2 Replies Latest reply: Jan 16, 2013 11:56 AM by marconey
marconey Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

I'd like to know for ease of remembering if step 13 in the article could be accomplished though the user folder's Get Info. properyt window in the Finder?

(hey! if I could keep the arcane UNIX commands in my head storage, I wouldn't be loving me' Mac so much!!! Also, who wants to make a mistake through a typo dealing with the cryptic, unfriendly commands in the terminal window?! I stay away from it unless I absolutely have to.)

The options seem to be there in the Finder Get info window. But does the UNIX command accomplish something behind the scenes, subtle, that the Finder operation doesn't?


Mac mini Server (Mid 2010), OS X Server, 8GB RAM
  • MrHoffman Level 6 Level 6 (13,020 points)

    The underpinnings of the Get Info interface are the same Unix interfaces that the Unix commands tickle, if that's your question.

     

    Not that this is any attempt to assuage your concerns, but it's just as feasible and just as possible to mess things up with the GUI tools here — the GUI is often a multi-step process, and it's possible to get the settings wrong in various ways — as with the Unix commands. 

     

    Yes. I know. Not Helping. 

     

    If you're doing this sequence with any regularity, then a script containing the necessary commands could be useful.  Where you enter the target shortname as the parameter or at a prompt within the script, and the script does the rest, for instance.

  • marconey Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    MrHoffman,

     

    Thanks but I don't normally dabble with either this command or gen. any other terminal commands with "any regularity" Ofcourse now that I am inadvertantly wandering into the "Administration" territory with the server, that might change slightly!

     

    Considering your backgroud (yes! you are famous around here ) I can see why you would say "it's just as feasible and just as possible to mess things up with the GUI tools here — the GUI is often a multi-step process, and it's possible to get the settings wrong in various ways — as with the Unix commands." While I do see the advantage of using UNIX commands in certain situations (when for example there's no equivalent command in the GUI etc) treating them both the same in terms of the operator's likelyhood of introducing an error while performing a given command (esp. in this case) is stretching it a bit don't you think?! Is it possibe that the space / context where you come from, your comfort level with the terminal / UNIX commands and because you have spent so much time with the UNIX commandline is perhaps the cause of this subjective opinion? This ofcourse doesn't mean I haven't see people "mess things up" royally through the GUI but I think it has more to do with the operator in that case (pushing a button for example without fully comprehending the context and meaning of the action, being in a hurry etc). But I think a larger percentage of people are more likely to err while typing (esp.) a complex command than using a GUI. I thought THAT is one of the reasons why GUI-based computer interface such as that on the Mac is more ubiquitous in these modern times than the UNIX / text-based interface

     

    In any case, thanks for the help! Much appreciated.