Previous 1 14 15 16 17 18 Next 461 Replies Latest reply: Mar 31, 2014 3:40 PM by Marsdy Go to original post Branched to a new discussion.
  • zachi Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    You keep making this assertion, and it is not based on the same terminology as everyone else. Your Mac Pro today, other than the original Mac Pro 1,1 has at least FOUR CPU's if it is a single-chip model, and as many as TWELVE if it is the top of the line latest model with two chips.

     

    It is not correct to say that the cylindrical Mac Pro does not have a second CPU. It comes with up to twelve. (It is possible it may have models with only FOUR.)

     

    What is correct to say is that the new Mac pro does not have a second CHIP holding CPUs. But this is a 30 percent speed Advantage, not a knock-off.

    grant, i have a dual 6 core xeon mac pro. there are already pc sytems with way faster dual 8 core E5 xeons, a technology which apple never used. by end of 2013 the 12 core xeons will be out... but the mac pro is just a single cpu system. probably with models of 4, 8 and 12 cores.

     

    so the question is:

    12 cores on one cpu in the all in one not expandable mac ive VS

    2x12 cores on a freely scalable and expandable dual cpu pc system

     

    ah terrible i sound like a pc guy... that makes me sad

  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 9 Level 9 (53,090 points)

    Most people, including Apple, would consider the new MacPro to have one CPU with 12 cores.

    Apple is EXTREMELY careful about Terminology. There is no place in ANY official Apple Literature that refers to this Hardware in that way. YOU are the outliers.

     

    If you expect other Readers to take the rest of your statements seriously, you need to use these terms correctly. Your insistence on using well-understood terms in inventive ways reduces your credibility and makes meaningful discussion impossible.

     

    "A computer can have more than one CPU; this is called multiprocessing. Some integrated circuits (ICs) can contain multiple CPUs on a single chip; those ICs are called multi-core processors."

    from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU

  • Grant Bennet-Alder Level 9 Level 9 (53,090 points)

    but the mac pro is just a single cpu system.

     

    The assertion that the new Mac Pro is "just a single CPU system" is not accurate. It will have 12 CPUs (and Multi-Threading), and they will be on a single chip.

     

     

    by end of 2013 the 12 core xeons will be out

     

    By the end of 2013, the 12 core processor you are referring to is exactly the one that will be installed inside the new cylindrical Mac Pro.

  • zachi Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    The assertion that the new Mac Pro is "just a single CPU system" is not accurate. It will have 12 CPUs (and Multi-Threading), and they will be on a single chip.

    Grant it is a single CPU system ! ONE processor, not TWO processors. serveral cores makes it faster,  but still way slower compared to a dual cpu system with two of the same CPUs.

    By the end of 2013, the 12 core processor you are referring to is exactly the one that will be installed inside the new cylindrical Mac Pro.

    exactly. but pc workstations will have TWO of them. the fastest mac will be way slower than the fastest pc.

     

    your lack of acceptance of the downsides makes me more and more suspicious...

    are u a paid forum moderator?

  • Marsdy Level 1 Level 1 (0 points)

    Most people, including Apple, would consider the new MacPro to have one CPU with 12 cores.

    Apple is EXTREMELY careful about Terminology. There is no place in ANY official Apple Literature that refers to this Hardware in that way. YOU are the outliers.

     

    If you expect other Readers to take the rest of your statements seriously, you need to use these terms correctly. Your insistence on using well-understood terms in inventive ways reduces your credibility and makes meaningful discussion impossible.

     

    "A computer can have more than one CPU; this is called multiprocessing. Someintegrated circuits (ICs) can contain multiple CPUs on a single chip; those ICs are called multi-core processors."

    from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CPU

     

    OK so it has ONE processor with up to 12 cores.... Happy now? It was perfectly clear what I meant. Regardless of the pedantics, you can bet HP will have a workstation with two 12 core "processors"  by the end of the year with 4K support and it will blow the new Mac Pro out of the water. I and many other potential ex-Apple users will be voting with our wallets and buying a pro workstation worthy of the title. This is Apple's problem not mine.

  • The hatter Level 9 Level 9 (60,850 points)

    HP Dell yes they have support for quad socket and 192-256GB RAM. Windows and linux support 192-512GB RAM. Apple has never competered in that class. IBM had hot swap nemory, PCI boards, Chipkill in their defunct now IntelliStation.

