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toltecwarrior Level 1 (0 points)

I'm going to need it when I'm done re installing this whole system

 

this whole system now that I have a time machiNe..just got to work up the courage;-)


Mac Pro, OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.3)
  • Allan Eckert Level 9 (50,731 points)

    None.

     

    None needed.

     

    Allan

  • John Galt Level 8 (45,990 points)

    toltecwarrior wrote:

     

    I'm going to need it when I'm done re installing this whole system

     

    Can you explain your reason for this need?

  • toltecwarrior Level 1 (0 points)

    oh that's it you know what you're doing have to learn and I shall   thank you

  • toltecwarrior Level 1 (0 points)

    yeah my system is stuck on silver screen login windows don't know me the map above it you got the menu to the left top but I can go into utilities and I just got a time machine so I'm hoping to do a full reinstall it's kind of knew I don't have anything important to save

    just trying to work up the courage..lol

  • toltecwarrior Level 1 (0 points)

    a lot of permission problems that I tried fixing in utilities and I went to single user mode with help of your buddies  over there ;)

  • Electricidad Level 1 (70 points)

    Yes, you NEED an antivirus program, all computers do.

     

    Download ClamXav for free from the App Store.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 (30,749 points)

    Yes, you NEED an antivirus program, all computers do.

     

    Download ClamXav for free from the App Store.

     

    What you need is to learn how to protect yourself against malware. Anti-virus software is not sufficient for the job, all by itself, nor is it something that is required to keep you malware-free on a Mac. See my Mac Malware Guide.

     

    Further, the recommendation for any App Store anti-virus software does not mesh with your first statement. All anti-virus software in the App Store is utterly incapable of scanning many areas of your system and cannot do any kind of "real-time" scanning. They can be good if all you want to do is manually check out a suspicious file that someone e-mailed to you or something along those lines, but not for much else.

  • toltecwarrior Level 1 (0 points)

    which is why I am starting my one on one on Monday at the Apple Store I Really want to know my  MegaMac ;)so I can fix and do anything and I want...I will me recording music on it so I don't want this to happen anymore, thank you guys for the input ,

  • The hatter Level 9 (60,930 points)

    The only thing you might want to do IF you install Snow Leopard, is to turn on Mac OS X built in software firewall. maybe. In Lion and ML it will be enabled.

     

    Those backups? from when first installed? Essential to me to have at the ready.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 (30,749 points)

    I'm not sure that I would be confident that a one-on-one session at an Apple Store will help much with regard to learning about malware and how to effectively protect yourself. Not all Apple Store reps have much knowledge on this topic, from what has been reported in these forums. You may get lucky, but you may not.

  • toltecwarrior Level 1 (0 points)

    I'm doing the one on one so I can get to know my computer even though I got it November and set it up to a couple months ago I'll learn all the malware stuff from you guys ;-) it's pretty cool that you guys here to help us rookiEs and most people for that matter....

  • Electricidad Level 1 (70 points)

    Thomas A Reed wrote:

     

    What you need is to learn how to protect yourself against malware.

    Malware and viruses are not the same thing. Malware is a user-education and common sense issue as they cannot be installed without admin permission and the most harmful ones are automatically blocked by Apple's built-in Xprotect.

     

     

    Thomas A Reed wrote:

     

    Further, the recommendation for any App Store anti-virus software does not mesh with your first statement. All anti-virus software in the App Store is utterly incapable of scanning many areas of your system and cannot do any kind of "real-time" scanning. They can be good if all you want to do is manually check out a suspicious file that someone e-mailed to you or something along those lines, but not for much else.

     

    That is blatantly false information. ClamXav scans the entire computer, including bootcamp partitions.

  • thomas_r. Level 7 (30,749 points)

    Malware and viruses are not the same thing.

     

    You're right, they're not, but you seem not to understand what the term "malware" means. "Malware" is an all inclusive term, encompassing all malicious software, including viruses, worms, trojans, rootkits, spyware, etc.

     

    Malware is a user-education and common sense issue as they cannot be installed without admin permission and the most harmful ones are automatically blocked by Apple's built-in Xprotect.

     

    Also wrong. Not all malware is blocked by XProtect. Most of the recent Mac malware has involved vulnerabilities in Java, Flash or Microsoft Office in order to get itself installed behind the user's back, bypassing XProtect entirely.

     

    All anti-virus software in the App Store is utterly incapable of scanning many areas of your system

     

    That is blatantly false information. ClamXav scans the entire computer, including bootcamp partitions.

     

    Not the version of ClamXav that is available in the App Store. All AV software in the App Store is sandboxed, due to the restrictions of the App Store, and thus cannot access many areas of the system.

  • MadMacs0 Level 5 (4,722 points)

    Electricidad wrote:


    Malware and viruses are not the same thing. Malware is a user-education and common sense issue as they cannot be installed without admin permission and the most harmful ones are automatically blocked by Apple's built-in Xprotect.

    Where did you find that definition of Malware?  Here's one I normally use http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malware.

    ClamXav scans the entire computer, including bootcamp partitions.

    Well yes, it does scan the entire hard drive, but it cannot scan any files that the user does not have read access to. That includes most other user's files and many that belong to the system.

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