Previous 1 2 Next 19 Replies Latest reply: Apr 3, 2013 3:17 PM by Gil Dawson
Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

I keep looking for a comprehensive list of all error codes sorted by number.  If, for example, something reports an error like "An error of type -1409 has occurred.", it seems there must be a list somewhere of descriptions of errors of type -1409.  Is there?  Does such a list exist?

 

If not, can you help me understand why not?

 

--Gil


MacBook Pro, Mac OS X (10.6.8)
  • seventy one Level 6 Level 6 (11,655 points)

    Here is the nearest I have found to an error list.  

     

    http://www.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/user/lenzo/html mac_errors.html

     

    It is incomplete but of some help I hope.

     

    Why it is not produced by Apple, I don't know, but it seems down to the expotential rise in numbers

  • Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    Thanks, seventy--

     

    That's a very useful list.  Unfortunately, it does not contain the number I'm looking for (-1409). 

     

    Somewhere there just has to be a list like this which contains all the codes. 

     

    --Gil

  • Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    Thanks for trying, Klaus, but these two lists ccontain only a few dozen of the possibly 65,535 error codes.

     

    Both of them contain some intriguing links at the bottom, but the two links that would have included the error code number that I am looking for (-1409) both link to the apple.com site's home page.  Evidently, Apple employees have pulled Knowledge Base articles numbered 9804 and 9806 but, rather than give us a 404-Not Found error, missing links simply lead back to their home page.

     

    I guess the whole Knowledge Base process is defunct; I have seen recently a number of links to "kb" articles handled this way. 

     

    I wonder what this behavior portends?

     

    --Gil

  • seventy one Level 6 Level 6 (11,655 points)

    Hi Gil,

    Did you notice the e-mail link at the bottom of the list I posted to you.   Perhaps you could write to him and ask.   As he said, the list is never up to date but that's also to say that perhaps he infrequently updates it.   Thanks for the star.

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,775 points)

    Best to just try your luck googling a code. See what someone else is getting that code for.

  • Mark Jalbert Level 5 Level 5 (4,600 points)

    From the file:

     

    /System/Library/Frameworks/CoreServices.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/CarbonCore.framework/Versions/A/Headers/MacErrors.h
    
    
      errFSForkNotFound         = -1409, /* Named fork does not exist */

    Error codes exists in many different Frameworks for example the file:

     

    /System/Library/Frameworks/Automator.framework/Versions/A/Headers/AutomatorErrors.h
    

     

    Darwin error codes can be found in the file:

     

    /usr/include/sys/errno.h
    
  • Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    Thanks for the suggestions.  I sent Kevin a message...

    Hi, Kevin--

     

    Thank you for compiling a very large list of Mac error codes.  I just got one that's not on your list, -1409.  I'm not sure what caused it.  I got it when I tried to run an AppleScript...

     

        set aFileRef to open for access file "MBProHD:Users:gil:aPackage"

     

    where aPackage was a package, instead of a file.  Not sure what it means.

     

    --Gil

     

    I  tried Googling "An error of type -1409 has occurred."  It got a large number of hits; however most were of the form "Try this and see whether it goes away."  In other words, no definition.  Then I found one thread where a Senior Member posted a definition without attribution...

     

    Error: -1409

     

    Macintosh system error (-1409) * Named fork does not exist */ error

     

    The info we have on this error means that some part of the OS is damaged or missing, (assuming that the HD directories & such aren't messed up). Try reinstalling the last big combo update from Apple. It's possible that you will have to do an "Archive & Install" to repair your system files.

     

    Now we're getting somewhere, but where did he get that definition?  The source seems to be a 2010 message on the Adobe Reader Bulletin Board.  The contributor's email is marked "private" and it's not obvious how to reach him or her.

     

    Thanks, WZZZ, for your helpful suggestion. 

     

    Back to my original question -- Where's the list? -- I guess we're all disappointed to learn that none of us knows where some Apple employee keeps it. 

     

    --Gil

     

    P.S.-- I just got word back from Mail about my message to Kevin...

     

    Delivery to the following recipient failed permanently:

     

        lenzo@cs.cmu.edu

     

    Ah, well.  Guess I'm ready to give up now.

     

    --Gil

     

    Message was edited by: Gil Dawson

  • WZZZ Level 6 Level 6 (12,775 points)

    A lot, if not all, the error code lists you may come across are way out of date. Some even for OS9 or earlier.

  • Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    Wow!  Thanks, Mark.  That's really helpful.  The answer has been right here on my computer all along!

     

    (Actually, on my Mac running 10.6.8, it's not  at the  location you cited, but the principle is what matters.)

     

    What if you don't know the framework?  Do you have a technique for searching by number (e.g., -1409) to find the framework that contains the corresponding errors.h file?  Simply putting "-1409" into the search field of a Finder window doesn't work; it gets "more than 10,000" hits.

     

    How did you do this? 

     

    --Gil

  • Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    WZZZ wrote:

     

    A lot, if not all, the error code lists you may come across are way out of date. Some even for OS9 or earlier.

     

    This is what makes Mark's technique so interesting.  Frameworks are filed by OS Version (I think), so, if you get multiple definitions for the same number, you can figure out which one pertains by scrutinizing the paths to where each definition is stored.

  • Mark Jalbert Level 5 Level 5 (4,600 points)

    How did you do this?

     

     

    I would use the Terminal.app and enter the following command->

     

    find /System/Library/Frameworks/ -type f -iname "*err*.h" -exec grep -lw "\-1409" {} +
    

     

    More than likely you will find your error codes in MacErrors.h unless the error is low level in which case /usr/include/sys/errno.h will contain the error code.

  • Gil Dawson Level 1 Level 1 (80 points)

    Wow!  That's great, Mark!  Exactly what I was looking for...

     

    Erm, I don't seem to have got the formula right.  Here's what it did on my machine, running Terminal on 10.6.8:

    h-66:~ gil$ find /System/Library/Frameworks/ -type f -iname "*err*.h" -exec grep -lw "\-1409" {} +

     

    [After a pause of several seconds...]

     

    h-66:~ gil$

     

    I tried making the command a little simpler, to see if it might work, but no...

     

    h-66:~ gil$ find /System/Library/Frameworks/ -type f -iname "*err*.h"

     

    [After a pause of several seconds...]

     

    h-66:~ gil$

     

    I'm not familiar with Unix nor the 'find' command.  Perhaps I should research it. ('man find' I suppose?)

     

    Are you running a different MacOS?  Perhaps the error.h files are in a different place.

     

    --Gil

  • Mark Jalbert Level 5 Level 5 (4,600 points)

    Hmmm....I'm not sure what is going on. I'm running 10.6.8. Here's the command and the output that I get->

     

    [bash-3.2.48] ~ $ find /System/Library/Frameworks/ -type f -iname "*.h" -exec /usr/bin/grep -lw "\-1409" {} +
    /System/Library/Frameworks//CoreServices.framework/Versions/A/Frameworks/CarbonCore.framework/Versions/A/Headers/MacErrors.h
    

     

    I changed the command to find all header files. Let me explain what the command says:

     

    Find all files nested in the directory /System/Library/Frameworks that end in .h then search (grep) those files for the word -1409 and print the name of the file.

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