Previous 1 2 Next 19 Replies Latest reply: Oct 25, 2013 8:12 AM by MarkieMA
Ivo Nicola Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hello,

 

My Macbook Pro (late 2011, running OS X 10.8.2) fails to boot. When in verbose mode it hangs after the entry "FIPS USER SPACE POST" appears.

 

It first happened a week ago. I used a new router, had bought a new HP mouse and an Epson Printer the week before. No system updates were installed in the days before. When it first happened, I had just downloaded a game (Empire Total War) from the App Store. I also put in new RAM, but only after the problem first occured.

 

Zapping the PRAM didn't do anything. Single user mode did not boot either. In verbose mode, it froze after the aforementioned entry appeared. Disk utility did not fix it either.

 

I then restored from my time machine disk. The system ran fine until exactly a week after the first instance, when it did the exact same thing again. So I did a fresh OS install and then transferred the data from the backup.

 

Now (one day later), it's happening for the third time.

 

From what I understand, FIPS is some security/encryption standard integrated into mountain lion, but I do not use the file vault tool nor would I know of any other encryption stuff running.

 

That's the story so far, I would be very glad about any help/suggestions.

 

Thanks,

Ivo


MacBook Pro (15-inch Late 2011), OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2)
  • dmdimon Level 3 Level 3 (840 points)

    can you show a photo from screen in verbose mode? Not only last string is interesting.

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,475 points)

    The problem has nothing to do with FIPS. It's a hardware fault. Make a "Genius" appointment at an Apple Store to have the machine tested.

    Back up all data on the internal drive(s) before you hand over your computer to anyone. If privacy is a concern, erase the data partition(s) with the option to write zeros* (do this only if you have at least two complete, independent backups, and you know how to restore to bare metal from any of them.) Don’t erase the recovery partition, if present.

    *An SSD doesn't need to be zeroed.

    If you want to preserve the data on the internal drive(s), you must try to back up now, before you do anything else. It may or may not be possible. If you don't care about the data, you can skip this step.

    There are several ways to back up a Mac that is unable to fully boot. You need an external hard drive to hold the backup data.

    1. Boot into Recovery (command-R at startup) or from a local Time Machine backup volume (option key at startup.) Launch Disk Utility and follow the instructions in the support article linked below, under “Instructions for backing up to an external hard disk via Disk Utility.”

    How to back up and restore your files

    2. If you have access to a working Mac, and both it and the non-working Mac have FireWire or Thunderbolt ports, boot the non-working Mac in target disk mode by holding down the key combination command-T at the startup chime. Connect the two Macs with a FireWire or Thunderbolt cable. The internal drive of the machine running in target mode will mount as an external drive on the other machine. Copy the data to another drive. This technique won't work with USB, Ethernet, Wi-Fi, or Bluetooth.

    How to use and troubleshoot FireWire target disk mode

    3. If the internal drive of the non-working Mac is user-replaceable, remove it and mount it in an external enclosure or drive dock. Use another Mac to copy the data.

  • Ivo Nicola Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you all for your help!

     

    I just brought it to the store and they ran a hardware check, which indicated no problem. What makes you sure that it is, Linc Davis? Did you encounter the same problem before?

     

    The guy at the store suggested I do a clean install without transferring any data from the backup, so I might go with that. Alternatively I may try wjosten's suggestion of installing the fips administrator tool after restoring from the backup again.

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,475 points)

    The step in the boot process that comes after FIPS initialization is the one that's failing. That would be "waitForSystemMapper." I can't find documentation of what that does, but if you can't get past it even in single-user mode after a reinstallation, there isn't much else it can be but a hardware fault. Third-party software would have no effect in single-user mode.

  • dmdimon Level 3 Level 3 (840 points)

    after FIPS initialization is the one that's failing. That would be "waitForSystemMapper."

    independent kexts and services start asyncronously, so there are no warranty of some constant order of initialisation.

