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iTunes 11 - How do I add movies to my library without them going to the worthless Home Videos section?!

83284 Views 78 Replies Latest reply: Mar 8, 2014 9:03 AM by DJ.Rumpy RSS
  • Steve Taylor1 Level 5 Level 5 (4,660 points)

    My answer was in response to hotelling 13's query. You do not need to add an MPAA rating. You just set the Media Kind either before putting it in itunes or after as Sea Beast said. It will show uo in the right section wehter you have a PG, R or whatever rating. That does not affect it

     

     

    As ripping Commercial DVDs and Blurays would break Copyright law then under the rules of this forum we cannot discuss it.

  • israfelli Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    It is best to set the media kind in the mpeg file itself rather than relying on some behaviour of iTunes in regard to MPAA ratings. it is also best to set the media kind with a tagging tool like Subler or the latest MetaZ rather than using iTunes. The reason is that when you change the media kind in iTunes, iTunes will store the media kind in its own database rather than writing it to the file. If it's not written to the file, then if re-importing it into iTunes again, it will go right back into the home videos folder.

     

    1. remove the file from iTunes.

    2. Use Subler or MetaZ to change the media kind of the file to Movie

    3. Re-import into iTunes.

     

    Because Apple changed the definition values for Media Type for ver11, most of your movies would probably be imported as Home Videos if you re-imported them, even if they are located in Movies now. Best just to remove all your movies from iTunes, run them all through Subler/MetaZ and change the Media kind to movie, then re-import them.

     

    If people would just read my orginal reply here, they'd know what's going on.

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    We aren't discussing ripping techniques Steve. Simply stating the word 'ripping' sn't against forum rules.

     

    israfelli, the reason people are turning to 3rd party tools is that iTunes doesn't allow you to set the MPAA rating for some reason. Even Applescript is unable to set this, which is a curious omission on Apple's part. It is not necessary to remove the file from iTunes after modifying the info. Just open in the info window on the track that needs refreshing and iTunes will re-read the metadata and refresh the iTunes data shown.

     

    Subler is also a good choice (and free) as Steve mentioned. I use it for fixing various video file issues and for muxing tracks, but had forgotten it will also let you set metadata as well.

  • SeaBeast Level 4 Level 4 (2,835 points)

    Hi DJrumpy,

     

    Sorry, I haven't understood your previous post.  That would make sense that iTunes would identify commercial DVD using its rating.

     

    DJ.Rumpy wrote:

     

    iTunes doesn't allow you to set the MPAA rating for some reason. Even Applescript is unable to set this, which is a curious omission on Apple's part.

     

    The reason for that omission is that setting MPAA would only make sense for commercial DVD, meaning you are ripping against copywrite laws (unless you want to rate your home movie which would be kind of excessive).

     

    MPAA is a rating given by an official association, I don't think Apple will ever gives options to bypass their ratings.

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Not at all. The forums of full of posts from parents who wish to restrict home video material from children via Apple TV, but they have no way to filter it via content settings that Apple TV supports.

  • israfelli Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)
    iTunes doesn't allow you to set the MPAA rating for some reason. Even Applescript is unable to set this, which is a curious omission on Apple's part.

     

    It's obvious why. It's illegal to rip movies. If you're not ripping movies, then you don't need to adjust an MPAA rating on your encodes (nor a Long Description). It would be surprising if Apple allowed it, as they would be giving an indirect nod of approval to the act of ripping. Apple wants you to buy movies through iTunes. If you're buying them through iTunes and not doing anything illegal, then you have no need to set the MPAA atom. (because apple alreay set it)

     

     

    It is not necessary to remove the file from iTunes after modifying the info. Just open in the info window on the track that needs refreshing and iTunes will re-read the metadata and refresh the iTunes data shown.

     

    That is wrong. iTunes only examines the movie-kind metadata from the file once, when the movie is added to iTunes. If you change the movie-kind in iTunes after that, the meta data in the file itself is not changed, instead, iTunes internal database is changed. So things will appear correct in iTunes, but if you ever need to add the file to iTunes again, or another instance of iTunes, it will go back to being what it is defined in the file.

     

    This is specific to the movie-kind metadata (atom) and a few other atoms (like the sort name). In these cases, apple prefers not to touch the file itself, but to copy the metadata into its own database for subsequent display. This works fine until you have to re-add the movie to iTunes for some reason.

     

    You can either remove the file, change the kind in Subler then re-add it to iTunes, or change it both in iTunes and Subler. The result will be a file with correct metadata.

