2 Replies Latest reply: Jan 23, 2013 9:27 AM by JayhawkCWE
JayhawkCWE Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

Hi All,

 

I help a pro photographer out here and there and he's having serious Aperture problems.

 

He called me and told me that a card import hosed after two images and Aperture shut down.  I told him to hang tight and went over there.  I launched Aperture and it told me that Aperture frequently crashing could be a sign of a database problem and would I like to repair the database.  I said yes and it started with the progress bar.  It stayed at zero for about ten minutes then shot up to 99% in about another five minutes.  It has now been at 99% for about 16 hours. His library is VERY large.  Hundreds of gigabytes if not a terrabyte.  I've advised him to not let his libraries get that large in the future, but this is what it is.

 

How long could the db feasibly take to repair?  I'm wondering if it's stuck or if the library is just so friggin' huge that it's taking forever to repair the db.  Although, repairs usually go pretty quickly, it's the rebuilds that consume a lot of time correct?

 

Anyway, any advice on how to proceed?  It probably needs to be rebuilt, but should I tell him to force quit out of Aperture now or wait?

 

Thanks in advance!

  • Kirby Krieger Level 6 Level 6 (12,470 points)

    Do not force quit -- it will not help, and will likely make things worse.

     

    LET IT RUN.  

     

    It may take 40 or even fifty hours.

     

    I have never seen a repair not complete.  Best to leave the computer alone.  Make sure it is plugged in and not set to power-down.

     

    If repair is successful, there is no reason to rebuild.

     

    Your client is up against one of the strange limits of a huge database:  the work can be done, but at a time scale that is inconvenient to the user.  Splitting the Library will make these whole-database administrative tasks quicker, but at a significant cost in usability.

  • JayhawkCWE Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks.  I'll advise him to let it continue running.