Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next 63 Replies Latest reply: Nov 19, 2012 8:43 AM by Csound1 Go to original post
  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    But I have a little program called 'Caffeine' and that does the job

     

    I can flick it on and off whether if I want my system to 'keep awake' or not

     

    Anyway, I'm going to change the settings, that's safer

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Is it recommended (by you) to use CCC in the future instead of TM for making back-ups?

     

    Or just after this process switch back to TM?

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (40,325 points)

    Continue to use TM, CCC is different, it gives a snapshot of your drive 'in the moment' TM offers History and versions etc, a CCC clone is the best way to keep working in case of a hard drve failure, reboot to the clone and you're working again in 2 minutes. TM takes care of the longer term issues. Use both.

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So maybe once in a while making a CCC clone is recommended? On another drive of course.

    Is it possible when update my CCC clone in the future (when I've got another drive) that it only change the effectively changed parts, like TM does, but that CCC only keeps the most updated version?

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (40,325 points)

    1tio1 wrote:

     

    So maybe once in a while making a CCC clone is recommended? On another drive of course.

    Is it possible when update my CCC clone in the future (when I've got another drive) that it only change the effectively changed parts, like TM does, but that CCC only keeps the most updated version?

    Yes, I do recommend it, and yes, CCC will perform an incremental clone (changes only) which is quite fast.

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Okay, thanks. So the clone is complete (finally!)

     

    What's next?

  • steve359 Level 6 Level 6 (12,255 points)

    Power off, boot holding "option" and select the clone as boot device.  This will ensure the close works.

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    So the clone is bootable, I'm currently running ML on my clone.

     

    What's next?

  • steve359 Level 6 Level 6 (12,255 points)

    READ THIS ENTIRE POST BEFORE ACTING

     

    Play with the clone a bit.  Open websites, open pictures, etc.

     

    The next step *would be* to use DiskUtility to re-partition your internal drive as 1 partition, Extended Journaled.  That is about as destructive as things get, and you want your new "source" (your clone) to be proven reasonably.

     

    I would continue to advise, but have only restored SL systems from clones, which do not have "recovery partition".  That small but signficant detail of the Recovery Partition means you do not want to follow my best guess.

     

    I will watch for Csound1's response to see the proper procedure.

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Okay, don't worry, I'll just play until Csound1 responds

     

    But thanks anyway, it was also the same I thought what should come next

  • Csound1 Level 8 Level 8 (40,325 points)

    Hi

     

    Next you will restore the clone to your new partition (Steve, it is the same procedure as SL) so ... follow Steve359's directions to erase and repartition, when finished open CCC on the clone and restore it to the internal, in other words reverse the procedure.

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Okay, I'm going to do that

  • steve359 Level 6 Level 6 (12,255 points)

    Csound1 ...  Thanks for fillling in. I thought RP made life more interesting.

     

    There are 3 standard modes.  One does NOT create archives but deletes all existing copies of the source files that exist on the target  I use that to "clone back".  The mode that DOES create archive copies will make a "_CCC" directry at the top level of the target.

     

    If you create a "_CCC" directory at top level when you restore to internal, you can simply delete it.

  • 1tio1 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I'm doing the reverse process now, I can wait again for a while

  • steve359 Level 6 Level 6 (12,255 points)

    This is an unpleasantly long process.  But it is a disaster recovery process that most will need at somwe point, certainly when you decide to get a new and larger harddisk.