9 Replies Latest reply: May 11, 2013 6:19 PM by MlchaelLAX
tedha Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

I have an Imac Intel 5,1 with Snow Leopard. I really have to learn how to burn DVD discs from the internet and emails. I'm pretty much clueless and would appreciate clear step by step instructions. Thank you.

 

Ted


I MAC, Mac OS X (10.6.4)
  • MartinR Level 6 Level 6 (14,860 points)

    When you say "burn DVD discs" are you talking about burning files to a DVD disk, or creating a DVD that you can play in a DVD player?

  • tedha Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Hi Martin,

     

    I just want to be able to burn DVD discs to copy files off the computer or to copy videos on youtube or videos on the internet. I would play the burned disc either on the computer or on a separate video player.

  • babowa Level 7 Level 7 (27,945 points)

    You can do burn regular files; for videos you need video authoring software - however, as your intent is to copy material that is protected by copyrights and DRM, we are prohibited to discuss such things here (or we'd be violating the ToU). FWIW, YouTube's terms specifically forbid downloading content unless there is a download button.

     

    For files, simply create a burn folder in Finder, drag your files to it, drag it onto the DVD icon and hit Burn.

  • tedha Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for explaining the copyright limitation re videos on line.

     

    I have a specific case, where it might be possible that the copying might be exempt from this limitation. I wonder if you could comment on this. I am a paid subscriber to a few golf swing/lesson programs. I get regular video tips online by email updates. I would like to record selected videos I find of interest and have them handy for review. Otherwise they drop out of sight. The videos on youtube I can understand fall under the copyright restriction.

     

    Ted

  • MartinR Level 6 Level 6 (14,860 points)

    Briefly, anything you have not created yourself is subject to someone else's ownership and copyright. You have a legal and moral obligation to respect their ownership.

     

    Even "Fair Use" provisions do not permit generalized copying of works for personal or other uses.  Time shifting for later viewing may be considered Fair Use but  permanent copying and retention, multiple viewing or other use of the copied work is not.

     

    It's probably safe to say that the producer of those golf videos holds the copyright and when you signed up for the service you probably agreed not to copy their videos. Check their TOU.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    The golf site probably sells DVDs of their programming series.  Check their website...

     

    Look into SnapProX.

  • tedha Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Thanks for the replies everyone. I'm wondering if I could copy the videos to my computer. I wopuld not be creating "hard" permaneny copies then. They would be the same  files for later viewing. Does this sound reasonable and ethically proper? If so, how do I do that?

     

    Thanks, Ted

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    For obvious reasons, streaming technology is designed to make it difficult for the end viewer to be able to save the streaming file and convert it to a "watchable" format.

     

    For non-copyrighted content, content that is otherwise in the public domain or where "fair use" is applicable, you would have to digitize it to your computer while playing an uninterrupted stream; using either Audio Hijack Pro for audio streams or Snapz Pro X for audiovisual streams. The end result of these products are files that will play in iTunes.

  • MlchaelLAX Level 4 Level 4 (1,970 points)

    Martin: I am finding it really hard to read your last post!