6 Replies Latest reply: Nov 16, 2013 2:09 PM by johnfromgermantown
bobcroweSTL Level 1 (0 points)

This is a MBP 13" Retina with flash drive. It is only a few weeks old. Problem started in last few days. I ran check and fix permissions in Disk Utiliity. Also made sure the folder with all my photographs has RW permission for me through Finder > Get Info > Sharing & Permissions. None of this helped.


MacBook Pro with Retina display, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2)
  • Linc Davis Level 10 (192,529 points)

    Problems such as yours are sometimes caused by files that should belong to you but are locked or have wrong permissions. This procedure will check for such files. It makes no changes and therefore will not, in itself, solve your problem.

    First, empty the Trash.

    Launch the Terminal application in any of the following ways:

    ☞ Enter the first few letters of its name into a Spotlight search. Select it in the results (it should be at the top.)

    ☞ In the Finder, select Go Utilities from the menu bar, or press the key combination shift-command-U. The application is in the folder that opens.

    ☞ Open LaunchPad. Click Utilities, then Terminal in the icon grid.

    Triple-click anywhere in the line below to select it, then drag or copy it — do not type — into the Terminal window:

    find . $TMPDIR.. \( -flags +sappnd,schg,uappnd,uchg -o ! -user $UID -o ! -perm -600 -o -acl \) 2> /dev/null | wc -l

    Press return. The command may take a noticeable amount of time to run. Wait for a new line ending in a dollar sign (“$”) to appear.

    The output of this command, on a line directly below what you entered, will be a number such as "35." Please post it in a reply.

  • bobcroweSTL Level 1 (0 points)

    Thank you for your prompt reply. Terminal showed the following.

     

    202

    bob-mbp-112012:~ robertcrowe$

    bob-mbp-112012:~ robertcrowe$

  • Linc Davis Level 10 (192,529 points)

    Back up all data.

    This procedure will unlock all your user files (not system files) and reset their ownership and access-control lists to the default. If you've set special values for those attributes on any of your files, they will be reverted. In that case, either stop here, or be prepared to recreate the settings if necessary. If none of this is meaningful to you, you don't need to worry about it.

     

    Step 1

    If you have more than one user account, and the one in question is not an administrator account, then temporarily promote it to administrator status in the Users & Groups preference pane. You can demote it back to standard status when this step has been completed.

    Launch the Terminal application in any of the following ways:

    ☞ Enter the first few letters of its name into a Spotlight search. Select it in the results (it should be at the top.)

    ☞ In the Finder, select Go Utilities from the menu bar, or press the key combination shift-command-U. The application is in the folder that opens.

    ☞ Open LaunchPad. Click Utilities, then Terminal in the icon grid.

    Drag or copy — do not type — the following line into the Terminal window, then press return:

    sudo chflags -R nouchg,nouappnd ~ $TMPDIR.. ; sudo chown -R $UID:20 ~ $_ ; chmod -R -N ~ $_ 2> /dev/null

    Be sure to select the whole line by triple-clicking anywhere in it. You'll be prompted for your login password, which won't be displayed when you type it. You may get a one-time warning not to screw up. You don't need to post the warning. If you don’t have a login password, you’ll need to set one before you can run the command.

    The command will take a noticeable amount of time to run. Wait for a new line ending in a dollar sign (“$”) to appear, then quit Terminal.

    Step 2

     

    Boot into Recovery by holding down the key combination command-R at startup. Release the keys when you see a gray screen with a spinning dial.

    When the OS X Utilities screen appears, select Utilities Terminal from the menu bar. A text window opens.

    In the Terminal window, type this:

    resetpassword

    That's one word with no spaces. Then press return. A Reset Password window opens. You’re not going to reset a password.

    Select your boot volume ("Macintosh HD," unless you gave it a different name) if not already selected.

    Select your username from the menu labeled Select the user account if not already selected.

    Under Reset Home Directory Permissions and ACLs, click the Reset button.

    Select  Restart from the menu bar.

  • bobcroweSTL Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks. Worked perfectly.

  • PickArt Level 1 (0 points)

    Solution is simple:

    Open folder with your files then select them all and get info. It will open one window for all pictures, then change permission to W&R. Now you can delete, move and rename pictures from the Bridge.

     

    It is not enough to change permission for the folder only!

  • johnfromgermantown Level 1 (0 points)

    Didn't work for me, PickArt. And, if I read the "info" correctly, it looks as if I do have Read & Write privileges. I can delete files through my finder, when I type in my password, but not thru Bridge. Also, my trash can does not show deleted items....what do you make of this?