Previous 1 2 Next 16 Replies Latest reply: Nov 16, 2012 10:10 AM by Memoire
Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

As Mac OS 6.8 unzip utility wouldn't open a password protected file, also couldn't get Terminal to unzip it, I searched for a utility that could open the document. I found Zipeg program, which did in fact unzip the file. But when I tried to quit the Zipeg program it opened Safari and accessed this url.

http://www.zipeg.com/installed.mac.html?q=installed.mac10.68_i386_x2.j1.6037.v2. 9.4.1316.m2048MB

 

I thought this strange, and wondered if the program was calling home, perhaps confirming installation on my Mac.

 

I had done a scan with ClamXav prior to running the program. and found no issues.

 

For safety I did a system search and found then deleted files in the User Home preferences, Cashe. and Zipeg.plist with the name Zopeg

 

Has anyone had experience with this utility and if so any idea if any files could still be remaining on the system with different naming?

 

Would be welcome any ideas.


MacBook, Mac OS X (10.6.8), iPad & iBook OS 10.6.8
  • seventy one Level 6 Level 6 (11,160 points)

    Google Zipeg.   There you will find several pages telling you about the utility but most important, from your point of view, it confirms it is absolutely safe.

  • MadMacs0 Level 5 Level 5 (4,575 points)

    Memoire wrote:

     

    I found Zipeg program, which did in fact unzip the file. But when I tried to quit the Zipeg program it opened Safari and accessed this url.

    http://www.zipeg.com/installed.mac.html?q=installed.mac10.68_i386_x2.j1.6037.v2. 9.4.1316.m2048MB

     

    I thought this strange, and wondered if the program was calling home, perhaps confirming installation on my Mac.

    From the URL it would appear that you are partially correct, in that Zipeg is collecting statistics concerning where their software is being installed, but my guess is that it's being done anonymously. It's useful for developers to know what kind of users are downloading and installing their software so they know where to expend their efforts and not unusual for them to be collecting such data. I've never seen it done quite this way. Some (such as ClamXav) will ask your permission to do this, while others don't. They might also be collecting your IP address to help identify your approximate location, but my guess is they aren't trying to identify your Mac beyond that.

  • Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Thank you seventy one having a number of results on Google doesn't give me confidence at it is easy to achieve this. It does seem strange that the Zipeg should want to initiate opening a page in Safari with a URL that is indicative of some information gathered from the computer it has just been installed on. Surely such information being transmitted should be the choice of the user.

     

    I appreciate the reply MadMacs0 thank you for the feedback. WIth all the fun I have had with other programs such as MacKeeper, I have no trust in programs that can be downloaded as trials or freeware. I downloaded Zipeg because someone had sent an urgent pdf that was zip password protected and OS 10.6 can't open these. Resending would take 12 hours due to the source office being close. When the URL was automatically opened I was reaching for the off switch of the modem automatically. 

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,695 points)

    Get Little Snitch, which will stop this kind of thing dead in its tracks. Worth every penny it costs. I think there is still a free demo version. I wouldn't run a Mac without it.

     

    http://www.obdev.at/products/littlesnitch/index.html

  • Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Hi WZZZ, thank you as always for your kind help.

     

    I used to have Little Snitch installed, not to sure what happened as it seems it is no longer listed in 'Others' in the System preferences. Wierd!

     

    Just took a look at getting a new version and installing it; it seems like a new version, magic.

     

    Thank you for your valuable input.

  • Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Seems Little Snitch was already installed, when I ran the version 3 it just updated the earlier one. Little Snitch used to show up under others in the System Preferences a while back, perhaps the program change; but thank you WZZZ now updated.

  • MadMacs0 Level 5 Level 5 (4,575 points)

    Memoire wrote:

     

    Seems Little Snitch was already installed, when I ran the version 3 it just updated the earlier one. ; but thank you WZZZ now updated.

    I thought I remembered you having it from earlier discussions.

    Little Snitch used to show up under others in the System Preferences a while back, perhaps the program change

    That was some time ago. They changed it to an application "Little Snitch Configuration" and it still uses the menu icon /___sbsstatic___/migration-images/202/20213029-1.png

    I'm still at v2.5.4.

  • Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Hi MadMac0 I had forgot it was installed, but as I tried to install V3 it just updated the previous one. HAd no idea it was still on my HD. Seems to be working OK at present. Seems quite intrusive sometimes, especially with Google requests.

  • noondaywitch Level 6 Level 6 (8,130 points)

    That's because Google is connecting to loads of third party sites to drag in ads and all the stuff you don't want.

  • Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Hi noondaywitch It is difficult what to allow from google and what not; even when denying something it still pops up again and again. Also it's difficult when buying things on line, what to allow and what not. Well at least there is a choice.

  • noondaywitch Level 6 Level 6 (8,130 points)

    Yes, it does take some time to work out what's what.

    I also use the NoScript extension in FireFox, and that can sometimes be a challenge to work out what scripts to allow and what not to.

  • Memoire Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    I found it easier with NoScript in Firefox, as it is specific to the page or what was clicked. But with Little Snitch it is sometimes difficult. I got strange ones coming up, but after searching on the internet I found that they were necessary. But Google is a good example, unending if you don't click accept.

  • noondaywitch Level 6 Level 6 (8,130 points)

    I have Google permanently blocked now, including their cookies.

    Means I can't use YouTube, but that's no loss to me.

     

    I use Bing and other search engines.

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,695 points)

    One of the little known features of NoScript is it will by default sanitize/scrub Google link tracking redirects (with Google/JS allowed, the link tracking redirects to Google happen on mousedown--it's instant; you never notice it), either with Google allowed or not.

     

    I don't have Google blocked, but I do have all Google cookies blocked in Firefox. No problem viewing YT. (I don't use YT often enough to care if they know my views or not. Blocking Google cookies doesn't have any adverse effect on YT.) I'm using Google HTTPS for searching, after having tested using Bing, Startpage and DuckDuck. Unfortunately, none of those gave the complete results that Google did, so I went back to the big bad ogre. I'm fairly confident Google isn't getting one bit of data out of my searches. Blocking all Google cookies, at least for searching, doesn't appear to hamper anything, including images and maps. In addition, I always clear the cache, cookies and history at the end of a browsing session, usually at the end of the day, and quit Firefox.

     

    I also use, among other things, Ghostery and ABP, naturally. I have exceptions for Startpage and DuckDuck from the time when I was trying them out and wanted to save their settings.

     

    Screen shot 2012-11-16 at 10.09.57 AM.png

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