8 Replies Latest reply: Jan 8, 2013 11:45 PM by MadMacs0
White-1 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

According to Wikipedia Leopard no longer recieves security updates.

So um… I am using Opera (the latest version) and I've disabled all the plugins and I also use ClamXav and have the latest Leopard updates. Is that all I can do to protect my Mac?

  • Allan Eckert Level 8 Level 8 (45,450 points)

    Why don't you upgrade to a newer version of OS X?

     

    What Mac do you have?

     

    Allan

  • mende1 Level 10 Level 10 (90,805 points)

    Apple does not provide any update for Leopard since the Mountain Lion released. What does it mean? If a security bug is discovered, it will not be fixed, so your Mac, although there aren't any virus, can be hacked.

     

    If you can, I recommend you to upgrade to, at least, Snow Leopard, so you will receive updates, although Snow Leopard will be the next Mac OS X to be discontinued. See > http://store.apple.com/us/product/MC573/mac-os-x-106-snow-leopard

     

    Also, check if your computer is supported > http://support.apple.com/kb/sp575

  • MadMacs0 Level 5 Level 5 (4,415 points)

    White-1 wrote:

     

    According to Wikipedia Leopard no longer recieves security updates.

    That's mostly correct. Apple has made it a habit of only supporting two major OS X versions at a time, but they surprised us all by issuing Leopard Security Update 2012-003 & Flashback Removal Security Update for Leopard Intel users back in May. I doubt that we'll see any more.

    I am using Opera (the latest version) and I've disabled all the plugins

    So that must mean you have an Intel Mac and it's wise to have disabled the Java plugin, maybe even Flash, but all of them?  I would guess that prevents you from seeing a lot of web content.

     

    As others have said, your best course of action is to upgrade your OS to Lion, if possible. Snow Leopard would be an improvement for you as it would protect you against all currently known malware, but that probably won't last much longer.

  • White-1 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    Thank you everyone for answering.

    I have a MacBook White (Early 2008). It is officially supported till 10.7, but it can run 10.8 with hacks. (I've tried. The only issue was the screen brightness. It didn't work, but everything else seemed to work pretty well).

    I have a projects that I can only do on Leopard and also, it's my favorite operating system and also other tiny reasons.

    I don't think Leopard is that old to ditch the security updates. Windows XP has security updates till 2014, doesn't it?

     

    I would like to use Leopard till the Summer, until I am done with my stuff.

    So that's basically all I can do to protect my computer, yes?

  • mende1 Level 10 Level 10 (90,805 points)

    That's all you can do to protect your Mac if you need Leopard. When you don't need it, upgrade to Snow Leopard as soon as possible.

     

    White-1 wrote:

     

    I don't think Leopard is that old to ditch the security updates. Windows XP has security updates till 2014, doesn't it?

     

    Canonical discontinues all Ubuntu versions, except LTS versions, 18 months after their release, and nobody has complained about this

  • White-1 Level 1 Level 1 (30 points)

    That's because Ubuntu is for free and it doesn't require good hardware, like Mountain Lion does.

    What about Little Snitch ? Should I use it?

    So basically I'll be still safe if I don't download the software from the unknown developers and so on?

    How to protect it from hackers and so ? With Little Snitch? Am I wrong?

  • mende1 Level 10 Level 10 (90,805 points)

    Little Snitch can help you to see what processes uses Internet, so it can be helpful for you

  • MadMacs0 Level 5 Level 5 (4,415 points)

    White-1 wrote:

     

    What about Little Snitch ? Should I use it?

    Couldn't hurt, I do. You'll learn a lot about all the processes on your Mac that need to communicate outbound and it's a bit of a PITA to sort all that out, but to me it was worth it. It was the only thing that prevented probably hundreds of users from being infected by Flashback one weekend when reportedly 600,000 others were. It was the only A-V product out there that did so for at least three days

    So basically I'll be still safe if I don't download the software from the unknown developers and so on?

    Sort of.  Make sure you understand why you are entering your admin password or approving an untrusted certificate.  Keep current on what new malware shows up.

    How to protect it from hackers and so ? With Little Snitch? Am I wrong?

    No, hackers need physical access to your computer or local network, so password protecting your Mac when you are away from it, if you use a WiFi router at home use a strong WPA2 password and turning your firewall on when you take your MacBook to Starbucks or some other public network. Same goes for plugging your Mac directly into the modem.  As long as you are behind a trusted router, you don't need to have your computer firewall on as this will somewhat slow down your network access.  Little Snitch should let you know if somebody installed spyware that is sending out info from your computer if they are dumb enough to have not disabled it in the process.