     

     

    I met (and not once) weird thing - kext with incorrect permissions of internal parts(like different NIC plugins), but correct permissions of package itself, will not be permission-repaired.

    And of cos incorrectly owned part will not load, and things can go really strange, including silent lockup.

     

    I don't want to tell that it is it, but i'd give it a try.

     

    like this:

    $ sudo chown -R 0:0 /System/Library/Extensions

    $ sudo chmod -R 755 /System/Library/Extensions

  • Ivo Nicola Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The weird thing though is that it worked fine for a week (and plenty of reboots) after I restored it first. The second time where I did a fresh install (transferred data afterwards from the backup though) it at least worked for a day, so I would guess that this makes a hardware fault less likely, quite apart from the guy in the store finding none.

     

    I followed this part of the instructions wjosten posted above:

     

    --

     

    Power-On-Self-Test

    Upon restart, your system will automatically perform the required Power–On–Self–Test (POST).

    If there is any issue identified with the CoreCrypto Module, the system startup process will log the error to system.log, then stop and shut down the system.

    If the CoreCrypto Module integrity has been verified, the system startup process will log the success to system.log and continue.

    It is also possible for an administrator to verify the integrity of the module at anytime by executing the cc_fips_test command as root. To verify the module’s integrity, execute the following command in the Terminal application after enabling root:

    /usr/libexec/cc_fips_test -v

    Sample output from verified module integrity check

    A fips_mode boot arg was set: fips_mode=2
    About to call the FIPS_POST function in the corecrypto.dylib
    FIPS USER Space POST: Integrity test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: AES GCM Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: AES CBC Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: AES AESNI ECB Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: AES AESNI XTS Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: TDES CBC Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: SHA Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: HMAC Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: RSA Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: ECDSA Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST: DRBG Test success!
    FIPS USER Space POST Success!
    Returned from calling the FIPS_POST function in the corecrypto.dylib: result = true

    Sample output from an unsuccessful module integrity check

    A fips_mode boot arg was set: fips_mode=2
    About to call the FIPS_POST function in the corecrypto.dylib
    FIPS USER Space POST: Integrity test failed!
    Returned from calling the FIPS_POST function in the corecrypto.dylib: result = false
    FIPS_POST failed!"

     

    --

     

    When I ran the cc_fips_test -v command using safe mode, it indeed came up with an unsuccessful module integrity check, returning this single line:

     

    FIPS USER Space POST: Integrity test failed!

     

    Does that tell me anything, like that is indeed a FIPS-related problem? Or is that failed check completely normal given that I have never used FIPS or installed the administrator tool?

     

    Btw: this is the screenshot of verbose mode:

     

    Foto.JPG

  • Linc Davis Level 10 Level 10 (155,475 points)

    The second time where I did a fresh install (transferred data afterwards from the backup though) it at least worked for a day, so I would guess that this makes a hardware fault less likely, quite apart from the guy in the store finding none.

     

    I'd think the opposite. Hardware faults are often intermittent in their effects. I also think that failure of "Geniuses" to detect such faults is a common occurrence. They have a software test suite that's a cut above the almost worthless Apple Hardware Test in accuracy, but still far from perfect.

     

    When I ran the cc_fips_test -v command using safe mode, it indeed came up with an unsuccessful module integrity check

     

    I get the same thing, and my Mac isn't failing to boot.

  • dmdimon Level 3 Level 3 (840 points)

    BSD root : disk0s2

    ....

    /dev/rdisk0s2 (NO WRITE)

     

    tells us that root FS mounted read-only

     

    executing fsck_hfs

    tells us that FS repair invoked - that is normal after unusual reboot, but should be invoked on RW filesystem....

    .... and there are no traces of actual fsck execution, no even error messages about RO mode.

     

    something is wrong with filesystem.

    Looks like something of what you're using sets root FS attributes to RO.

    Do you use any third-party system-related tools? Optimizers, preventers, backupers, syncronizers, data lockers, encryption - I don't know what is it?

