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IMAP GMAIL DOWNLOADING THOUSAND OF MAILS CONSTANTLY

1172 Views 6 Replies Latest reply: Apr 4, 2013 2:13 PM by MadMacs0 RSS
eduardo114 Calculating status...
Currently Being Moderated
Apr 3, 2013 7:15 PM

On my laptop, I have one gmail IMAP account set up. It is quite old and has tens of thousands of messages stored in many folders.


Mail.app is caching them locally, but frequently it seems to feel the need to re-download many thousands of them. The Mail Activity panel always shows things like "Incoming messages: 4507 of 10833, 53 KB/s".


If I look at the activity window, it is synchronizing IMAP folders ... and the folders it is synchronizing haven't changed in over two years: I have stopped storing new messages in them. So it should already be synced, and Mail.app shouldn't have to download new messages anymore. But it re-downloads them often.


I don't think the problem is with the folders on the server, It is a gmail account, which I'd assume Google configures intelligently. Though, the desktop is on all the time and Mail is always open, so maybe it does re-download them frequently but I don't notice.


It's very annoying because it pegs my processor at 100% for about 20 minutes every time it happens, which is often. Slows down the machine and heats it up enough to burn my lap in just a few minutes!


Any thoughts on how to get Mail.app to be sane about syncing local copies of remote IMAP messages? This is ridiculous.

MacBook Pro with Retina display, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3)
  • MixMac05 Calculating status...

    I am having a similar issue over here. I read in another forum that its the Mail app and when you send an email that is too large it keeps trying to resend it over and over and kills the ram. When I scan with clam xav they come up as some kind of .xmil file that shows it as a trojan. After deleting them all with the clamxav and secure deleting them my computer has been okay but seems slower then it was for some reason. I have not used the Mail App yet since I do not want to deal with it but will test it soon. Ive been looking for a permanent fix but have yet to find one, I am going to open the App soon and see what happens. Ill stay posted...

  • MadMacs0 Level 4 Level 4 (3,320 points)
    Currently Being Moderated
    Apr 3, 2013 10:14 PM (in response to MixMac05)

    MixMac05 wrote:

     

    When I scan with clam xav they come up as some kind of .xmil file that shows it as a trojan. After deleting them all with the clamxav and secure deleting them my computer has been okay but seems slower then it was for some reason.

    I can't find any ".xmil" file extension, are you sure that's what they were? I would have guessed that they were .emlx files, but you said your not using Apple Mail, so what are you using for an e-mail client?

     

    Never use ClamXav (or any other A-V software) to move (quarantine) or delete e-mail. It will corrupt the mailbox index which could cause loss of other e-mail and other issues with functions such as searching. It may also leave the original e-mail on your ISP's e-mail server and will be re-downloaded to your hard drive the next time you check for new mail.

     

    So, if you choose to "Scan e-mail content for malware and phishing" in the General Preferences, make sure you do not elect to either Quarantine or Delete infected files.

  • MixMac05 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Ahhhhh okay, yes they were .emlx files. And yes I am just using the standard mail app that comes on the mac with that bird flying across what looks like a stamp lol. Now where in the General Preferences would I find the

    'Scan e-mail content for malware and phishing?" This sounds like the way to go. Appreciate the input

  • MadMacs0 Level 4 Level 4 (3,320 points)

    MixMac05 wrote:

     

    where in the General Preferences would I find the 'Scan e-mail content for malware and phishing?

    Third checkbox in General Preferences.

     

    And here's how you go about handling any .emlx infected files in the future:

     

    When possibly infected e-mail files are found:

    • Highlight the entry in the ClamXav window's top pane that needs to be dealt with.
    • Right-click/Control-click on the entry. 
    • Select "Reveal In Finder" from the pop-up menu.
    • When the window opens, double-click on the file to open the message in your e-mail client application.
    • Read the message and if you agree that it is junk/spam/phishing then use the e-mail client's delete button to delete it (reading it is especially important when the word "Heuristics" appears in the infection name).
    • If you disagree and choose to retain the message, return to ClamXav and choose "Exclude From Future Scans" from the pop-up menu.
    • If this is a g-mail account and those messages continue to show up after you have deleted them in the above manner, you may need to log in to webmail using your browser, go to the "All Mail" folder, find the message(s) and use the delete button there to permanently delete them from the server. Then check the "Trash" folder and delete them there.

     

    To fix the corrupted mailbox index(es), highlight each one that was corrupted and choose Rebuild from the appropriate menu.

    iMac (21.5-inch Mid 2011), OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3), i7
  • MixMac05 Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Wow, more direct of an answer then I was thinking! Thanks a lot man really appreciate it and saved this for future use. So do most advanced Mac users not use any type of AV or such since the OS is able to handle most things on its own? And where could I find a great basic Mac maintnence type literature? Like just general updating and advanced user settings and such. Great info, thanks

  • MadMacs0 Level 4 Level 4 (3,320 points)

    MixMac05 wrote:

     

    So do most advanced Mac users not use any type of AV or such since the OS is able to handle most things on its own?

    I don't have any statistics on it, but I would guess that most do not. Mountain Lion has a lot of anti-malware features that will fully protect you against all currently known malware. It probably won't help with tomorrows threat, but the same can be said of most A-V software available to OS X users today.

    And where could I find a great basic Mac maintnence type literature? Like just general updating and advanced user settings and such.

    There are several such tips posted in the User Tips area here in the ACS forum, but I tend to recommend Randy Singer's Macintosh OS X Routine Maintenance.

     

    I don't really know of a repository for advanced user settings. They tend to be posted to various blogs on a daily basis.

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