list of supported video files?

    Aperture 3: About Video and Audio formats in Aperture

     

    I use iMovie to store videos, so I do not know much about supported video formats in Aperture. But Aperture supports quicktime movies - only Quicktime is a wrapper for a variety of codecs; it will only work, if the codec of the media fork of the movie is supported. You may need to install additional video codecs (for example perian), or use VLC instead of QuickTime as a movie editor.

     

    can you explain what media browser is

    Media Browser is the interface between your iLife and iWork applications. I am sure you have frequently used it. The MediaBrowser is a window that you can access in many apps and it will give you access to audio files, photos, and movies, like here in iWeb, for example:

    media3.png

    In Aperture it is available from the Slideshows, in iTunes you can use it to sync your albums and projects to your mobile devices, in Mail you have the Photos Browser to send your pictures. In keynote you see it in the Inpector and can access your iPhoto and Aperture images.

     

    Regards

    Léonie

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (11,550 points)
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    Oct 17, 2012 11:21 AM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    hotwheels 22 wrote:

     

    1. can you explain what media browser is?


    "Help" is, more often than not, helpful -- it should always be the first place you look for answers.  If you have iWork installed, searching Help for "Media Browser" should bring up results that look like this:

    /___sbsstatic___/migration-images/200/20050687-1.jpg

     

    HTH.

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,055 points)
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    Oct 17, 2012 6:45 PM (in response to hotwheels 22)

    I've found the best way to store videos or files used in a project is to simply create a folder (park it on the dekstop, or in the Documents folder) with the name of the project. I just started a new one which will result in a movie playable in a DVD player.

     

    I will be editing my videos in Final Cut Express (for layering videos for special effects in menus and transitions), assembling things in iMovie, creating slideshows in Photo to Movie (far superior to any OS native app in my opinion), and, when it's all done, assemble all of it in iDVD for authoring/burning.

     

    If you put all the photos, videos, etc. needed for a project in one folder, then it is much easier to keep track of. I would not use Aperture because it simply isn't meant for that type of thing. It does an excellent job as a photo enhancing tool.

     

    FWIW, I do not use either the iPhoto or Aperture libraries (that is my personal preference) - if I need to work on some photos, I will import them into Aperture, fix the photo, export the enhanced version, and delete whatever is in Aperture. I do not care for the OS filing system - I prefer my own.

  • Terence Devlin Level 10 Level 10 (121,650 points)
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    Oct 18, 2012 12:31 AM (in response to babowa)

    if I need to work on some photos, I will import them into Aperture, fix the photo, export the enhanced version, and delete whatever is in Aperture. I do not care for the OS filing system - I prefer my own.

     

    You realise, of course, that you can use any filing system you devise with Aperture (or iPhoto) right? There is no filing system forced on you in any way. And also, that you're using a photo manager designed expressly for a lossless workflow to create a lossy one? Wouldn't it just be easier to use an app designed for the work you do? Elements? Acorn? Pixelmator? Graphic Converter?

  • léonie Level 8 Level 8 (46,375 points)
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    Oct 18, 2012 3:06 AM (in response to babowa)

    If you put all the photos, videos, etc. needed for a project in one folder, then it is much easier to keep track of. I would not use Aperture because it simply isn't meant for that type of thing. It does an excellent job as a photo enhancing tool.

    Babowa, really interesting. I am doing the exact opposite.

    I use Aperture as a database to retrieve photos - not only as photo editor and storage. And the smart retrieval aspect is much more important to me than the storage aspect. I know of no other tool that will let me index and find my photos based on a variety of tags and other criteria with a simply search rule, and my main Aperture library contains all my photos collected during several decades, beginning with the baby pictures of my parents to the pictures that I use for teaching.

     

    If I want to create a screensaver with great pictures of sunsets at sea I can search in one rule for five-star rated pictures with the keywords sunset and sailing - this search will scan all pictures, independent of the location of the referenced files. I can search for camera type, resolution, place, subject, even my custom tags, like height of the sun over the horizon and define smart albums and web pages based on these rules.

     

    And Aperture keeps track of the different versions of any image and stores them economically. I do not have to waste diskspace on different versions of the same image by creating duplicates.