  • Ivo Nicola Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have now done a clean re-installation of the OS, without transferring any data from the backup. I'll see whether the problem reoccurs. If it does, I guess it really is a hardware fault.

     

    @dmdimon: I used an Antivirus Freeware App (Virus Barrier Express) and I had just installed an optimizer last week (only after it happened for the first time and I never used it). For Backup I always used Time Machine, and I can't think of any other apps/utilities that could have messed up something.

  • Bucken Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have run in to the same issue you seem to have had, after having installed a new ssd disk. Did a clean install resolve your issue?

  • Ivo Nicola Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Until now  (3 days after the clean install), the problem has not occured again. After the first time it happened it took a week though for it to re-appear, so I'm not completely sure yet.

  • jami0821 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Just wanted to post an update here because I was having the same problem as Ivo Nicola. Verbose stops just after FIPS.


    I took it to an Apple Genius who could not find anything wrong with my machine too (all hardware checked out).

     

    Macbook Pro

    15-inch, Late 2011

    Processor  2.4 GHz Intel Core i7

    Memory  8 GB 1333 MHz DDR3

    Graphics  AMD Radeon HD 6770M 1024 MB

    Software  OS X 10.8.2 (12C60)

     

    Long story short, I deleted nearly all of the apps I'd installed over the last few months. Ran a disc check. Restarted, and voilà! Started up normally.

     

    Here's a screenshot of my verbose check now. You'll notice that it's NOT 'waitForSystemMapper' that comes directly after FIPS on my machine but rather 'Ethernet address', 'Waiting for DSMOS', and 'macx_swapon':

     

    verbose.jpg

     

    So just want to confirm that it's not a hardware problem.

  • Stephan Sann Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    +1

     

    Same thing happend to me on an iMac late 2009 running OS X 10.8.2. It appeared short after a fresh install. Until than I only had a few high-level applications and VirusBarrier Express (as a low-level application) installed. So I already had a suspicion that it would be VirusBarrier Express' fault.

     

    After reading about VirusBarrier Express here, I'm almost certain that VirusBarrier Express is causing this problem.

     

    TQ6xltSkW_c175226NikPOx0TEX9Jc_Oe9eHNOaClJE.jpeg

     

    If you are reading this, it's likely that you also have this issue. So I would like to bring up some hints to bring you back on track:

     

    Since your Mac isn't starting up any more (in my case even Safe Boot didn't work) you may be concerned about your un-backuped data (such data surely shouldn't exist ;-) ). Don't panic - chances are high you can still access your files.

     

    If you are in the nice position to have a bootable USB-stick with (Mountain) Lion prepared (http://arstechnica.com/apple/2012/07/how-to-create-a-bootable-backup-mountain-li on-install-disk/), just plug it in and restart your Mac hitting "alt"-key until you reach the startup-volume-selection and move on to the "OS X Utilities". (If you don't have it prepared you can do it on another Mac running (Mountain) Lion.)

     

    Sure you can try an install-process from here, but if you prefer being better safe than sorry you can copy files from your HD to an external drive at this stage. Open "Utilities | Terminal" and cd to "/Volumes". Here you find your HD and external drives. You can copy your stuff with something like this:

    cp -R /Volumes/yourMacHD/Users/yourUsername /Volumes/yourExternalUSB

     

    jj9h4cJbfhc8oEL9NumBSDQmnUNYgkJhnanRncAjYTo.jpeg

    S-x83JQ6UMM1R2kJnRLaXT8Wy8h1kLoeIrOUSY97NTA.jpeg

     

    If you do not have an USB-stick and no other Mac to create one, you can still enter the single-user mode (hit command-s with startup). Maybe you have to mount your external drive manually (didn't try it out) - something like "mount -t auto /dev/disk1s2 /your-mountpoint". In this situaltion your HD should be mounted on "/", so you do not need to copy from "/Volumes":

    cp -R /Users/yourUsername /your-mountpoint

     

    After backup you have a lot of options. Try to repair your system or do a fresh install. Good luck!

Previous 1 2 Next