6 Replies Latest reply: Feb 2, 2013 4:40 AM by Terence Devlin
Michael Odrain Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)

I just upgraded to Snow Leopard - 10.6.8 and through the new apple store application I wanted to upgrade to Mountain Lion and the message read your computer is no Compatible with Mountain Lion. 


iMac, Mac OS X (10.6.8), (1) 2.16 Ghz Intel Core, 3 GB, Airport extreme
  • clintonfrombirmingham Level 7 Level 7 (29,995 points)

    Requires a mid-2007 or later iMac - does yours fall into that category?

     

    Clinton

  • Michael Odrain Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)

    No, my iMac is late 2006.  So what does that mean?  There is no more upgrades for this iMac? 

  • clintonfrombirmingham Level 7 Level 7 (29,995 points)

    Nope - it's now officially a "vintage" machine (I had one, too, but have long since sold it).

     

    Sorry,

     

    Clinton

  • Michael Odrain Level 1 Level 1 (35 points)

    Sorry to bother you and thanks for your help

    Where did you sell your vintage computer?  It isn't like I have another 1400.00 to buy a new computer.  I think it reallly ***** that I got about 5 years out of this iMac.  I bought it in late 09/2007.  How do you know when a mac will last more than 5 years?

  • clintonfrombirmingham Level 7 Level 7 (29,995 points)

    I've sold all of my Macs (in the past 12 years, anyway) on eBay. I had two 2006-vintage models - the 'original' Intel 2006 iMac and the original Intel 2006 MacBook Pro. I sold my iMac when I moved into a nursing home in mid-2006, so I didn't have it long, but I kept my 2006 MacBook Pro until March of 2012 - a full 6 years - when I purchased the current late 2011 15" MBP that I have now (and finally got out of the nursing home!).

     

    I've had Mac's since 1985 and my usual 'recycle time' has been about 3 years, sometimes, more sometimes less. My rule of thumb, now, is that I 'trade up' every three years - shortly before or after my AppelCare extended warranty runs out. It's a good rule of thumb, I think, and it allows me to put enough money aside each month in savings for my "new" future Mac.

     

    I think that 5 years is a good run - and, if it's still working for you I wouldn't worry about not being able to upgrade to the latest OS. There are software issues to consider, too, when you upgrade both your machine and your OS - much of the software that works now on your machine might just simply not run on OS X Mountain Lion. I spent more updating my software when I bought my new MacBook Pro than I did on the machine itself - so you might want to count yourself lucky that you can't upgrade.

     

    Technology changes - and it costs you (quite a lot, sometimes) to stay up-to-date with the latest hardware and software. It's not built-in obsolescence, really, but just the speed with which technology moves. Is it time for you to get a new Mac? You'll have to be the judge of that - keeping in mind that you may have to upgrade a lot of software in the process...

     

    Good luck,

     

    Clinton

  • Terence Devlin Level 10 Level 10 (133,930 points)

    But your Mac still works, doesn't it? Just because you can't update to the latest OS doesn' render your Mac obsolete, does it?