     

    Some customers want to cut cost to power and cool E5 IvyBridge-E to reduce cost and size and how much water to cool processors and storage.

     

    Naybe Intel wanted to field test a new design at a price no one could walk away from to be bleeding edge. NSA's massive centers in Utah and Texas hold enormous collections of Xeons as well as other in supercomputer class.

     

    Maybe this is just the baby 1.0 toc-tic

     

    A mm azing though no one gaving used one but dug in on their side.

  • Mark Styles Level 3 Level 3 (640 points)

    20 years ago I bought a new Mac every 3 - years. Since 2000 I've stretched that out to  I bought the fastest 2008 mac pro.  I have six HD in Mac Pro, including an SSD.  I have two esata raid setups too. 

     

    I want to start seeing 10 terrabyte drives.. I'm not pleased with the idea of having to buy an expensive box or adapter cables to make use of the new macpro.  I'd consider going to 'hackingtosh' but I heard too many issues pop up with each OS update..  The idea of connecting all this external stuff to a sleek now macpro, makes me an unhappy camper.

     

    The best option for me might be to buy the last of the traditional MacPro's..

     

    For the time being, I'll keep using my 'getting worn out' macpro.  But I think at this point Apple wants to make the most $$$ it can.. That means lots of iphones, ipads, laptops..  The MacPro is probably at the end of their list of profitability.  So it's impossible to predict how this will play out..

  • Ziatron Level 4 Level 4 (3,755 points)

    The best option for me might be to buy the last of the traditional MacPro's..

     

    That is the option I am hearing from most Mac Pro users I know.  But 6 Core, or 12?

  • FatMac>MacPro Level 4 Level 4 (3,600 points)

    Ziatron wrote:

     

    The best option for me might be to buy the last of the traditional MacPro's..

     

    That is the option I am hearing from most Mac Pro users I know.  But 6 Core, or 12?

    Unless you have software that can saturate 24 threads, stick with the 6 core. If you've been following this thread, you've seen posts  about the overhead of adding a second CPU to the mix.

  • Ziatron Level 4 Level 4 (3,755 points)

    Unless you have software that can saturate 24 threads

     

    I've heard this alluded to before.  But how do you know if you are running such software?

  • FatMac>MacPro Level 4 Level 4 (3,600 points)

    Ziatron wrote:

     

    Unless you have software that can saturate 24 threads

     

    I've heard this alluded to before.  But how do you know if you are running such software?

    In Activity Monitor, you've seen that CPU usage can run over 100%. Each thread in each core in each CPU accounts for up to 100%, so, for example, when I process a large number of raw digital images in DxO Optics Pro on my 6 core Mac Pro, the DxO CPU usage runs as high as 1,120% (and the computer really heats up). That program can make use of whatever threads are available, but I suspect most software cannot, at least not yet.

  • Leslie Bell Level 2 Level 2 (340 points)

    FatMac\>MacPro wrote:

     

    In Activity Monitor, you've seen that CPU usage can run over 100%. Each thread in each core in each CPU accounts for up to 100%, so, for example, when I process a large number of raw digital images in DxO Optics Pro on my 6 core Mac Pro, the DxO CPU usage runs as high as 1,120% (and the computer really heats up). That program can make use of whatever threads are available, but I suspect most software cannot, at least not yet.

     

    Any rendering program worth anything (except Sketchup; always the holdout, Sketchup!!!) can fully use all 24 threads, and it's fun to click on the activity monitor scale and watch them light all the way up. Thea Render and its free precursor Kerkythea had this cabability.

     

    I find the fans are able to keep the computer cool even at full processing for more than a week at a time.

  • FatMac>MacPro Level 4 Level 4 (3,600 points)

    Leslie Bell wrote:


    ...I find the fans are able to keep the computer cool even at full processing for more than a week at a time.

    And I bet you don't need extra heat in winter...

  • Leslie Bell Level 2 Level 2 (340 points)

    Actually, I find the nine external hard drives and Dell 30" put out a ton more heat. Have a fan blowing right on them. Have killer air conditioning too here in the desert.

  • Ziatron Level 4 Level 4 (3,755 points)

    That program can make use of whatever threads are available, but I suspect most software cannot, at least not yet.

     

    This is my point, it seems like people are guessing or estimating how many threads can be utilized. There is no way to really KNOW however.

     

    This is my problem in trying to decide whether we should purchase more 6 core, or 12 core Mac Pros before they are discontinued.

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