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  • Ron Hollatz Level 1 Level 1

    I assumed that was enabling or disabling the network. I'll try it without the checkbox.

  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10

    I assumed that was enabling or disabling the network.

    2.4 GHz and 5 GHz are always enabled.  The check box merely allows you to assign a different name to the 5 GHz band.

     

    By default, the box is not checked. Most users should leave it that way.

  • Guy Towle Level 1 Level 1

    Tesserax:  (Thanks for all your great input on all the Apple threads - extremely helpful!)

     

    I have virtually the identical setup as the h-man that you replied to above:  Comcast cable modem>multi-port switch>ethernet throughout house>wireless access point on one ethernet point.  I need to provide wiFi to my basement and would like to do it via a "roaming" network because I have ethernet ports throughout the house.  I was confused by your responses to various folks in the string above.  Can EITHER the wireless base station OR a router like your CISCO be hooked directly to the cable modem, or does the primary base station have to be the first thing off the cable modem?  My existing network has just a switch between the cable modem and the wireless access point device and works fine (just not enough coverage) but the postings seem to say that in order to create  roaming network I cannot just hook wifi devices to my ethernet network.  Something has to be in the line first.  (Note:  the Comcast cable modem is also a router.)

     

    Can you help my confusion?

     

    Thanks.

  • kirkensgaard Level 1 Level 1

    I have a variant of this you guys perhaps can help with:

     

    I live in a large flat which has previosly been two separate flats, thus I have two separate incoming high speed internet lines - one in each end of the flat (same price for me whether I use one or both). In one end I have a Time Capsule and in the other an Airport Express. How do I get the maximum out of this situation, i.e. high signal wireless all over, but only having 1 common wirelss network setup. As far as I can see, a roaming network would be the way, but that seems to assume you physically link the two basestations - this is not an option here - and also seems stupid with the two separate inlets.

     

    Any suggestions for a setup?

  • gwazi Level 1 Level 1

    Hi Tesserax

    I have almost exactly the same setup as you, except I use a Netgear router rather than a fancy Cisco one. I see you have all your Airport base stations running in bridge mode. I guess because the Cisco is doing all your DHCP NAT etc.

     

    My question is, does this work OK? That is, you don't have to have the primary Airport device in DHCP mode as the Apple article suggests.

     

    Also does this setup work with the Netgear router also running a Wi-Fi network with the same SSID?

     

    Thanks for you help. Andy

  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10

    That is, you don't have to have the primary Airport device in DHCP mode as the Apple article suggests.

    Not Tesserax, but I will offer a comment or two here.

     

    Apple could have made their roaming network illustration a bit more clear with several examples.

     

    First, Apple assumes in the example that you will use nothing but Apple routers, which would be expected. Second, the illustration also assumes that you have a simple modem....not a modem/router or gateway device.

     

    So, the first AirPort in the Apple example would provide DHCP and NAT services for the entire network and all the other AirPorts would be configured to operate in Bridge Mode, so they would operate as wireless access points.

     

    It would have been nice if Apple provided another example....one showing that the user did not have a simple modem, but instead a modem/router or gateway type of device. 

     

    In this example, the modem/router or gateway would be providing DHCP and NAT services for the network and all the other wireless access points would be configured in Bridge Mode.

     

    I'm sure that Tesserax will tell you his setup works very well.

     

    Also does this setup work with the Netgear router also running a Wi-Fi network with the same SSID?

    It should, assuming that all the other wireless access points....Apple or other manufacturer.......are configured to use the same wireless network name (SSID), same wireless security setting, same wireless password and each wireless access point is configured in Bridge Mode.

     

    So, you could use your Netgear router as the "main" router providing DHCP and NAT and a mix of other products as wireless access points.

  • NF Horton Level 1 Level 1

    Thank you Tesserax, after two weeks of frustration trying to set up a roaming network in our new house, your response solved the problem in about 5 minutes.

     

    I really appreciate it, thanks.

     

     

     

    Nick

  • Quinkb Level 1 Level 1

    Hi Bob,

     

    First of all I would like to thank for all the help on these discussions. Been following your posts and I have been able to successfully set up a roaming wifi network at my home. I have a simultaneous dual band Cisco EA2700 router as the primary router and have connected an Airport Express and Cisco WAP300N (set to 5 Ghz) to this via ethernet as additional access points. I also have an Apple TV2 connected to the network via wifi.

     

    The trouble I am having is that the Apple TV does not show in the list of available devices on my ios devices - iPhone and iPad. No trouble with the Airport Express showing as an available device in both devices and there is no trouble with Air Play to the AE either.

     

    I checked to see if  its the same on the laptop but the Apple TV shows up as an available device on my Macbook Air and I am able to air play music and videos from the Air to the ATV without any difficulty.