     

    Want to prove it.. use iTunes to change an encode's media-kind from Movie to TV Show, then open the enocde in Subler and see what the media-kind really still is.

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    No, you are incorrect, both in assuming that you know how or why someone  would want an MPAA rating on a file, as well as how iTunes reads metadata.

     

     

     

    I have refreshed metadata in iTunes hundreds of times doing exactly that. The MPAA rating is stored in the file, NOT in the library. Perhaps next time you should try it before claiming it won't work? It's easy enough. Add a rating to a movie while leaving it in the library. Select the file in the library view, and press Command + I to pull up the Info window. The metadata will be refreshed. You will see the MPAA rating appear in iTunes. Copy the same file to another Mac and add it to the library there, and the MPAA rating is preserved because that info is embedded in the file.

     

    This also works to identify missng files that aren't currently flagged as 'missing'.

  • israfelli Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    I have refreshed metadata in iTunes hundreds of times doing exactly that. The MPAA rating is stored in the file, NOT in the library.

     

    The MPAA rating is stored both in the file and the iTunes database. iTunes examines the file and continualy updates its database/display with the content of that atom.

     

    But this is not the atom I am talking about.

     

    If you actually read my post you'd see I am talking about the media-kind atom, the reason for this whole thread.

     

    iTunes only reads the media-kind atom from the file once, when the file is first added to itunes. There are a few other atoms that behave this way, such as sort name.

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Ignore the proof in front of your face if you prefer then. The very fact that you can pull up the info window after changing the MPAA rating, and see it immediately update the rating in iTunes indicates that it does indeed refresh the data from the file (since the new rating would not be in the iTunes library at that point). If your assumption was correct, iTunes would just rely on the information for the MPAA rating it already had in it's library, and the new MPAA rating would not show in iTunes until you removed and re-added the file.

     

    This is not what happens.

     

    The fact that the new rating does show up as soon as you open the Info window indicates that it DOES read the file metadata when the Info window opens.

     

    We are not talking about changing the movie 'Category'. The original post for this thread was not how to change the home movie category. It was how to prevent it from being added to Home Movies in the first place. Adding an MPAA rating does exactly that.

     

    Note the title of this thread:

    "How do I add movies to my library without them going to the worthless Home Videos section?!"

    Removing and re-adding the file to iTunes is not necessary.

  • israfelli Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    You seem to have a problem with reading-comprehension. As I have stated, what you claim about the MPAA rating is true, but it is not true for the media-kind metadata.

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    How is media kind relevant to this thread? The original post was how to prevent them from being added to home videos when importing. Changing the category from Home Video to Movie for the media kind isn't the answer as you would have to do that after you had already imported into the Library.

     

    Setting the MPAA rating will be set in the file, and it will prevent the file from being added to the Home Movie category when it is imported.

  • Steve Taylor1 Level 5 Level 5 (4,660 points)

    OK so you have a different way of achieving the same result. Either method will achieve the same result. Is there a need to keep posting?

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    Steve, the reason for clarifying is that Media Kind is not set in the file. That setting will not carry over to another library, and if you lose your library and have to re-import, that setting is lost. If you copy your files to another account or computer, that setting is lost. All of the files would be placed in the Home Videos category again on import.

     

    In short, it does not address the question as asked.

     

    The only way to prevent a movie from being added to the Home Video's category when importing is to set an MPAA rating. That info is stored in the file, and will cause the movie to be placed into the 'Movies' category, and the Media Kind will be set to 'Movie' on import.

  • Steve Taylor1 Level 5 Level 5 (4,660 points)

    Fine we will agree to disagree

  • DJ.Rumpy Level 1 Level 1 (10 points)

    You don't have to take my word for it. It's easy enough to reproduce, even on a single Mac.

     

    • Create a second login account on your computer
    • Set the Media Kind to 'Movie' as suggested above. You will see it properly placed in the 'Movies' category and taken out of Home Movies. All well and good.
    • Now copy the file to somewhere the second account can get it.
    • Log into the second account and import the file
    • It will import into Home Movies, and the Media Kind will be set to 'Home Movie' again.

     

    Exactly what this thread is trying to avoid.

     

    Now repeat the same test, but use the MPAA tag to set a rating on the first account using Subler, iDentify, MetaX or whatever.

     

    Copy the file again for the second logon account and import it.

     

    You'll find it does not get imported into Home Movies, but rather into Movies, and the Media Kind is automatically set to 'Movie'.

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