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (22,055 points)
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    Oct 18, 2012 9:08 AM (in response to léonie)

    Well, different strokes for different folks. I prefer to manage my photos; I don't care for the "inbuilt" management. I don't want (actually can't stand) "events", "projects", "dates", "faces", or whatever is the default. I don't need tags. I don't want "ratings" - my photos are either worth keeping or they're not. I can find my Columbia river gorge trip photos in a folder I created and appropriately named "Gorge 2012". So, as long as I can remember that I was in the gorge    , I can find the pictures, LOL

     

    I can search for camera type, resolution, place, subject, even my custom tags, like height of the sun over the horizon and define smart albums and web pages based on these rules.

     

    Great for you if you need that - I have no need for it.

     

    And Aperture keeps track of the different versions of any image and stores them economically. I do not have to waste diskspace on different versions of the same image by creating duplicates.

     

    Again, I don't have a need for that because I don't keep more than one photo. It is either the original or a digitally enhanced version - whichever I like best is the one that is kept.

     

    The only exception would be my artwork creations, but those are not photos - I will keep my original background for instance because I may use that again in another project (i.e. the birthday card I created for baltwo).

     

    @ Terence:

    Wouldn't it just be easier to use an app designed for the work you do? Elements? Acorn? Pixelmator? Graphic Converter?

     

    I may use one or more/all of the following with one photo (depending on what I will be using the photo for): Graphic Converter, PS Elements, Image Tricks, Aperture, Digital Photo Professional, Swift Publisher and Photo to Movie. I will also use Photos while making a movie (as a background, for video layering, etc with FCE, LiveType, iMovie HD, the new iMovie and iDVD). I've experienced very little loss since I won't save as a .jpg until I'm done working on it.

     

    FWIW, I believe we had a similar conversation some time ago; I simply want and use folders for my photos: "gorge 2012". I don't want it cross referenced, places, faces, dates, or whatever - just a container (folder) holding those particular photos. I find it much easier to deal with that than having to worry about a previous/future/incompatible library version. I control my Photos folder and can drag a copy of it anywhere I like.

     

    I actually tried iPhoto some time ago and became completely frustrated at the flashing/moving dates "2010", "2011", etc while scrolling and trying to find a photo. I prefer a filing cabinet type filing system: alphabetically arranged folders containing appropriately named pics. I also use column view (never icon view). I never did find what I was looking for in iPhoto - until I went to my folder to find it.

     

    As for keeping all materials in one folder while working on a movie project: since my sources are from half a dozen different people besides myself, I do not want any of those photos or video clips permanently - once I'm done with the movie, they will be deleted (there will be about 300 GB worth of files accumulated). It is therefore much easier for me to keep all of them in one folder (after I've catalogued them, weeded out what I don't want, enhanced others, etc - in other words, once they're the right size, look good, and ready to use). I'm dealing with photo sizes from 480 x 319 to 1920 x 1080 (and video in 720p and 1080p) and I have to find ways to incorporate them all and make the whole thing look good. And, when the movie is done and 20 - 40 copies burnt, the entire movie project folder is Toast (pun intended)

     

    As I said, different strokes for different folks - my system works for me whereas iPhoto's, Aperture's, et al does not.

  • Terence Devlin Level 10 Level 10 (121,650 points)
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    Oct 19, 2012 3:09 AM (in response to babowa)

    I'm not questionning your system, as you say it works for you. But I notice this

     

    I may use one or more/all of the following with one photo (depending on what I will be using the photo for): Graphic Converter, PS Elements, Image Tricks, Aperture, Digital Photo Professional, Swift Publisher and Photo to Movie.

     

    Graphic Converter, Image Tricks, Elements and DPPro are not even the same kind of App as Aperture (and iPhoto.) They are editors, and as you specificlly do not want versions, they are certainly the apps for you. My query is why you would use Aperture at all, since it's designed to specifically to work in exactly the way you don't want?

     

    As for the flashing dates in iPhoto - you know that's a setting in the Preferences, right? That simple. And you can do exactly your system in Aperture and iPhoto, and trash the whole lot at the end and  - with the exception of FCE, but not with the exception of its successor, FCP X - all the other apps integrate with both iPhoto and Aperture.

     

    Regards

     

     

    TD

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