     

    I have tried rebooting the Apple TV a few times. It shows up on the ios devices briefly and then disappears again.

     

    Any thoughts on why this might be happening.

     

    Thanks again for all the help!

  • Dax Jolly Level 1 Level 1

    This is an old response, but why not just configure the TC to "replace" the netgear? It should copy over all of the port forwarding settings, etc. If not, you can easily manually enter them in the TC setup. Then you will have the netgear out of the picture completely. If you need more ethernet ports, then configure the netgear as an ethernet bridge to the TC.

  • SBsyncro Level 1 Level 1

    Hello - thanks to the contributors of this thread for providing such clear and helpful instructions.  A model for forum citizenry! 

     

    Quick question - I've had a "roaming" network with a pair of airport extreme base stations funcitoning well for several years.  The only setting different from the setup recommended on this thread was that I selected channels manually rather than using the automatic setting.  (I was having problems several years ago with interference from a 2.4Ghz phone, but we got rid of it, so now I'm using Automatic). 

     

    At any rate, I notice that when I am using Skype or any sort of bandwidth intensive/connection dependent app on either my Macbook or my iPhone and I move from the front of the house to the rear or vice-versa, my connection always gets dropped.  It doesn't seem that my two airports are successfully "handing off" my connection when I transit the house.   The connection is reestablished within 30 seconds after I move, but as you might imagine, it can be frustrating during the middle of a GoToMeeting or Skype session when the call gets dumped.

     

    Is this normal behavior (brief connection drop while handing off) or should the experience be more seamless?  If the latter, what might I have misconfigured?  Thanks in advance!

  • MacPCmb Level 1 Level 1
    expertise.macosx
    Mac OS X

    Tesserax,

     

    Thanks for the detailed step-by-step setup instructions using Airport Utlity 6.x -- a couple of follow-up questions (if you are still taking them):

    1. In my home network setup, the internet is provided via my FIOS router that is providing DHCP services. 

      To set up a Airport Roaming network, does my "main" base station by defintion have to be set with"Network tab > Router Mode: DHCP and NAT"  or can roaming still work if it is instead set as "Network tab > Router Mode: Off (Bridge Mode) with the FIOS router providing DHCP services?

     

    2. If it is required for a Roaming Network to work properly to have the main base station set with "Router Mode: DHCP and NAT" under the network tab, can you provide some clarification on recommended IP address values should be entered in the Airport Utiltiy under Network > Router Mode: DHCP and NAT > Network Options? In my case, the FIOS Router's gateway address is 192.168.1.1  and the "main" base station's iP address assigned by DHCP is 192.168.1.2.

    Note: the FIOS router has assigned IP addresses of 192.168.1.2 -- 192.168.1.30  and 192.168.1.100 - 192.168.1.110 already, to clients that will not be on the roaming newtork.

  • Bob Meighan Level 1 Level 1

    SBsyncro... I am not the expert but based on my experience I find your routers' behavior similar to mine. I experience the drop out for about 20 seconds when I'm streaming music from my iPhone and moving around the house. I'm not sure if there is any way around this but would love to hear from the experts.

  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10

    To set up a Airport Roaming network, does my "main" base station by defintion have to be set with"Network tab > Router Mode: DHCP and NAT"  or can roaming still work if it is instead set as "Network tab > Router Mode: Off (Bridge Mode) with the FIOS router providing DHCP services?

    If you will read back up a few posts, you will see that I have already answered this question for you.

     

    First, Apple assumes in the example that you will use nothing but Apple routers, which would be expected. Second, the illustration also assumes that you have a simple modem....not a modem/router or gateway device.

     

    So, the first AirPort in the Apple example would provide DHCP and NAT services for the entire network and all the other AirPorts would be configured to operate in Bridge Mode, so they would operate as wireless access points.

     

    It would have been nice if Apple provided another example....one showing that the user did not have a simple modem, but instead a modem/router or gateway type of device.

     

    In this example, the modem/router or gateway would be providing DHCP and NAT services for the network and all the other wireless access points would be configured in Bridge Mode.

    So, with a FIOS router (gateway) "upstream" on the network, any and all Apple routers would be configured to operate in Bridge Mode.

  • Bob Meighan Level 1 Level 1

    I have multiple Airports in a roaming setup, each to be connected by Ethernet. When I connect the Airports 2 and 3, is the Ethernet cable plugged into the WAN or LAN ports on the downstream Airports (2 and 3)?

  • Bob Timmons Level 10 Level 10

    WAN ports on 2 and 3 for the setup.

     

    Although technically, once the downstream AirPorts are setup to operate in Bridge Mode, the WAN port operates as another LAN port.